DON'T WATCH NEWWORK TV; RENT A VIDEO

BY SALLY POUNCY
DAILY COUGAR STAFF

Welcome back to the grind, Cougars. Once again a semester is beginning, and students will be forced into standing in mile-long lines at add/drop, late registration and, worst of all, the bookstore.
After standing on your feet for hours, do yourself a favor. Sit down in front of the television and pretend you are some sort of vegetable. However, if you are sick of network television, or just can't stand to watch one more music video on MTV, run to your local video store and rent a new release. The summer movies are out on video and are just begging to be seen.
Thelma and Louisetops this list of must-see videos because it's not every day you can rent a movie about two women who act just like men.
These two leave their husband and boyfriend to have a weekend just for the girls. Only their weekend takes a strange turn at the first place these two stop. From that point on, Thelma and Louise are on the run trying to stay one step ahead of the law.
This video is funny and touching, but watch out for the ending; it will surprise you.
Point Break will delight Keanu Reeves and Patrick Swayze fans. The film is about an FBI agent who poses as a surfer in order to catch a group of bankrobbers. The only problem is the surfers the FBI agent befriends are adrenalin junkies and almost get him killed several times. The action scenes are great. Pay close attention to the foot chase. You'll get a great appreciation for some of the front and back yards in Houston.
Bill and Ted hit the small screen in Bill and Ted's Bogus Journey. The loveable twosome are killed by mechanical look-alikes sent from the future and are forced into playing games with Death in order to return to life and save the world.
Leslie Nielsen returns to television as Lieutenant Frank Drebin in the video version of The Naked Gun 2 1/2: The Smell of Fear. Priscilla Presley, O.J. Simpson and George Kennedy return along with Nielsen to fight to protect the environment from a nemesis who does not care about life on planet Earth.
The ever-controversial Spike Lee has just released his film about inter-racial relationships, Jungle Fever, on to the video market. The film is about a black architect who has an affair with his Italian secretary and how others react to their relationship.
Backdraft is too hot to miss. The Chicago fire department is having trouble finding out who is bumping off people and charbroiling his victims with fire. Kurt Russel and William Baldwin star.
These are only a few of the titles available now on video cassette, so if you own a VCR or know some one who does, rent one of these movies and relax after a long day at UH.
 

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RICKIE LEE GOES POP POP

BY SALLY POUNCY
DAILY COUGAR STAFF

"Students should quit school and start a revolution," said Rickie Lee Jones in a recent phone interview.
With her new CD Pop Pop out and a tour on the way, Jones talked about her life and the new release.
As a mother of a three-year-old, Jones said the duties of motherhood have kept her out of the studio.
"I have a kid to take care of," she joked, adding, "I have not written in years, and part of writing songs is keeping things in, so I waited until I had something to say before I began writing again."
The things she has to say on Pop Pop are vast and varied. Jones recorded songs from the 1920s, '50s, '60s and an assortment of Broadway show tunes. "I Won't Grow Up," from Peter Pan, shows up with Jones' child-like vocals, sounding as if she indeed has not grown up. However, everyone knows she has.
Jones also recorded the Jefferson Airplane song, "Up From the Skies," which was written by Jimi Hendrix.
"I liked the song," she said. "Originally, I wanted to do `Voodoo Chili' because I love to sing along to Hendrix, but Mike O'Neil suggested `Up From the Skies.' All the guys in the band knew it so we started recording right away.
"However, something didn't sound right, so Robben (Ford) called his wife and had her play the song to him over the phone. We learned the key change that was missing and recorded it with the change. That is what you hear on the record."
Pop Pop is a cover album that takes a different path down memory lane via acoustic guitar.
"I think one of the things that the album is trying to do is not doing things that have already been done," Jones said. "It is really minimal and that is what I like.
"I'm not trying to make a statement," she said. "I think I'm creating a style."
Already a longtime cult favorite, Jones' style finally got her widespread national attention with the hit song, "Chuck E. is in Love," back in the early '80s.
"It's really a drag to have one hit record; it could become a novelty," she said.
Jones last tour was in 1989.
"It depends on the audience. If they are really loving it, it's really nice."
She claims her attitude has changed since she first started touring.
"I think the reason it (her attitude) has changed is because the audience is paying a lot of money to see me."
At one show on her last tour, a strange thing happened during the show.
"This woman walked down to the stage with a bouquet of flowers, set them on the stage and turned around and walked away, never saying a word," Jones said. She then added it was one of the most pleasing things she remembered about an audience.
When asked what type of advice she would give to struggling musicians, she seriously replied, "I do not feel qualified to give any advice.
"Someone gave me advice when I was starting out, but I don't remember it."
 

