UH RESHAPING TO FEND OFF FUTURE STATE BUDGET WOES

By Meagan McGovern

Daily Cougar Staff

In the face of budget cuts that both UH and the state of Texas are facing, the new UH budget drawn up for the fiscal year 1993, which includes raising tuition for students, has many people on campus upset and worried about the future.

Schilt said in a presentation to the Board of Regents, "Our students will bear an additional expense." He said because of legislative mandate, tuition would be raised from $22 to $24 per credit-hour, increasing the annual tuition and fees at UH for full-time undergraduates to $1408.

Schilt added, "That is still almost the lowest college cost in the nation and less than many students will pay for their automobile insurance."

In the face of a proposed restructuring of the university to ward off probable state budget cuts in the next legislative session, raises are a big issue this year.

Because the restructuring is preparing for as much as a 10 percent decrease in funding, including scenarios that cut back some programs and streamline others, some faculty are disgruntled over the raises some athletics staff and UH-System administrators have received.

The budget includes a 1 percent across-the-board pay raise, which doesn't show up in the comparative figures since it took effect this month and is included in the UH FY '92 base budget, Schilt said.

But several system employees have been granted additional raises, causing a stir from the Faculty Senate. (See accompanying Faculty Senate story.)

Faculty Senate Chairman Bill Cook said that while several system employees are receiving large raises, those at the university level will receive none beyond that mandated by the state for all employees.

The Faculty Senate questioned such raises as Peggy Cervenkas', who received a 13.1 percent pay raise, to $45,000 a year from her previous salary of $39,780 as the Executive Administrator to the Chancellor/Board of Regents. The new budget lists "increased duties" as the reason for her salary raise.

Another position listed that raised discussion among the senators was that of Steven Green, who will receive $100,000 annually for his position as Chief Information Services Officer. According to a letter from Cook to the Board of Regents, Charles Shomper was hired at $93,000 to handle all Information Technology. Cook said Green's position is redundant, as all administrative computing is done on this campus, and therefore is under Shomper's direction. "Why," said Cook, "does the UH System need this $100,000 position?"

Cook and other members of the senate also questioned the need for a system "nestled in opulent surroundings and filled with overpaid administrators whose actions have no direct bearing on the quality or efficiency of delivering education to the students."

A presentation of the senate's feelings about the matter will be made at today's University Planning and Policy Council meeting, said Steve Huber, a member of the Faculty Senate and chair of the UPPC.

In response to one of Cook's letters, John Cater, chairman of the Board of Regents, said in a letter, "Personally, I agree. Competitive faculty salaries are critical to the future of the university and the city," adding later, "But we cannot defy current state funding constraints, especially when we are competing against other worthy public needs. We do find ourselves in a a challenging situation."

Several athletics staff, such as Assistant Football Coach Anthony Fitzpatrick and Head Basketball Coach Jessie Kenlaw received raises. Kenlaw's salary increased by $15,320 this year, a 43.7 percent raise, while Fitzpatrick's salary increased by $7,380, a 22.7 percent raise. Kenlaw's salary is now $50,347 while Fitzpatrick's is $42, 342.

UH President James Pickering said the athletics raises were to bring UH's athletics staff salaries up to parity with comparable staff at other universities.

Despite the impending state budget cuts, the system-wide budget projects $23.8 million more in available income this year over last year, Schilt said.

He added, "We are pleased to be doing this well, given current economic conditions," saying that the increase was "largely because of the skilled work of Governor Richards, Lieutenant Gov. Bullock," and others. Because of their work, the "disturbing forecasts of mid-biennium cuts have not come true."

Schilt said it is important now to understand that our universities are state-assisted, not state-supported, and that state support will rise by only 2 percent, while overall revenue will rise by 6 percent.

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UNIVERSITY BUDGET INCLUDES TUITION RAISES, PAY RAISES FOR SOME ADMINISTRATORS

By Meagan McGovern

Daily Cougar Staff

In the face of budget cuts that both UH and the state of Texas are facing, the new UH budget drawn up for the fiscal year 1993, which includes raising tuition for students, has many people on campus upset and worried about the future.

