AMERICAN CONSERVATIONISTS: WORLD'S BIGGEST USER...

BY STEVE GARRETT

NEWS REPORTER

Americans in both the domestic and business sectors are becoming more energy conscious, chemical engineering Professor William H. Prengle said.

Americans have learned the importance of recycling, he said. "We save our newspapers, segregate our aluminum cans and we're even segragating our glass and plastic bottles," he said.

Prengle said the manufacturing industry, which is the largest user of energy in America, began to worry about energy conservation about 10 years before the 1972 OPEC (Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries) oil embargo.

"There was a high push to improve their methods of manufacturing and reduce consumption of oil," he said.

Now, businesses recycle on a bigger scale. "The steel companies take automobiles smash them flat like pancakes, run them through shears and then sell the remainder as scraps," he said.

The energy-conserving process of congeneration, which takes energy that is lost to the surroundings and converts it into heat, is not widely used in the United States, he said.

"In this country, utility companies generate electricity only," he said. "Anytime you burn a fuel to manufacture electricity, there's a certain fraction of energy that is discarded into the surroundings. In Denmark, they have district heating, where the local utility company sells two things -- electricity and heat."

America's energy consumption is disproportionately higher than any other country in the world, Prengle said. On a per-capita basis, Americans use about two times more energy than any other country in the world. "America has always had an abundance of energy," he said.

However, the 1972 OPEC oil embargo made Americans realize energy was not coming from domestic sources, Prengle said.

"We were buying from the Middle East because they have large oil reserves and lower prices. This is the free market theory -- you buy things where you get the best price," he said.

Since the embargo, however, Americans have become less dependent on foreign oil sources, he said.

"Since the OPEC embargo, we have carefully begun to wean ourselves away from Persian Gulf oil because of security risks," he said.

One of the security risks is the black oil market in Rotterdam, Holland, known as the spot market, he said. "Energy people follow the spot market carefully. For example, each OPEC nation has a certain quota of oil it can sell. If the posted price of oil is $20 per barrel, and you buy in Rotterdam for $18 per barrel, someone is cheating," Prengle said.

"So after the oil embargo, all the rest of the companies got hip to the jive and started massive energy conservation programs," he said.

Energy conservation has also become important in the motel business. "La Ouinta motels, which primarily operate in the Sun Belt, started a program about 10 years ago to heat their pools and also the water that circulates through the motel with solar panels," Prengle said. This process uses the panels on top of the building to catch sunlight and convert it into energy.

Other methods of energy conservation are employed by the automotive industry. "In the early '70s, this was not very energy efficient industry. They built big automobiles, the so-called `gas guzzlers' that only got 15 to 20 miles per gallon. Today we have cars that get 30 or more miles per gallon. This is because of the redesigning of the aerodynamics of the automobile. They've also built smaller engines which require less gas to run the car. Rear-wheel drive is almost but a thing of the past. Front-wheel-drive cars improve the miles per gallon also," Prengle said.

 

******************************************************

******************************************************

 

ALL THAT JAZZ

The University of Houston Jazz Ensemble and Jazz Orchestra, under the direction of Noe Marmolejo will perform tonight at 8 p.m. in Cullen Performance Hall.

The program includes pieces or arrangements by Sammy Nestico, Mike Loveless, John Berry, Thad Jones and Bob Mintzer.

General admission is $5, $3 for students and senior citizens. Tickets are avilable at the door.

hed for jazz page 7

All that jazz

 

******************************************************

******************************************************

 

BARNETT KEEPS PROMISE TO CUT ATHLETIC DEFICIT

BY DEBBIE HOUSEL

DAILY COUGAR STAFF

With the recent cancellation of $2.5 million from its deficit, the UH Athletic Department is striving to balance its budget by 1995.

When UH President Marguerite Ross Barnett arrived on Sept. 1, the athletic deficit was $4.6 million, which she has reduced to its current level of $2.1 million.

Before 1981, when there were yearly athletic deficits, donations were used to offset them and balance its budget, Barnett said.