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COLLEGE NOT JUST FOR KIDS
TREND OF RETURNING STUDENTS NATIONWIDE

COUGAR NEWS SERVICE

Caryl Ann Minor's amusement is obvious as she recalls a run-in she had years ago, at the age of 50, in freshman English with a "cute young man" about 19 years old.
"He was the nicest, most sincere young man," the 55-year-old graduate student said, "and he came up to me after class and said, `Would you mind me asking what you are doing here?"
"I said that this is something I always wanted to do. You think you kids are the only ones who can do what you want to do?"
With millions of people like Caryl Ann Minor going back to school, that question is slowly fading from higher education. Older students are returning to the classroom in unprecedented numbers.
According to 1989 Census Bureau information, 3.3 million college students were age 30 or older -- double the number 15 years ago. In 1989, one of every five women in college was 35 or older.
Now, the National Center for Education Statistics reports that 43 percent of all college students are 25 or older, up from 39 percent in 1981. Estimates for 1992 expect the enrollment of students 25 or older to bypass the 7 million mark.
One researcher at the NCES offered an explanation for the flood of older students. "One of the things that happens, the economy slows and people will return to school," he said.
Others agree.
"We have seen for a long time that when the economy goes down .. a lot of people cycle back into the university," said Kay Holmberg, adult student program coordinator at Iowa State University. Not only does it buy time while the economy recovers, Holmberg said, but returning to school "increases their chances in the job market," which is becoming more competitive.
Although economic hardship is one common explanation for the phenomenon, it is certainly not the only one, nor is it the most popular. Many of the students themselves say self-improvement and missed opportunities in their youth are perhaps the biggest motivating factors.
Minor worked with her husband to build a family fishing business off Lake Erie after the two married, when she was 17. Two children and more than three decades later, Minor longed to return to school.
"One fall, I looked out at the leaves falling and saw myself," she said. "I love my family ... but I let my real self get lost in the process of being a wife and a mom."
So Minor, who had not graduated from high school, enrolled in classes to earn her GED. Enrollment at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania soon followed.
Her success and enthusiasm led her daughter Shellie, then 34, to return to college as well. Mother and daughter graduated together -- Caryl Ann magna cum laude and Shellie with a 4.0 -- in May 1991. In September, Caryl Ann started graduate school at Purdue University.
In January 1991, Norman Tognazzini, who returned to college eight years ago at the age of 33, founded the National Association of Returning Students in Salem, Ore. NARS is a non-profit organization designed to offer financial and social support to older students and to help them understand the challenges of college.
"The one big thing is financial. Some people are giving up"X" amount of income by returning to school," Tognazzini says. "If it's a two-parent household, there's the stress and frustration that adds psychological pressure. Another problem is scheduling. If someone chooses to work, they need someone to work around them." Another problem is child care.
But, Tognazzini says that because the college population 25 or over numbers more than 7 million, colleges are more sensitive to needs of these students.
Holmberg says Iowa State's Adult Student Program is one of the earliest established, in place since 1967. Since then, the school has implemented numerous programs for adult students and has worked to establish finanacial aid packages, one-on-one advising and counseling seminars, and revamped student scheduling to help accommodate older students' needs.
Companies are also aware of the personal needs and professional benefits of education and many are encouraging employees to return to college for advanced degrees. Many will pay tuition and grant a leave of absence. IBM Corp. is one example.
"It's like Rip Van Winkle waking up," Holmberg says. "Colleges and universities are now actively recruiting all students and in that sense, you will see universities making increased efforts" to reach older students. Especially since "the high school population has dried up" and budget cuts have hurt institutions financially, she says.
Older students say faculty and administrators need to adjust to their presence.
"They need to recognize that the individuals are, for the most part, giving up a great deal to be in their classroom and that the typical adult student will bring a lot of experience into the classroom," Tognazzini said.
 