Schilt said in a presentation to the Board of Regents, "Our students will bear an additional expense." He said because of legislative mandate, tuition would be raised from $22 to $24 per credit-hour, increasing the annual tuition and fees at UH for full-time undergraduates to $1408.

Schilt added, "That is still almost the lowest college cost in the nation and less than many students will pay for their automobile insurance."

In the face of a proposed restructuring of the university to ward off probable state budget cuts in the next legislative session, raises are a big issue this year.

Because the restructuring is preparing for as much as a 10 percent decrease in funding, including scenarios that cut back some programs and streamline others, some faculty are disgruntled over the raises some athletics staff and UH-System administrators have received.

The budget includes a 1 percent across-the-board pay raise, which doesn't show up in the comparative figures since it took effect this month and is included in the UH FY '92 base budget, Schilt said.

But several system employees have been granted additional raises, causing a stir from the Faculty Senate. (See accompanying Faculty Senate story.)

Faculty Senate Chairman Bill Cook said that while several system employees are receiving large raises, those at the university level will receive none beyond that mandated by the state for all employees.

The Faculty Senate questioned such raises as Peggy Cervenkas', who received a 13.1 percent pay raise, to $45,000 a year from her previous salary of $39,780 as the Executive Administrator to the Chancellor/Board of Regents. The new budget lists "increased duties" as the reason for her salary raise.

Another position listed that raised discussion among the senators was that of Steven Green, who will receive $100,000 annually for his position as Chief Information Services Officer. According to a letter from Cook to the Board of Regents, Charles Shomper was hired at $93,000 to handle all Information Technology. Cook said Green's position is redundant, as all administrative computing is done on this campus, and therefore is under Shomper's direction. "Why," said Cook, "does the UH System need this $100,000 position?"

Cook and other members of the senate also questioned the need for a system "nestled in opulent surroundings and filled with overpaid administrators whose actions have no direct bearing on the quality or efficiency of delivering education to the students."

A presentation of the senate's feelings about the matter will be made at today's University Planning and Policy Council meeting, said Steve Huber, a member of the Faculty Senate and chair of the UPPC.

In response to one of Cook's letters, John Cater, chairman of the Board of Regents, said in a letter, "Personally, I agree. Competitive faculty salaries are critical to the future of the university and the city," adding later, "But we cannot defy current state funding constraints, especially when we are competing against other worthy public needs. We do find ourselves in a a challenging situation."

Several athletics staff, such as Assistant Football Coach Anthony Fitzpatrick and Head Basketball Coach Jessie Kenlaw received raises. Kenlaw's salary increased by $15,320 this year, a 43.7 percent raise, while Fitzpatrick's salary increased by $7,380, a 22.7 percent raise. Kenlaw's salary is now $50,347 while Fitzpatrick's is $42, 342.

UH President James Pickering said the athletics raises were to bring UH's athletics staff salaries up to parity with comparable staff at other universities.

Despite the impending state budget cuts, the system-wide budget projects $23.8 million more in available income this year over last year, Schilt said.

He added, "We are pleased to be doing this well, given current economic conditions," saying that the increase was "largely because of the skilled work of Governor Richards, Lieutenant Gov. Bullock," and others. Because of their work, the "disturbing forecasts of mid-biennium cuts have not come true."

Schilt said it is important now to understand that our universities are state-assisted, not state-supported, and that state support will rise by only 2 percent, while overall revenue will rise by 6 percent.

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PLANS UNDERWAY TO MAKE CAMPUS FACILITIES ACCESSIBLE TO DISABLED

Veronica Guevara

Daily Cougar Staff

Although UH is already more than 95 percent barrier-free, the Physical Plant, Office of Human Resources and the Center for Students with Disabilities (CSD) are in the process of implementing the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

The ADA, which took effect July 26, 1992, "gives comprehensive civil rights protection to individuals with disabilities in the areas of employment, public accommodations, transportation, telecommunications and state and local government services."