But when these donations ceased, the athletic department's revenues failed to meet expenditures and the deficit began to accumulate, she said.

To compensate for the athletic department's shortfall, money was taken from units in the auxiliary fund group, of which the athletic department is a part.

These various units, such as Parking and Transportation, University Health Center and the University Center maintained claims on accounting records against the athletic department.

Administrative accounting records show the athletic department began fiscal year 1981 with a deficit less than $600,000.

The athletic deficit peaked in FY 1988 at $5.5 million, former Vice President for Administration and Finance Sharon Richardson said.

Barnett has maintained that with a deficit so large it would be improbable for the athletic department to repay these claims.

She said she wanted the units to understand these were just paper claims against the athletic department that represented money spent years ago.

Units that were identified for the reductions were ones with positive balances that did not have obligations on the money, Interim Vice President for Administration and Finance Robert Kerley said.

While attempting to wipe out the deficit, Kerley said, it's possible these same units or others ending in the positive could have additional monies taken from them.

The athletic department has a $7 million budget for FY 91 and the UH System has agreed to give $1.6 million to help the athletic department meet its operating expenses, Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance Edward Whalen said.

Whalen said the system will again help the athletic department through 1992, but the expectation and understanding is that the amount given will diminish.

Athletic Director Rudy Davalos said he is trying to keep the cost of athletics at a manageable level while bringing in more revenue.

In the next five years, there is a good chance that what the regents committed to balance the athletic departments budget will be reduced, he said.

Additional revenue may also be generated if UH appears in a bowl game or on television. Davalos said the Southwest Conference voted this fall to increase the amount of money to the schools participating in bowls and to increase the amount schools receive for national televised games.

These changes give the participating schools in the conference more money, but teams not chosen for bowls or TV appearances now receive less of the distribution shared by the conference, he said.

Ted Nance, assistant athletic director said, one reason for the increased deficit is prior to the year 1981 the athletic budget was not as large. One reason for the increase was UH expanded women's athletics, which he said brings in virtually no income.

Another reason for the higher deficit was the decline in season ticket sales in the mid '80s, although he pointed out sales are on the upswing again.

The average attendance at football games in the '60s and '70s was much larger. In 1968 home games were drawing more than 40,000 people, Nance said.

In 1986 the football attendance really dipped, Nance said. The football team had a losing record of 1-10 and attracted about 15,000 people to its home games.

"With the advent of women's athletics, the recession which eliminated some season tickets and cut down on outside contributions, the decline of the record of the team and the teams probation, all factored into creating a deficit," Nance said.

Nance is optimistic about the future.

"The teams have improved, the economy is coming back, and there is more interest -- everything runs in cycles," Nance said.

 

******************************************************

******************************************************

 

NEW ARCHI MINOR OPEN FOR STUDENTS

BY JUDY PACK

NEWS REPORTER

A minor in architecture recently approved by the undergraduate council will open new doors to UH students.

"This may be a vehicle for people who want to pursue architecture and possibly go into the master's degree studies," said Lannis Kirkland, assistant dean of architecture.

An architecture minor can also be a recruiting device, Architecture Dean Peter Wood said. Wood said the minor can serve as an introduction to architecture.

The minor program will be offered in Fall 1991.

Wood said he sees all kinds of students interested in taking courses in the minor field. While some students may be interested in architecture, they may be intimidated by the advanced math classes architecture majors are required to take. In this case they may find a minor more appropriate, he said.

The minor will also help transfer students fulfill core course requirements, he said. Wood added that the minor program has already aided one student in this situation and he is sure others will follow.

The minor program will include study of history survey, advanced history, urban structure architecture and structure courses with no numbers, Wood said, adding that the department may develop more courses.

The minor field of study may interest students studying interior design, technology, art history and engineering, Kirkland said.

Having an architecture minor could be a valuable asset for students in all majors. For example, Wood said a business school major with a minor in architecture could give the student a different way of looking at society and culture.

Kirkland said the plan for the minor program was presented to the undergraduate council approximately six months ago.