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NEW FACULTY SENATE PRESIDENT FACES CHALLENGE

BY CROSBY KING
DAILY COUGAR STAFF

Of the many challenges facing the new president of the Faculty Senate, a crucial one will involve seeing UH through the gloomy economy.
Bill Cook, professor of mechanical engineering, assumes his duties Wednesday. He said the greatest issues confronting the 64-member body always concern finances -- and some hard choices await the university.
"With hard times coming on again, do we eliminate some programs?"Cook asked.
He said that in 1985-86, when UH felt the sting of the local bust economy, it purged several programs to cut its losses. The College of Technology no longer offers classes such as typewriting or bookkeeping.
An alternative to dropping programs is making them more efficient, he said. An example: videotaping a lecture for use in more than one class.
As a third possibility, Cook said the university could try to increase enrollment. But he added that a higher number of students could reduce the quality of instruction, while scaring away prospective faculty members.
Another grievance shared by many instructors is the recurrent issue of salary compression.
This entrenchment of the salary scale occurs when new faculty members are paid wages comparable to those received by tenured professors. Cook attributed the compression at UH to the university's expanding mode and its poor financial health.
Cook said UH has lost 20 percent of its faculty in the last seven years and bringing the student-teacher ratio back up to where it was will be difficult.
"We need more faculty, but when you hire more faculty, there go your pay raises."
Cook has dealt personally with the faculty crunch. Before 1984, he taught two sections of the same class. Then enrollment dropped, and he was forced to combine the two into one. When enrollment picked up again, Cook found himself teaching to a large number of students in one section.
He said he was not overburdened with the bigger class, but felt sympathetic toward other instructors.
"Some people teach a lot better if they have 20 rather than 50 students -- when they can have more eye contact and an exchange of ideas with students," he said.
Cook stressed that the Senate is not a monolithic ruling body, but part of a "shared governance,"an informal body involved in the decision-making at the university.
Cook has taught here since 1968. His research involves acoustics and helps mechanical engineers design quieter rooms. He said the ultrasound techniques he uses are similar to, but more powerful than, those used in defining a fetus within its womb.
 

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JOHNSON'S VAST MISSION REACHES COLLEGE CROWD

COUGAR NEWS SERVICE

Magic Johnson's message has hit home loud and clear--AIDS spares no one. Are college students getting the message?
Yes, say two researchers at Mansfield University in Pennsylvania. Immediately after Johnson said he had the disease, they conducted a survey of 612 students, asking one question: "Through which means do you think Magic Johnson contracted the HIV virus?"
About 87 percent answered "heterosexual sex."
Gale Largey, a sociology professor who conducted the survey with Professor Richard Fell, said she thinks the reason students answered as they did was because of "the strikingly strong credibility of Johnson. They really believed Magic."
That fact is significant, Largey said, because, "It's what (students) believe that impacts their behavior."
Researchers at the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction at Indiana University recently concluded a 1989 study of students' sexual behavior that they are preparing for publication.
Preliminary findings show that of the 651 undergraduate students surveyed at Indiana University, 81 percent of the men and 75 percent of the women were not virgins and that students spend an average of two nights a week with their sexual partners.
It also found that 50 percent of the men and 36 percent of the women had sex with someone they just met and that, on average, students had two one-night stands in 1990.
In March 1990, the Kinsey Institute published the results of a 1988 survey of 809 college students.
"The most important findings from this survey reveal that students engage in significant levels of unprotected sex, including anal intercourse; have multiple sexual partners and have sex with partners about whose sexual history they may know little," reads the article, written by the Kinsey researchers in "Focus: A Guide to AIDS Research and Counseling."
The study notes the typical respondent was 22, white, Protestant, politically moderate and from the Midwest, which means the information obtained is most likely on the conservative side.
The study also found that:
More than 90 percent of students were heterosexual. Of importance, researchers say, is that more than one-fifth of the heterosexual women and one-fourth of the heterosexual men reported engaging in anal intercourse.
In addition, 3 percent of the men who considered themselves heterosexual reported having anal intercourse with other men.
On average, sexually active college women reported having about six partners, including three one-night stands; men reported an average of about 11 sexual partners, including five one-night stands.
The type of relationship in which a person was involved at the time of the study--sexually exclusive, sexually non-exclusive or not currently in a relationship--was significantly related to some risk factors. For example, sexually active men in non-exclusive relationships reported the highest number of sexual partners--about 20. They also were more likely to engage in unprotected sex.
Since 1980, about 25 percent of college students surveyed said they had sex with someone from one of the 10 cities identified by the Centers for Disease Control as having the highest number of reported AIDS cases. About 30 percent of those students said they did so with a new partner.
"Given what is known about the conditions under which HIV may be most easily spread, there is cause to be concerned about heterosexual college students who engage in high-risk sexual activities," the researchers said.
Experts hope Johnson's campaign for safe sex will send a strong message to the college crowd. Others are joining his efforts.
In Detroit on Nov. 11, the Rev. Jesse Jackson announced his plans for a "New Attitude" movement that will try to teach behavioral change. Johnson has agreed to work with Jackson, and talk-show host Arsenio Hall has said he supports Jackson's campaign and may join his efforts to spread the word.
 