"Actually, these were mandated services in the Rehab Act of 1973," said Karen Waldman, coordinator for CSD, about the impact of the ADA at UH.

Don Green, assistant director of Architecture, Engineering and Construction Services (part of the Physical Plant), is currently involved in a preliminary survey of UH's campus barriers.

The survey concentrates on immediate steps to implement ADA: parking spaces and accessibility to buildings, entrances and exits, signs, elevators and restrooms.

"This is not a complete survey -- corridors, aisles, work spaces and individual spaces, access to rooms and hardware -- also need to be considered," Green added.

Green discussed door operators, which can cost from under $2,000 for a push-button one to as much as $10,000 for a fully automatic one, as an example of some costs that may be incurred.

"One needs to be innovative and thoughtful in approaching ADA compliance... it is not throwing money at the problem," Green stressed.

Waldman noted that many of the ADA accommodations are cost-free. "You can put four bricks under a desk so that a wheelchair can reach it, add speaker phones, give occasional work breaks and do job-restructuring," Waldman said.

Dr. Dorothy Caram, chairwoman of the ADA Implementation Committee, is preparing an ADA Survey of Programmatic Accessibility in order to elicit suggestions and recommendations from each of the colleges.

"To get input from as many sources as possible, I will suggest that each college have an open forum," Dr. Caram said.

Sandi Cherry of Human Resources, in charge of training (for ADA compliance), focuses on teaching faculty, staff and students to have an "open mind" to disabilities.

"There's no foot-dragging going on here," said Laura Rothstein, Law Center associate dean of student affairs, about the ADA Implementation Committee's dedication to full compliance.

Rothstein, who teaches a course on disabilities and the law, is proud of UH 's record as one of the top universities in the nation for facilitating people with disabilities.

"Not that there are not things that need to be improved," Rothstein added.

Dina Abramson, a senior elementary education major and a Handicapped Students' Advisory Board (HSAB) chairwoman, said that in terms of accessibility, "there's a world of difference between UH and other institutions."

Abramson looks forward to the positive effects of ADA on campus, hoping that all new buildings will have electric doors.

"I hope that we continue to be one of the leading institutions for students, faculty and staff with disabilities," Dr. Caram said.

The cost of the ADA's implementation should be determined within the next two weeks, following the Physical Plant's survey and the ADA Implementation Committee's survey, which will help to form an ADA budget.

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FACULTY SENATE CLAIMS ADMINISTRATORS OVERPAID AND RAISES UNNECESSARY

By Veronica Guevara

Daily Cougar Staff

Faculty Senate members are not pleased that raises for UH-System employees are in the 1993 budget.

Faculty Senate President Bill Cook reported on the UH System's fiscal year 1993 budget inclusion of "five to six pages of raises for the System's employees" at the Faculty Senate's monthly meeting August 26 in Farish Hall's Kiva room.

In a year of a prescribed "responsive reshaping" to combat the state's expected $5 billion shortfall for higher education, the buzz everywhere is about how to make do with the smaller amount of funds.

Following a report of a faculty and staff raise cap of 3 percent with no merit component, faculty senator Garth Jowett wondered whether "the anomaly was clear" to the UH System's budget maker.

Cook, reading from two letters addressed to regent Chairman John T. Cater, questioned "the hiring of a Chief Information Services Officer at an annual salary of $100,000" as well as "several employees of the System...receiving large raises while [those] at the university level receive none beyond that mandated by the state for all employees."

Included in Cook's letters were copies of the UH System Board of Regents' Personnel Recommendations, with notes from Cook on the raise percentages -- anywhere from 5 to 34 percent.

Cook also enclosed an article from The Chronicle of Higher Education noting the median salary increases for college and university administrators, reflecting the nationwide recession, were "the smallest in four years," with only a 2.6 percent this academic year.

In response to Cook's letter, which "somehow, Todd Ackerman (a Houston Chronicle reporter) got a copy of," Chancellor Alexander Schilt was "a little surprised" Cook had not expressed the sentiments to him directly.

