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Volume 3, Issue 1                                    University of Houston



Great special effects compensate cold performances 
in 'Vertical Limit'


Vertical Limit

Starring: Chris O'Donnell, Bill Paxton, Robin Tunney
Rated: PG-13
Touchstone Pictures

3 stars (of five)


By Rattaya Nimibutr
Breaking News Staff

Audiences normally enjoy films that get the blood pumping and the sweat boiling. In Vertical Limit, moviegoers will get this adrenaline rush full blown.

The action-adventure film is based on a brother's struggles to save his sister when she is trapped in ice 26,000 feet up a mountain. 

This is a simple storyline, and director Martin Campbell (GoldenEye) sorts out the action well. His ability to make several scenes surprisingly enjoyable is the film's principal charm.

Chris O'Donnell (The Bachelor) plays the heroic brother Peter Garrett who, with help from a group of climbers, set off on a journey full of on-the-edge excitement.


Young climber Peter Garrett (Chris O'Donnell) attempts an extraordinary rescue to save his sister in the movie Vertical Limit.

Ken George/
Columbia Pictures

Tunney (Supernova) plays the sister who is trapped in the mountain. Although the height and temperature traumatize her character, she doesn't rise above the run-of-the-mill terror-stricken movie personality.

No actor is a standout in Vertical Limit. Of course, there's really no need for talent, as the movie is dominated by its special effects. The only other thing worth a mention is the humor, which coincides well with the story and keeps the movie from being all-action. The storyline also gets a boost from an emotional undercurrent.

In all, Vertical Limit is typical of its genre: It gives audiences the action they crave, and it's clearly better to sit in a warm theater than to try and save someone trapped on a mountain ourselves.
 

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