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STUDENTS, FRIENDS MOURN CAUX'S DEATH

BY MIKE OESER
DAILY COUGAR STAFF

Friends and students of UH associate drama professor Claude Caux are still reeling after his suicide on Jan. 10.
It was Caux's third attempt at killing himself since he allegedly stabbed fellow actress Mary Chovanetz to death in Memorial Park.
Caux, 57, was found dead hanging from the staircase of his southwest Houston condominimum by his wife Rose Marie and son Patrice.
Patrice also teaches at UH as a lecturer for the French department.
Sidney Berger, chair of the UH drama department, said, "It is terribly sad to add a second tragedy to the one that had happened in July." Caux was to direct a mime show on campus, which would have opened Jan. 31. Berger said the show had been cancelled, with no consideration given to finding a replacement director.
Berger added that a week before students began returning to school, many had already called or come by the drama department, expressing their concern and sorrow at the news.
Members of the UH Festival Mime troop, which was taught by Caux, held a memorial for him on Jan. 14.
"We love him, and we will always love him because the things he taught us were invaluable," a member of the troop said. "He opened up the world of art to us and how to use it in creating something beautiful."
Caux had taught stage combat, stage movement and mime at UH for 17 years until July 22, when he allegedly stabbed Chovanetz 15 times in the chest, abdomen and legs before turning the knife on himself.
Caux attempted suicide at the point of a knife again once he recovered from the first wound.
Since then rumors have abounded that Caux made amorous advances toward Chovanetz and that her spurning of these advances provoked the stabbing, but close friends and family of the two say they were only good friends.
Members of both families attended Patrice Caux's wedding shortly before the stabbing. The drama instructor's son was on his honeymoon when he heard of his father's arrest.
Houston Police Sergeant H. L. Mayer said, "We had heard the innuendo, but nothing was ever substantiated."
While Caux gave a taped confession to the police, he never told them what led to the argument with Chovanetz or the alleged stabbing.
"He told us over and over he did it but he didn't want to go into the details of why he did it. Said it was not the world's business why he did it but wanted us to know he did it and he stabbed himself," Mayer said.
A private funeral was held Jan. 13.
Belinda Hill of the District Attorney's office who was prosecuting the murder charges against Caux said the charges will be dropped once her office receives a death certificate.
 

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WORKING MOM STUDENT
MOM MAKES UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT

COUGAR NEWS SERVICE

In 1964, Rita Bornstein started performing one of the most challenging juggling acts of the 1990s -- a working woman raising two children while attending college as a non-traditional student.
Today, almost three decades later, Bornstein's work IS college.
The 55-year-old president of Rollins College in Winter Park, Fla., now finds herself in the position of dealing frequently with the needs of a growing student population with which she can readily empathize -- older students.
Although she had her first child at the age of 20, Bornstein said she never gave up the idea of returning to school to earn a college degree. "I always felt very strongly about it," she said.
At the age of 28, "I started taking courses slowly, I basically juggled that with my children."
Bornstein earned her bachelor's and master's degrees from Florida Atlantic University in English literature. Then she taught and worked as an administrator in the Miami school system for three years.
She later returned to the University of Miami and graduated with her Ph.D. in educational leadership at the age of 39.
"My children tell stories of remembering that Mom was always working on a paper or a project," she said. "They grew up with it."
At the University of Miami, Bornstein began building an impressive resume that included a five-year fund-raising campaign that secured $517.5 million for the school.
In reflecting on her own educational difficulties, Bornstein offers this advice to young women: "Don't get married first. Develop yourself as a person first. If you can't," she said, "then do what you can to get the education because it's a life-transforming experience."
 