Schilt regretted the "absence of sufficient communication," saying he would have preferred to have taken this budget to the Faculty Senate in June.

"Had we done it in June, we'd have done a better job of communication," Schilt said.

Schilt rationalized the raises by pointing out the UH System's budget savings of 3 percent because of functions provided "in the most efficient way possible."

Schilt was also quick to say the wage increases were not "raises" but "reclassifications," noting new job descriptions and increased duties.

Cook called Schilt's comments "a game... when they want to give somebody a raise and break the historical caps, they call them 'equity adjustments."

Concerned with the university's "responsive reshaping" exercise, Cook asked, "How are you going to cut 10 percent?"

Cook, noting the greater part of the departmental budgets are faculty salaries, said asking the departments to propose budgets with 10 percent cuts "puts people on the cusp."

"President Pickering and Provost Glen D. Aumann should sit down and write a plan before everybody gets mad," Cook suggested.

Also discussed at Wednesday's meeting was the 2 percent of the departmental budget to be withheld based on meeting the university's performance goals: enrollment development, academic performance, scholarly productivity research and expenditure controls -- especially administrative costs.

To a senator's suggestion that one way to increase performance is to lower standards, Cook responded, "I would rather do without the money than to lower the standards and I would hope that each institution would take the same attitude on that."

Saying that most of the performance measures "have nothing to do with quality" and that it is just a matter of "counting," Cook noted, "I don't believe we're going to turn the institution in any particular course in order to chase a few bucks. We're going to do what the institution has decided it's all about ... and the dollars will have to come in accordingly."

Campus Life Committee Chairwoman Agnes De Franco reported a 10 percent reduction in parking fees and that a draft of the new smoking policy was ready for comments.

Reporting for the Educational Policies Committee, Chairman Phillip Goyert mentioned a possible need for "changes in tuition and costs for graduate students in terms of being able to attract grad students to teaching positions."

Cook also suggested Goyert investigate "to what extent a faculty member must accommodate a handicapped student" in order to be in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Reservations about the new mandatory direct deposit authorization forms were raised to Faculty Affairs Committee Chairman Ernst Leiss. President-elect George Reiter urged faculty senators to send Gov. Ann Richards printed postcards asking for the 3 percent raise promised.

Cook also announced the Faculty Senate's fall calendar: Sept. 2 - The University Club Informal Luncheon

Series, Dr. Pickering -- "UH -Directions for the Coming Years"; Sept. 25 - University Club Fall General Meeting: Welcome New Staff and Faculty; Sept. 22 - Dr. Don Streeter -- "This is the Way It Was: Reflections on UH in 1945"; Oct. 14 - Dr. Richard Murray --"The 1992 Political Campaign"; Oct. 28 - Faculty Fall Assembly -- Dr. Pickering: The State of the University Address.

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MAZDA TO BE GIVEN AWAY AT FUND-RAISER

By Tom Anderson

Daily Cougar Staff

A dark green Mazda MX6 will be given away today by Channel 8 KUHT as part of its annual "Act for 8" Tennis Tournament Fund Raiser.

Raffle tickets for the car were sold at $10 each and the winner will be announced today.

As of 10 a.m. Friday, approximately 1,500 raffle tickets had been sold. The deadline for buying tickets was 5 p.m. Friday, said Pat Herbert, Channel 8 outreach coordinator.

The car was donated by Houston Mazda Dealers. Herbert said every year Channel 8 holds a raffle for some kind of Mazda.

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GREEKS ORGANIZE CAR WASH TO RAISE MONEY FOR HURRICANE VICTIMS

Katherine Bui

Daily Cougar Staff

Members of a university service-oriented minority Greek organization came together to help victims of hurricane Andrew.

Pan-Hellenic Council members took to their lawn hoses and sponges Saturday, hosting a car wash at the Burger King on Cullen to raise funds for the Red Cross's Hurricane Andrew Relief Fund.

The suds-wielding Greeks raised more than $87 dollars for the fund, charging around $4 for an exterior wash, vacuuming and interior window wash. Donations were also accepted.