Wood also said the College of Architecture has suggested that the undergraduate council restrict the number of freshmen admissions to architecture.

"We have too many students to have open enrollment," Wood said.

Students arrive at UH with plans to study architecture and there is no room for them, he said.

Trying to deal with more students that there is room for in the classroom makes teaching more difficult, Wood said. He would prefer to see the department stay the same size and be a quality school.

 

******************************************************

******************************************************

 

AWARD-WINNING PHARMACY STUDENTS CONTINUE TO EXCEL

BY REBECCA DEATON

DAILY COUGAR STAFF

 

A UH School of Pharmacy student organization was honored with awards for achievement, improvement and membership during the American Pharmaceutical Association Convention in New Orleans earlier this month.

The UH chapter of the Academy of Students of Pharmacy competed for the awards with 74 other campus chapters throughout the nation. The active campus chapter has helped to get the school of pharmacy the national recognition it deserves, ASP President Keith Lewis said.

"When we used to go to these conventions, people would say `Oh, University of Houston has a pharmacy school?' " Lewis said. "Now they say `There's University of Houston.' "

The awards are only the latest in a list of ASP achievements that would be the envy of many other campus groups. One of the group's strengths is its active membership, Lewis said.

Students in the school of pharmacy have nine organizations from which they can choose. ASP's active recruitment program is partially responsible for its selection by most pharmacy students, Lewis said.

"It's been a lot of work to get a student to try and part with $35," he said. "But two years ago we began an active recruiting program."

In its recruiting efforts, the group stressed that it is an umbrella or all-encompassing organization, he said. When a student joins ASP, he or she automatically becomes a member of the national and state pharmaceutical associations.

From the 264 students listed on ASP's membership roster, it is obvious those recruiting efforts have paid off. The UH chapter has also won the membership award for the last two years, something no other campus chapter has done, Lewis said.

Once a student becomes a member, it is difficult not to become involved in the wide variety of programs. With faculty advisers who are active, we encourage the students to be active as well, Lewis said.

Among the programs ASP members participate in, is the "brown bag" program. These are patient counseling sessions in affiliation with Kroger Supermarkets.

"Kroger puts out the information to people who come into their pharmacies and on certain days we come in to advise their customers on the medications they are taking," he said.

This program helps prevent drug interactions and encourages patients to take their medications correctly. This is particularly important for elderly patients and those who see a number of doctors, Lewis said.

Another active ASP program is Casa Juan Diego, a Heights area mission for indigents from South America.

Last month on Pharmaceutical Legislative Day, the chapter had more than 60 members in Austin to lobby state representatives on behalf of their profession. Lewis said more than half the pharmacy students who went to the state capital that day were from UH, despite the fact that University of Texas has a school of pharmacy in the city.

During a recent ASP luncheon meeting, approximately 100 members were advised on what to expect from a job interview by UH Professor William McCormick and the Upjohn Company's Pharmacy Science Liaison, Roy Sandoval.

Members are also active in attending regional and national conventions. The chapter sent 23 of its members to the New Orleans convention, Lewis said.

There is no single key to the success of their organization, Lewis said. It's a group of people who have been willing to work together to try and reach a goal, he said.

"I'm very proud to be associated with this organization and the University of Houston College of Pharmacy, and I'm glad to see they are getting the national exposure and recognition they deserve," Lewis said.

 

*******************************************************

*******************************************************

 

UH, RICE KICK OFF NEW SEASON TICKET PACKAGE

BY DEBBIE HOUSEL

DAILY COUGAR STAFF

Attempting to increase attendance in the stands, UH has teamed up with Rice University to sell Houston businesses block season tickets. "Usually Rice and UH fight for tickets in competition with one another. This results in corporations rejecting us,"????