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COUGARS NEED TO RAISE GAME LEVEL

BY JASON LUTHER
DAILY COUGAR STAFF

The UH men's basketball team is good, but just as with every other Houston sports team of all time, they can't win the "big" game.
After blowing out Villanova by 30 points, and leading then-fifth rank
ed North Carolina by 15 points at halftime, they scored only 23 points in the second period and blew the game and a chance for a national ranking.
The Cougars then regrouped to win their next eight, averaging 80 points a game and
winning by an average margin of 16 points.
However, in only their second true challenge of the season, the Cougars could muster only 56
points, losing to Denny Crum's Louisville Cardinal team and wasting their second opportunity to creep into the top 25.
Houston then took their frustrations out on Centenary, scoring a season-high 105 points, winning by 24.
The Cougars then traveled to Austin to face their first conference challenge, an 8-6 Texas Longhorn team playing without starting forward Dexter Cambridge.
Houston played the Longhorns to a 42 point deadlock at the half. And after they compiled a 64-61 lead mid-way through the second half, it appeared as if the Cougars had the momentum.
However, late in the second half, the Longhorns, led by reserve guard Tony Watson and a devastating press, went on a 16-5 rampage. Texas forward Benford Williams' slam with 3:26 remaining added the exclamation point and at 77-69, the game was out of reach for Houston.
The press wouldn't have been so crushing to the Cougars had not Houston center Charles Outlaw fouled out, leaving forward Craig Upchurch to take the burden with four fouls.
The Cougars never regrouped after losing Outlaw, and lost 75-86.
Houston did get its first conference win just three days later in a lackluster 83-77 win against Baylor in Hofheinz Pavilion.
The Cougars led by 11 at halftime, and expanded their lead to 13 with 17:34 remaining in the game.
However, Baylor guard David Wesley ignited and scored 11 straight points as the Bears closed to within one at 69-68.
But when Houston Coach Pat Foster adjusted and put the Cougars in a half-court press and man-to-man defense, the Cougars pulled to an 81-74 lead. The Cougar's have yet to rediscover the level of play that they found against Villanova and in the first half against North Carolina, a level needed to win the "big" games.
If they are to win the Southwest Conference and receive an invitation to the NCAA tournament, they must find that level and maintain it.
 

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THE FILM THAT WOULDN'T DIE
COPPULA'S THREE-YEAR ODYSSEY

BY SHANE PATRICK BOYLE
DAILY COUGAR STAFF

On Oct. 19, 1979, Francis Ford Coppola's epic film Apocalypse Now opened in theaters. The movie, set in the Vietnam War and loosely based on Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, took three years to film and would never have been finished if not for the determination of Coppola and his dedicated crew.
The story of this film-that-almost-wasn't is the subject of the documentary, Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse, which opened this weekend at the Greenway 3.
This film is not a simple special effects show as many "The making of ... " films are. It is a chronicle of the struggle to complete the film in spite of great difficulties. Opposition came in many forms, from the logistics of filming in the Philippines, to funding problems and Coppola's own dissatisfaction with the direction the story line was moving.
At one point, the Philippine government took away five helicopters in the middle of filming a scene to fight a rebel uprising. Then, a typhoon destroyed the sets, which included an entire village built for the movie.
The greatest opposition, however, came from within Coppola, who would not be satisfied with a movie that was done halfway. He adamantly insisted on translating his vision to film regardless of how long it would take. The vision was to create a film of epic proportions with all the intensity of Conrad's novel.
He also intended to draw parallels to The Odyssey, such as the inclusion of Playboy Bunnies, who Coppola says were intended as an allusion to the Sirens in Homer's epic.
Yet Coppola became increasingly unhappy with the script and continued revising until the end. At one point, he expresses his frustration by referring to the story as "The Idiodyssey."
The continued delays caused Coppola to lose popularity in the entertainment media and the film industry. Articles about the postponements shown in the film sported headlines like: "Apocalypse When" and "Apocalypse Forever."
When Hollywood lost faith in the picture, Coppola and his wife, Eleanor, sold their estate, which they had purchased with profits from the Godfather films, to finance the continued filming.
The documentary makes an attempt to create the analogy of Coppola journeying into his own heart of darkness. Coppola relates that there were times during the three-year filming that he contemplated suicide.
As the title implies with its plural nature, Coppola was not the only one who made the metaphoric journey inward to the darkest regions of the soul.
Actor Martin Sheen's efforts to literally become his character, Willard, or "look into the tiger's eyes," as Sheen puts it, led him to intense extremes with a drive to rival Coppola's. He talks about the drugs he took to get into character, including various combinations of alcohol, marijuana, speed and LSD.
When filming the Saigon hotel scene in which Willard flips out, Sheen was so drunk that some of the camera crew thought he might try to attack the camera. When Willard cut his hand, Sheen's blood was real.
Sheen pushed himself so far that he came close to death. He suffered a heart attack before the film was finished, but the cameras kept rolling.
Coppola and Sheen are the main focus of Hearts of Darkness, but other people involved in the film also relate their experiences, including Eleanor Coppola, Dennis Hopper, Douglas Claybourne, Marlon Brando and Animal Trainer Monty Cox.
This film is impressive in its detail, but it does operate under the assumption that the audience has seen Apocalypse Now.
Anyone who has not seen it should consider renting it before watching Hearts of Darkness. Familiarity with Conrad's Heart of Darkness is also helpful.
Don't worry. It's short, and once you read it you will be one step ahead of Marlon Brando.
 