"We might have accepted $5. We might have accepted $3. I think we did some $2 car washes," Pan-Hellenic Council President Ronique Gordon said.

Alpha Phi Alpha member Byron Mickens said, "We could have raised more but we got kind of a late start." Mickens said the wash had been scheduled from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. but didn't get underway until 10:30 a.m.

The nonprofit organization formed in June when the University of Houston's Black Greek Council joined an international organization called the Pan-Hellenic Council.

The Black Greek Council then became a UH chapter of the international council, consisting of eight traditionally black fraternities and sororities - Alpha Kappa Alpha, Delta Sigma Theta, Zeta Phi Beta, Sigma Gamma Rho, Alpha Phi Alpha, Kappa Alpha Psi, Phi Beta Sigma, and Omega Psi Phi.

The local Pan-Hellenic chapter consists of 200 members while the international chapter contains more than 1 million members.

Burger King donated its parking space and water for the effort, and the organization members volunteered their time, soap and lawn hoses.

Gordon said, "We are happy to get the turn out from the organization that we did and happy that everyone turned out to help this worthy cause. The response from the patrons has been outstanding."

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ALUMNI PREPARING TO ALLEVIATE UH'S PENDING BUDGET STRAIN

By Katherine Bui

Daily Cougar Staff

The School of Communications alumni met to discuss plans and preparations for the upcoming year with budget cuts threatening the school's door steps on Aug. 27, at 6 p.m. in the UH Hilton.

The alumni will be playing a crucial role in covering some of the costs the university will cut in their budget.

Last year, the Alumni was able to provide funds for scholarships in the School of Communications and awards for faculty and alumni. This year, the organization will continue to support already established programs as well as providing funds for new equipments.

Kathryn Gehbauer, the newly elected president of the organization, said, "This is an opportune time to approach the alumni for funds to aid with the necessities in the school. Everyone has economic difficulties at this time, but they are able to understand why the school needs funds so much more now."

Gehbauer notes that the budget cuts will reduce the number of faculties hired, because those who are resigning will not be replaced.

A member of the advisory board, Don Lamn, said "I would like to see degrees and advanced classes in advertising be offered, but there is just not enough money in the school right now for graphics and equipments." Another alumnus, Ray Lemmon said, "In order for the programs to survive, the government and the people need to appropriate the funds."

The meeting featured UH President James Pickering.

Pickering stressed the need for a stronger bond between the city and the university.

"The people of this city has realized that they must have an intellectual interstructure. We are Houston's major university, and we must address all the issues to engage the city. If Houston is to survive, then its university must survive."

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"GET HIGH, GET STUPID, GET AIDS," SAYS A NEW AD CAMPAIGN

WASHINGTON (CPS) - AIDS and drugs are the focus of a new government media campaign that hopes to grab the attention of young adults 18-24 by using humor and clever animation.

The "Get High, Get Stupid, Get AIDS" campaign features a couple of cartoon characters the morning after a night of drugs, alcohol and anonymous sex. The message: one wild night can lead to AIDS.

"When you get high, you get stupid," the voiceover warns. "And when you get stupid about sex, you could catch the AIDS virus."

There is a sigh of relief from Jeanine and Barry when they remember they are only cartoon characters.

The new public service announcements are sponsored by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and produced by New York ad agency Della Feminina McNamee Inc. Barry and Jeanine were introduced in mid-August by Health and Human Services Secretary Louis Sullivan.

"We did focus groups and talked about people's sexual habits, drug and alcohol use in that age group," said Michael Chaney, vice president of DFM Inc., which guided the creative aspects of the campaign.

"They are more cynical, very media-savvy, very smart. You can't pull the wool over their eyes. They make fun of advertising, so we were wary of this 'coffin and death' stuff," he said.

Chaney said the focus groups revealed that alcohol is more often the drug of choice than illegal or prescription drugs in that age group.

The announcements point out that drugs and alcohol can lead people to make deadly decisions, but do not mention using condoms or practicing safe sex to ward off AIDS.

"It doesn't sugar-coat the message, and we wanted something they could watch over and over," Chaney said.