because they say if they buy from UH they will have to buy from Rice," UH Athletic Director, Rudy Davalos said. He said he called Bobby Mays the athletic director at Rice and told him about his idea. Mays took the idea to Rice President George Rupp, Davalos said.Both Ruppe and UH President Marguerite Ross Barnett were excited about the idea, Davalos said.Further encouragement came from Houston Businesses and from the Greater Houston Partnership who thought it was a good idea, Davalos said.They are supportive of both schools and of helping solidify the South West Conference, he said.Davalos also pointed out that businesses that have University of Texas and Texas A&M supporters will be guaranteed a block of seats when the teams compete in Houston against UH or Rice.There will be three levels available for businesses to buy blocks of seats, he said.The first level will cost $20,000 and will include 150 UH football season tickets, 150 Rice football seasons tickets, 20 men's basketball season tickets to both and passes to women's volleyball and basketball games, Davalos.The other two levels, he said, have not yet been decided but will be reduced tiers from the first.Bobby May said the whole conference has attendance problems which needs to be addressed.They have been talking about the idea for a while but have really started work in the last two months, May said.The problem is freeing up enough time to pursue the plan, he said emphasizing that now is the time to move forward.Because of the amount of the season tickets, May said it is a tremendous value."We are really thrilled about the concept and idea for Rice, UH, and for the whole Houston community," May said. Attempting to fill the stadium is one of the ways the UH Athletic Department is trying to achieve a balanced budget by 1995, Davalos said.Since the UH Football team's probation has ended, another lucrative possibility will be next seasons bowl games and coverage on national T.V., Davalos said.UH has already agreed on a national T.V. appearance playing the University of Miami on Sept. 12, he said.This game alone will net UH $560,000, Davalos said.If the UH football team continues winning, he said there is a possibility its games against Illinois, UT and A&M could be picked up by national T.V. If UH plays in a major bowl game, it would generate $250.000 in additional revenue, he said."The probation hurt us very severely. Half a million dollars was lost last year because we would have gone to a major bowl and loss of T.V. coverage," Davalos said.Much of his enthusiasm about next season revolves around the teams success this past season and because, he said, David Klingler is the number one contender for the Heismann trophy."Just because of him, if we start out right, T.V. will want to carry us because of David Klingler," he said."But," Davalos warned, "we have to stay competitive. Football and basketball have to stay competitive because these two carry the other 12."If they are not competitive, all the others will suffer terribly--the others don't make a penny," he said.ting tackle the problem of poor fan attendance,and Rice University have both colleges ,the to arebusketball season tickets to both, and an additional 200 tickets to a selective football game at both said.When UH games are televised the stations airing them receive high ratings, Davalos said adding T.V. is athletics salvation. Because of the low attendance at home, UH makes more money when it plays on the road, Davolas said. But the chances of winning are much better playing at home than playing on the road, he said.Even with the money generated from televised games, Davalos stressed that attendance needs to be up."We need to fill up the Astrodome because it will generate a lot of money. It would be a great thing to have that and T.V.," he said.

 

*******************************************************

*******************************************************

 

LAW STUDENTS WIN USING `SEX APPEAL'

BY DARLA ATKINSON

NEWS REPORTER

Eloise McGinnis and Aretha Mathis were found not guilty of prostitution while knowingly receiving an increase in pay for the sex acts performed in a movie.

Thanks to the work of Terri Thompson and Beth McCahill, the two "actresses" were set free on the defense that it is unconstitutional to prosecute actors and actresses for sex acts performed in movies in the Newell Blakely Mock Court Competition.

Thompson and McCahill, graduating law students, each received $150 for placing first among 64 teams in the UH Law School competition at Krost Hall. They also received $100 each for presenting the best brief.

Stephen Pipkin and Dennis Monaghan, second year law students, were the prosecutors for the state in this mock case. They won second place in the competition.

"The main objective of the competition is to strengthen and enhance appellate argument," said Tracey Batson, executive justice of Appellate Advocacy. "It also promotes student participation in school activities."

Texas Young Lawyers submit the case, which changes to civil from criminal every year, to the Advocacy Office. The students have a week to write a brief to get in the competition, Batson said. They argue both sides as the petitioner and the respondent. The competition is double elimination, meaning that the team has to lose twice before they are out, she said.