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LADY COUGARS LEAD SWC

BY JASON LUTHER
DAILY COUGAR STAFF

The UH women's basketball team is off to its best start in school history with a 13-1 record.
In only her second year as head coach, Jessie Kenlaw has guided the Lady Cougars to a number 11 national ranking.
Through two years at UH, Kenlaw has compiled a 33-13 record. Her .717 winning percentage is the best mark of any Cougar women's basketball coach through as many games.
The Lady Cougars are led by 5-7 guard LaShawna Johnson and 6-3 center Darla Simpson.
Johnson, a senior out of Clements high school, is averaging 18.3 points per contest, including a season-high 34 against Middle Tennessee and 25 against North Texas.
Simpson is averaging 15.6 points and 9.5 rebounds per game, compiling a team high 14 boards against Texas.
The Lady Cougars won their first two conference games, defeating Texas 73-65 at home and Baylor 86-63 in Waco.
Houston is averaging 83.9 points per game this season, reaching the century mark twice in beating Prairie View 112-42 and Southwest Louisiana 101-56.
Kenlaw's fast-paced style of play has earned her six career 100-point games. Those games are among the top 11 outputs in UH history.
 

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COUNSELING AND TESTING FILM ON DATE RAPE SPARKS DIALOGUE

BY PAULA NAST
DAILY COUGAR STAFF

One in four women will be the victims of sexual assault in their lifetimes, according to Dr. Gail Hudson, staff counselor for UH Counseling and Testing Service.
Hudson said the average age of rape victims and rapists is 18.
This data suggests that college students are particularly vulnerable. Can students do anything to prevent rape?
Last summer, the Counseling and Testing Service put a videotape together that addresses this question. The tape was filmed on the UH campus. All the actors in the video are UH students.
"This is the first time we've actually had a good tool for stimulating discussion, and it's intended for mixed audiences -- not just men or women," Hudson said.
The tape is 11 minutes long and consists of five vignettes depicting potential rape situations. After each story, the group watching it discusses what they have just seen.
One of the stories that stimulates a great deal of discussion shows two men talking about rape.
One of the men comes back from a date and tells his roommate he has just "scored." The roommate congratulates him. As the two continue to talk, it becomes apparent that the female was not a willing participant. His roommate accuses him of rape.
"Many men are uncomfortable with this particular vignette," Hudson said. "They wouldn't know what to say to their friend. They wouldn't know how to approach this situation."
The hosts present during these screenings use the breaks between stories to address these kinds of issues and to create a dialogue between the men and women present.
"We are working to dispel myths, such as if you spend a lot of money on a woman, that entitles you to have sex with her. We are also trying to make people aware of how they get into certain situations. What to look out for."Hudson said.
For example, one of the stories shows a man and a woman at the library. They have just finished studying and he invites her back to his apartment. She is reluctant, but he does not appear to be hearing her objections.
That's a clue said Hudson.
"He is not listening to the woman. He should care about what she has to say."
If he is not listening to her objections, neither is she listening to her instincts.
"Women tend to ignore their instincts. They feel uncomfortable in a situation and don't know why. We encourage them to listen to their instincts."
Alcohol consumption can create problems in these situations.
According to Hudson, 75 percent of men and 50 percent of women involved in a sexual assault said they had been drinking.
One of the stories looks at this particular issue. A woman at a party becomes drunk and accepts a ride from a man. She passes out in the car and the man rapes her.
"We want people to plan ahead if they are going to be drinking. To know who is going to take them home if they get drunk," Hudson said.
"You can never keep yourself 100 percent safe, because it's not your fault. Society still promotes the idea that it is the woman's fault."
But Hudson believes things are changing.
"Traditionally, we allow men two outlets for emotions. One is aggressive behavior and the other is sexuality. We don't spend as much time allowing them to express themselves in more positive ways," Hudson said. "However, I am seeing more men on college campuses today that are rejecting traditional ideas."
So far, the tape has been shown to the resident advisors in the dorms, some of the dorm residents, the police department and those who have attended workshops put on by the Counseling and Testing Service.
"One of the issues we face is that 90 percent of the students are commuters,"Hudson said.
So she encourages faculty on campus to use the tape.
"We hope to be invited to classrooms," Hudson said. " We want to tell professors, `If you can't be at a class, don't cancel it. We will be glad to do a program when you are not there.'"
 