The focus groups also determined that young people, having been raised with videos and television, respond best to humor and animation.

"It was thoroughly researched. It's a difficult message and had to be different," said Donna Feiner, director of media administration for the Advertising Council in New York, a non-profit group who coordinated the pro bono ad campaign.

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GET THE MOST OUT OF CLASSES YOU PAID FOR --- PAY ATTENTION!

LEWISBURG, Pa. (CPS) - If you're going to take the time and effort to be in school, you should focus on class while you're there - not the dozens of other concerns that are pressing for attention, a Bucknell University psychotherapist says.

"If you are going to be in class for 50 minutes, be there," said John Ortiz, assistant director of psychological services.

Procrastination and "having to be in the right mood" to study can hinder a student's education, he said.

"You are either in the past or in the future," Ortiz said. "You worked hard to get here (into school), so be here now. Whatever you're doing, do it. The only way to do anything right is with your full attention."

On the other hand, if you see a movie instead of studying, try to get genuine satisfaction from the entertainment, rather than worrying about what you should be doing instead.

Students get into the "shoulds and wants, or just waste time feeling guilty," he said. "By letting go of your expectations you can react to circumstances as they appear, in the here and now."

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AGGIES AIMING FOR NATIONAL RECOGNITION

Jason Luther

Daily Cougar Staff

Last season 11 points came between Texas A&M and a shot at the national championship.

But the fact that only a 35-34 loss at Tulsa and a 10-2 loss to Florida State in the Cotton Bowl kept them from a perfect season earned Texas A&M some national respect.

This season the Aggies once again represent the Southwest Conference's highest hope for national recognition, beginning the 1992 season in the top 10 of every major preseason poll. On paper, it looks like the Aggies will be one of the top contenders for the national title again this year.

As usual, A&M Head Coach R.C. Slocum will look to defense and a strong running game to lead them through a schedule that includes Stanford, LSU, Tulsa and Texas.

The Aggie defense will be led by Junior inside linebacker Jason Atkinson. "The Ax" led the team last season with 95 tackles, including 14 for losses. This was accomplished as a sophomore on the number one defense in the nation that included first round NFL draft pick Quinton Coryatt.

Coryatt will be sorely missed by A&M this season, and the Aggies will look to a pair of sophomores, Reggie Graham and Larry Jackson, to fill the void left by the former All-American.

At outside linebacker, the Aggies look solid as usual with senior Marcus Buckley and sophomore Antonio Shorter.

Buckley, a pre-season, All-America favorite who had 13 sacks and recovered four fumbles last season, is one of the best in the nation at putting pressure on the quarterback. Shorter, who has an explosive blitz, is nevertheless inexperienced and will have a lot to prove this year.

At defensive end A&M will return starters Sam Adams and Lance Teichelman, both of which are big play makers. The 6 foot 4 inch, 282 pound Adams was named as the SWC's top freshman last season and has been compared to former A&M All-American Ray Childress. Teichelman had six tackles behind the line of scrimmage as a sophomore last season.

The Aggies also have several standouts that contribute to a solid defensive backfield.

Look for senior cornerback Derrick Frazier to finally emerge from the shadow cast by former A&M All-American Kevin Smith, who was also taken in the first round of this year's NFL draft. Frazier tied a school record with 13 pass breakups last year and needs only five breakups this season to surpass Smith's career record of 32.

Barring injuries, the Aggies should maintain the reputation that earned them title of "The Wrecking Crew." Having already proved themselves in allowing only one touchdown in the Aggies' 10-7, opening day victory over Stanford, the Aggie defense will need more offensive support to get the kind of convincing wins it will take to move them from seventh to first in the CNN/USA Today Coach's Poll.

Much of that weight should fall on the back of sophomore running back Greg Hill.

Last season Hill gained more yards rushing than any other SWC running back ever (Earl Campbell and Eric Dickerson included).

However, Hill will look to bounce back from a sub-par performance against Stanford in which he gained less than one-fourth of the 121.6 yards per game he averaged last year.