"Each team has 30 minutes to argue their case," said Tracy Brown, executive justice of Membership and Finance. "They split the time up between the two with each speaking no more than 18 minutes but no less than 12 minutes. It's at the judges discretion to allow the student to continue after the time has expired."

Richard Countess, honorable judge in the mock court, said, "This is the most valuable program the school has. It gets the students out of the classroom and involved in a real courtroom setting."

"The students were great. I was extremely impressed with all of them," he said. "All of the judges agreed, that if any one of them submitted an application to our firm, we would hire them immediately."

Monaghan said the trial was a good round of competitive law. He encouraged all law students to compete in the appellate competition.

"We did a lot better as a team. There was a certain bond between us that made it easier," Thompson said. Thompson and McCahill said they were going to throw a party with their prize money for all of their friends who supported them throughout the competition.

 

******************************************************

******************************************************

 

DEAD STUDENTS PROTEST DRUNK DRIVING TODAY

BY ANA M. TREJO

NEWS REPORTER

Do not be alarmed today when students wearing black T-shirts that read "I'm dead" stand up in the middle of class.

Junior Michael Chappell, a member of Boost Alcohol Conscienceness Concerning University Students (BACCHUS), said members of the group will be wearing the T-shirts, which will read on the back that "Every 22 minutes someone dies in an alcohol-related accident."

"Since someone dies every 22 minutes, every 22 minutes a student is scheduled to display himself on campus wearing an `I'm Dead' T-shirt," said Chappell, a junior business major.

BACCHUS, which is named after the Greek god of wine, has named March 20 as Dead Day, Chappell said. BACCHUS attempts to combine responsibility with alcohol consumption, Chappell said.

Joanne Note, a campus activity advisor, said BACCHUS is a national organization on 400 campuses and is sponsored by Chrysler. UH started its chapter last semester.

BACCHUS offers students positive, healthy choices and incorporates alcohol awareness to persuade students to not drink and drive, Note says.

Don Schaper, a hotel and restaurant management major, is promoting Dead Day by passing out buttons sponsored by the Student Program Board. He says he is working with Rother's Bookstore to donate the T-shirts.

"I lost two high school friends to alcohol-related accidents. Now that I'm in Sigma Phi Epsilon, I want to project that not all frat members are senseless," Schaper said.

BACCHUS executive director Dylan Moore is responsible for the flyers and banners that say, "Dead Day is Coming!"

"I'm trying to intrigue students' awareness," said Moore, a graphic communications major.

Chappell, a non-drinker, said the group has 25 members. "We really need more students and organizations to participate on Dead Day to effectively relay the message."

 

*******************************************************

*******************************************************

 

READY FOR R&R? OVERWORKED STUDENTS FANTASIZE ABOUT BREAK

BY ARDI DWORNIK

NEWS REPORTER

Having trouble deciding what to do for Spring Break? If you really want to be extravagant, kick back for a week in some five-star hotel in Paris, London or Hong Kong.

It is the rare UH student who can make such plans, however.

Many UH students say they will be staying in Houston next week and plan to sleep in and catch up on homework. A couple of days in Galveston or South Padre also rank high on the list.

Catching up on sleep is a must for Stephanie Hoogendoorn, a junior chemical engineering major, who also plans to "see some good movies and go canoeing in Clear Lake." If she had a choice, Hoogendoorn said she'd go to the Orient.

Deel Szeklinski, a junior construction management and technology major, said he plans to go to San Antonio "to be a tourist for a couple of days." Szeklinski said studying is definitely not on his Spring Break agenda.

Psychology Senior Cristine Garcia plans to do some serious studying. "I want to start a couple of papers that are due at the end of the semester," Garcia said. She expects to graduate this summer.

Khaled Tabbaa, a business sophomore, is taking a break from studying and going to Las Vegas, San Diego and Palm Springs. Tabbaa didn't hesitate when asked about his ideal Spring Break vacation. "I'd go to the Far East or to Italy, or on a cruise to the Bahamas," Tabbaa said.

June Coazum, a senior psychology major, plans to go to Padre for three days and "stay here the rest." She said she will study during the rest of spring break.