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WIRETAPPING COSTS $20,000 FOR E. CAROLINA UNIVERSITY

COUGAR NEWS SERVICE

East Carolina University has settled two lawsuits for $10,000 each and may deal with at least 15 more after a wiretapping scandal involving more than six administrators.
Now, some believe that the wiretapping discovered last fall in the school's Public Safety and Human Resources department was not an isolated incident.
A private attorney is investigating allegations of illegal wiretaps across campus that are unrelated to the 1990 wiretap case involving the former chief of Public Safety.
The initial lawsuit, filed by former chief of Public Safety, John Rose, claimed that several administrators illegally recorded his telephone conversations with Brooks Mills, a now-former telecommunications employee, without his consent during the summer of 1990.
According to the North Carolina State Auditor's report on the incident, Ted Roberson, former director of telecommunications, said he tapped and taped conversations on Mill's phone line because he suspected Mills had dealings with illegal drugs. Those allegations were never substantiated.
This October, the university stepped in to settle the lawsuit, filed by Rose against Roberson and Mills, to save time and money and because, according to university attorney Ben Irons, the university found that "no employee of the university acted with actual knowledge that he or she was violating the law."
The university paid Rose's settlement and the settlement of another employee, Lois Braxton, on the same charge on an illegal wiretap, out of a special university account that specifically handles legal settlements.
According to copies of the transcripts of the original wiretap, at least 15 additional people are entitled to settlements. Under federal law, a party whose oral communication is intercepted over a phone line without consent is entitled to $10,000 punitive damages.
An additional lawsuit has resulted from the wiretap. Capt. Stanley Kittrell of the public safety department, the man who discovered the transcripts of the wiretap and reported the information to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, claims he was punished by superiors for reporting the crime.
According to confidential information sent to the East Carolinian, Kittrell's office was moved from the Public Safety Building to a rarely used campus building shortly after he contacted the FBI in November 1990. Prior to the incident, Kittrell was in charge of 42 staff members, but his staff was reduced to zero after internal reorganizations in November last year. Also, before the incident, Kittrell was a plainclothes officer, but now he is required to wear a uniform.
Kittrell also alleges that the current Public Safety Director, James DePuy, broke into his office and "ransacked and searched" it.
The lawsuit, filed against the director of Public Safety, the assistant director of public safety, the chancellor and the vice chancellor of Business Affairs, has yet to be settled.
Although the State Auditor's office never discovered who ordered the initial wiretap, five administrators had explicit knowledge of the wiretapping, according to the auditor's report.
 

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KLINGLER TAKES ONE MORE BEATING IN HULA BOWL GAME

COUGAR SPORTS SERVICE

In the Hula Bowl in Honolulu Jan.11, former Houston quarterback David Klingler was playing behind a more experienced offensive line consisting of all seniors, but he felt right at home with the poor protection he received.
Klingler only played on one drive and was flushed out of the pocket five times and tackled twice for losses. Two of his passes were dropped, including one by former Cougar receiver John Brown III.
After the shaky start, Klingler threw a 28-yard completion to Washington receiver Mario Baily. He then scrambled twice for a first down which set up the West's first touchdown, a two-yard run by the game's offensive MVP, Derrick Moore of Northeastern State.
Klingler was hit hard twice as he was scrambling for the first down, receiving a bruised shoulder.
Accustomed to being banged up, Klingler removed himself from the game, opting for better protection in the Senior Bowl.
Along with Klingler and Brown, former Cougar offensive lineman Mike Gisler played in the game.
 