Whatever you do, the week will undoubtably fly by. Get some R&R while you can.

 

*******************************************************

*******************************************************

 

MELODY MAKERS

The UH School of Music will present violist Lawrence Wheeler and pianist Ruth Tomfohrde in a recital of 20th century music 8 p.m. Thursday in Dudley Rectial Hall.

Works to be performed are Sonata No. 2 by Bohuslav Martinu; Sonata, Op. 147 by Dmitri Shostakovich and Suite for Viola and Piano by Alexander Tcherepnin arranged by Lawrence Wheeler.

General admission is $5, $3 for students and senior citizens. Tickets are available at the door.

 

*******************************************************

*******************************************************

 

MAIN STREET THEATER SHOWS A SERIOUS SIDE

BY SALLY POUNCY

DAILY COUGAR STAFF

Money makes the world go round.

The play Serious Money, at Main Street Theater, mocks the "greed is good" attitude of the yuppie generation who thought life was wonderful until Boskey got caught.

Set London, the play centers around the fast-paced world of the international stock exchange. The main characters of the production are the obscenely rich corporate excutives who trade stock on the London International Financial Futures Exchange (LIFFE). The acronym fits this play well. All of the characters are engrossed with trying to underhandly make more money than the competition and will go to any length to do so.

The play works much like the movie Wall Street: young guy tries to make it in the big league, but gets caught at insider trading. However in Serious Money the young guy dies, and leaves the others to scratch, claw, and cover their collective butts to keep from being prosecuted by the British authorities on counts of ilegal trading.

Director Robin Robinson uses an inventive method of scene change in this production. She choreographs the set changes to Rock'n Roll. Making the changes look more like dances than the traditionaly cumbersomb, lights-out-find-the-glow-tape- and-drop-the-prop method. The use of popular music in the production does not subtract from it, rather by using tunes with money influenced choruses it only enhanced it.

The actors speak with cheezy British accents which when compounded with the fact that the lines were written in verse, make for a somewhat difficult interpretation. However, the play did not suffer ostentatiously from this linguistic handicap.?????

ACTORS' NAMES

 

*******************************************************

*******************************************************

 

VERSATILE SAIGON KICK MIXES METAL WITH WACKINESS,SOME SURPRISES

BY EVA MARUSAK

DAILY COUGAR STAFF

Although they aren't really heavy metal and they could easily pass for radio rock, Saigon Kick is a good group able to handle diverse sounds.

Something original has finally revealed itself in Saigon Kick's self-titled debut album. This versatile group easily blends hard rock songs with Beatlesque ballads sung in semi-decent lyrics.

The album opens up with "New World," a nice tune with a middle eastern flair. Lead vocalist Matt Kramer takes a chance and attempts to sing in that same middle eastern style, but comes out sounding warbly and screechy.

Everything soon remedies itself with "What You Say," a hard guitar song about life's little contradictions. Kramer finds his real voice with this tune and sticks to it from here on out.

"Colors" is a strong ballad that shows off the group's musical ability and sweet harmonies. But this is only the initial indication of their versatile musical ability.

Saigon Kick takes a walk on the wild and wacky side in the bizarre ballad "Month Of Sundays." Any rock group that can incorporate a kazoo solo in a ballad deserves a superfluous Parental Discretion Advisory sticker.

But the wackiness doesn't end here. The Kick boys quickly swing into a frenzied overdrive with "Ugly," a charming Dr. Seuss tune about murder and suicide. A sense of humor is required for lyrics like "Charlie, Ted and the son of Sam/They all ate green eggs and ham." Good eatin' huh?

Jason Bieler, guitarist and vocalist, does a good job on guitar. He is helped along by Michael Wagener, the multi-talented unofficial fifth member.

Bassist Tom DeFile is rather quiet and unobtrusive, something which is not necessarily a good thing. What Saigon Kick really needs is a more prominent bass line to even out Phil Varone's drumming.

Saigon Kick is a different group with an original sound and a shining example of risk taking at its finest. With their versatile sound they should appeal to a broad range of listeners.

 

*******************************************************

*******************************************************

 

BY MICHELLE DUMAINE

NEWS REPORTER

After nine years, Ram Dass, psychologist, philosopher and one of America's foremost spiritual teachers, will revisit UH.

When Dass was in Houston in 1982, the Cullen auditorium sold out for his one-night lecture.

"Generally, he sells out wherever he goes," said Lex Gillian, a representative of the Yoga Institute and Bookshop, which is helping to organize the workshop.

Dass has practiced and shared his spiritual insights on yoga and meditation for 20 years. He created the Hanuman Foundation, an organization that educates and trains individuals to increase their spiritual well-being.

It is the organizing vehicle for Dass' lectures and workshops, as well as for the publishing of his writings and tapes.

Dass also co-founded the Seva Foundation, an international service organization dedicated to alleviating suffering.

"Ram Dass is one of the most popular eclectic spiritual teachers on the circuit. Dass teaches and lectures worldwide," Gillian said.

The weekend workshop, "Reminder Reunion Reawakening and Renewal," will include four lectures. The first, "Karma Yoga," teaches how to use experience as spiritual practice.

"Be Here Now" focuses on staying centered despite internal and external turmoil. "How Can I Help?" contains information on fulfilling man's role as healer. The final lecture, "The Way of the Intuitive Heart," is about different oriental philosophies, such as Tao, Hsin-Hsin and Kabir.

"This workshop will be an opportunity to learn and strengthen practices that help us invest our daily lives with living truth, deepening compassion and healing," Dass said.

This weekend workshop will take place Saturday and Sunday from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. each day, at the UC Houston Room.

Dass also trains AIDS volunteers and works with the terminally ill. He provides guidance for high school students involved with ecological and social issues.

Anyone wanting to attend the weekend session, which costs $110, can purchase a ticket at the door of the Houston Room Saturday.

 

*******************************************************

*******************************************************

 

FAMED SPIRITUAL TEACHER `REAWAKENS` AT UC

MICHELLE DUMAINE

NEWS REPORTER

After nine years, Ram Dass, psychologist, philosopher and one of America's foremost spiritual teachers, will revisit UH.

When Dass was in Houston in 1982, the Cullen auditorium sold out for his one-night lecture.

"Generally, he sells out wherever he goes," said Lex Gillian, a representative of the Yoga Institute and Bookshop, which is helping to organize the workshop.

Dass has practiced and shared his spiritual insights on yoga and meditation for 20 years. He created the Hanuman Foundation, an organization that educates and trains individuals to increase their spiritual well-being.

It is the organizing vehicle for Dass' lectures and workshops, as well as for the publishing of his writings and tapes.

Dass also co-founded the Seva Foundation, an international service organization dedicated to alleviating suffering.

"Ram Dass is one of the most popular eclectic spiritual teachers on the circuit. Dass teaches and lectures worldwide," Gillian said.

The weekend workshop, "Reminder Reunion Reawakening and Renewal," will include four lectures. The first, "Karma Yoga," teaches how to use experience as spiritual practice.

"Be Here Now" focuses on staying centered despite internal and external turmoil. "How Can I Help?" contains information on fulfilling man's role as healer. The final lecture, "The Way of the Intuitive Heart," is about different oriental philosophies, such as Tao, Hsin-Hsin and Kabir.

"This workshop will be an opportunity to learn and strengthen practices that help us invest our daily lives with living truth, deepening compassion and healing," Dass said.

This weekend workshop will take place Saturday and Sunday from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. each day, at the UC Houston Room.

Dass also trains AIDS volunteers and works with the terminally ill. He provides guidance for high school students involved with ecological and social issues.

Anyone wanting to attend the weekend session, which costs $110, can purchase a ticket at the door of the Houston Room Saturday.

 

*******************************************************

*******************************************************

 

OSCAR CONTEST TIME: ENTER NOW

OK folks, we are not pleased with the first day's response to our Academy Award Contest. Did anybody see the entry form on page seven yesterday?