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SAE RECEIVES FOUR-YEAR PENALTY FROM LEADERS

BY REBECCA MCPHAIL
DAILY COUGAR STAFF

After years of trouble with neighbors and a recent, bizarre assault incident, the directors of the national Sigma Alpha Epsilon organization have closed the fraternity's UH chapter for four years.
The unanimous vote came in December after nearly continuous friction between SAE and its neighbors.
"They've been causing problems for years," said neighbor Paul Pendleton.
The final blow came last August when the tip of Carrin Huber's left pinky finger was severed during an altercation.
The severing occurred while Huber was trying to break up a fight between SAE President Stephen Ferro and Huber's boyfriend, Kevin Schramm.
Ferro was indicted for aggravated assault, a third-degree felony, which carries the maximum penalty of 10 years in prison and a $10,000 fine.
It will be the jury's duty to decide whether the injury to Huber's finger was intentional.
According to Ferro's lawyer, Joe Bailey, no trial date has been set; however, they expect one soon.
Bailey admits the prospect of a jail sentence sounds ominous, but judging from Ferro's previous lack of criminal activity, Bailey said, "He could get a probated sentence."
In spite of the serious nature of the charges, Bailey is not convinced SAE's national organization took the proper action. "They may well have over-reacted," he said.
The fraternity left them no other alternative, SAE Director of Chapter Development Mike Sophir said.
"The closing is due to a failure on the chapter's part to improve after repeated attempts to work with them addressing certain issues," he said.
He emphasized that the closing is not permanent and that the chapter will most likely re-open in the future.
"In four years, after a cycle of students passes through, we'll look at the dynamics of the student body," he said.
"It is our hope to re-colonize and start with an entirely new group of students," he said.
UH Vice President of Student Affairs Elwyn Lee is also satisfied with SAE's decision. "I'm pleased that the national office took its responsibility seriously and was actively engaged in an oversight role," he said.
However, Lee does not believe that this is a sign of things to come for all campus fraternities.
"UH is not anti-frat; in fact, they add a lot to the life of the campus," he said.
Even though the house is now vacant, SAE's former neighbors claim their troubles are still far from over.
Pendleton said he is dismayed that SAE may lease the house to a non-profit organization, such as a halfway house or drug rehabilitation center, instead of selling it.
"We view this not as a victory but as a defeat for both UH and the neighborhood," he said.
Bernard Middleton, another former neighbor of SAE and the president of the South MacGregor Civic Club, agrees with Pendleton. He admits that the neighbors are not ruling out the possibility of legal action in an effort to recoup their loss of property value.
Middleton said, "We will continue to defend against unlawful actions by SAE and their tenants."
 

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BARNETT'S TREATMENT WILL REQUIRE PERIODIC ABSENCES

BY DEBBIE HOUSEL
DAILY COUGAR STAFF

UH President Marguerite Ross Barnett will curtail her number of commitments this semester while undergoing treatments for a neuroendocrinological condition, officials said.
Associate Vice President for University Relations Wendy Adair said that although Barnett will be absent, she will be here more often than she is not.
"During this semester, she will probably undergo more than one treatment per month, which will require her to miss about a week each month," Adair said.
Barnett informed the campus community of the diagnosis in a Nov. 14 letter printed in The Daily Cougar, stating she would need to be away periodically from UH.
She also stated that Deputy to the President Tom Jones would carry out the routine administrative activities in her absence.
Barnett said she feels that her health is a private matter and would not elaborate on any details of her illness, which part of her body is affected, the type of treatment she is undergoing or where she is receiving her treatment.
"It is extremely serious and very difficult to treat successfully," Biology Chair Robert L. Hazelwood said.
Hazelwood explained "that while the term `neuroen-
docrine' may be used in several ways, it usually refers to the part of the body where an anatomical and functional relationship exists between nervous tissue and endocrine tissue."
He said such a situation exists in the area of the pituitary and hypothalamus gland in the brain.
The hypothalamus plays a significant role in the various experiences of behavioral patterns, he said, including emotions, reproductive cycles, hunger-satiety phenomenon, body temperature and others.
The pituitary gland responds to neural secretions from the hypothalamus by secreting its own hormones that reach distant tissues such as the thyroid, adrenal cortex and gonadal tissues.
The particular part where the two glands merge is located in the deepest part of the brain and is the least accessible part to evaluate, he said, adding that it does not regenerate.
The treatment for this area could involve chemotherapy, radiation or some other form of high-energy bombardment, he said.
Adair said that although Barnett will cut down on some of her external activities, the univeristy will be represented by one of the senior vice presidents or vice presidents, depending on the nature of the function.
However, Barnett will be present at some functions, including her second annual address to the community on April 2.
 
 

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