Need we remind you there are prizes involved? Granted, they aren't spectacular (tickets to Fitzgerald's and promotional CD's from MCA) but we thought they would be an incentive for someone out there.

A correction: the deadline to drop off an entry form here at Entertainment Central (room 151 of the Communication Building) is March 22, not April 22. The Awards are over Spring Break,(on March 29th) so we will announce the winner in our April 2 issue.

And for those who missed it, the form appears again today on the opposite page. Make your guesses, put your scissors to use and bring the form to the Cougar. We'll also print the form in tomorrow's edition.

This year's theme at the Awards ceremony (on ABC at 8 p.m.) will be 100 Years of Film. Madonna is slated to perform and Billy Crystal will return as host.

As you read this, preparations are underway at the Shrine in L.A. for what promises to be another, overblown, over-choreographed show that will no doubt run overtime.

But, hey, everybody watches the Oscars (what else are you going to do on a Monday night?) so don't be afraid to make your predictions before it's too late to astonish everyone with your amazing Oscar intuition.

--Jerry Parra

 

******************************************************

******************************************************

 

PANEL HOPES DISCUSSION WILL HELP ABOLISH `HOMOPHOBIA'

BY TROY CHRISTENSEN

NEWS REPORTER

Freedom can be ensured only if Americans can overcome intolerance of differences, the president of the Houston Gay and Lesbian Political Caucus told students in the Moody Towers Commons Monday.

GLPC President Larry Lingle and a panel of speakers also from GLPC were invited by Mitch Rhodes, a resident advisor, to answer questions about homophobia.

Rhodes, a chemical engineering senior, said there is a high degree of homophobia, or intolerance of gay and lesbian people, in the residence halls.

"(Homophobia) is especially prevalent on all-male and all-female floors like the ones in Moody Towers, because if one person is seen as different, everyone else is going to stay away from him or her," Rhodes said. "People don't understand homosexuality and they are scared by what they are not familiar with."

Dennis Spencer, a former president of GLPC, said homophobia is not much different than suspicion or hate of those with different views about things like race or women's issues.

"We are like no other minority because you would never know we're gay by looking at us. You can hide it for years, but when you feel the need to be with someone of the same sex, it's very hard," said Bill White, another member of GLPC.

Spencer said attitudes are changing in large urban areas like Houston. A discussion of homophobia would have never taken place here 30 years ago, he said.

Spencer said he believes Glen Maxey, who was recently elected to the Texas House of Representatives, will serve as a positive role model in the state. Maxey was the first openly-gay person elected in Texas.

However, a new wave of harassment toward gay people has been justified because the gay community is blamed for the AIDS crisis.

"AIDS is just a disease -- it's not a gay disease. No matter who you are or what you are, you must only have safe sex," White said.

Lingle said, "In the '60s and '70s, gay people were more promiscuous than they are now. It was the early days of gay liberation and some people had the attitude of `we're free and we're free to have sex.' " However, Lingle said more than 50 percent of new cases of AIDS have been found among heterosexuals.

Religion has discriminated against gay people for a long time, White said.

"I can't imagine how religion could teach love so much then say you're going to hell for loving someone," he said.

Asked whether he knew that being gay is unpopular and that he would get harassed for it and have to bear the hatred, Lingle said, "It's not the gay person's fault that he or she is gay. It's society's fault that they can't accept it. Society should thrive on its differences, not try to suppress them."

White said suppression of homosexuality can become destructive when a man is attracted to other men and is scared by the attraction because of past information. White said he might be driven to suppress his homosexuality and try to prove his masculinity by abusing his wife or other homosexuals.

Rhodes said he has never seen physical harassment of gay residents as a resident advisor at UH, but he has heard of jokes and attitudes against gay people. "When the joking and remarks are excessive -- when they reached a problem level -- I put on a program so we could face the issue head on," Rhodes said.

"I'm glad a lot of the guys from my floor were here," Rhodes said. "Earlier they were saying, `Oh, we don't want to see the fags,' but they came and their attitudes were changed. I think they were really impressed."

 

Visit The Daily Cougar