Senior fullback Doug Carter and sophomore running back Rodney Thomas should also contribute in the A&M offensive backfield.

Judging by the Stanford game, Slocum has to be most concerned with the level of play of his quarterbacks and receiving corps.

Throughout most of the first three quarters, either sophomore quarterback Jeff Granger was bouncing passes to his receivers or balls were bouncing off of their chests.

Granger has the unenviable task of filling former Aggie standout Bucky Richardson's shoes.

There is no doubting Granger's athletic ability, but he is not as mobile as Richardson. He'll need more support from an offensive line led by senior right guard and All-America candidate John Ellisor and junior center Chris Dausin.

The Aggies will also look for support from sophomore placekicker Terry Venetoulias. Venetoulias was one of the most consistent kickers in the conference last season, connecting on 13-18 field goals and 49-of-50 extra points. He was eight of 10 inside the 30-yard line.

In fact, if A&M would have kicked each time they were in field goal range last year against Florida State, they likely would have won the Cotton Bowl.

Venetoulias scored four of the Aggies' 10 points against Stanford, and with the Aggies' recent trend of low-scoring affairs, could play a big role in the Aggies' run for a second straight conference title.

If the defense does remain healthy and Granger and the A&M passing game can improve enough to establish the running game, the Aggies have to be the odds on favorite to repeat as SWC champions and make the trip to Dallas.

More than that, they have a shot to earn more well-deserved national respect for themselves and just a little sorely-needed respect for the sagging SWC.

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1992 SWC FOOTBALL PREVIEW (part one)

COUGARS LOKING FOR DEFENSIVE SUPPORT

By Keith Rollins

Daily Cougar Staff

After last years respectable 7-4 season, the Horned Frogs of Texas Christian are looking to make another forward leap behind rookie head coach Pat Sullivan.

With oft-injured quarterback Leon Clay back at the helm and 16 starters returning, that possibility will be easily attainable.

The Frogs' schedule, besides the regular conference games, makes that notion seem even easier.

Their only real test will be against last year's co-national champion powerhouse Miami Hurricanes.

The offense, as long as Clay stays healthy, appears especially lethal.

The receiving corps include proven hands like Stephen Shipley, Richard Woodley, Kyle McPherson and highly-thought-of tightend Mike Noack. Noack will fill the vacant place left by All-American Kelly Blackwell.

Running back veterans Curtis Modkins and Derrick Cullors are also back for another campaign. Those two backs combined for 1,001 rushing yards, another 400 yards in receiving, in 1991.

The offensive line, like so many other teams, is suspect as is the kicking game.

On the other side of the ball, the defense will need improvement. After losing last year's all-league defensive-end Roosevelt Collins, his counter-part, Tunji Bolden, will be the main anchor on the defense. Besides him, it looks bleak.

The linebacking corps are in the same position. Looking past senior Brad Smith in the middle and up-and-coming sophomore Mike Moulton on the strong side, much of the responsibility falls on the shoulders of incoming freshmen. Not a good sign for Sullivan.

A good sign, however, is the Frogs' secondary, which may be the most stable part of the whole team. Veterans Tony Rand, Greg Evans, Anthony Hickman and Rico Wesley pride themselves as collision specialists.

Overall, Sullivan, after viewing his troops so far, believes it is imperative to become bigger and stronger up front, on both sides of the ball. His suggestions to his players: increase consistency, add strength and crank up intensity.

As long as Clay stays healthy and the defense makes spectacular strides before facing a team with some promise, which isn't until their game against Oklahoma State, TCU has some promise.

By the way, Sullivan's first order of business after arriving in Frogland was to switch from artificial turf use in the stadium, back to real grass, the first school in the league to do so. I guess Sullivan thinks frogs can jump further on natural surfaces.

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A & M POSSESS RIGHT TOOLS FOR CHAMPIONSHIP RUN

By Jason Luther

Daily Cougar

Texas A&M has begun its campaign for a second straight conference title and a possible national championship with a 10-7 win over Stanford in the Disneyland Pigskin Classic Wednesday night at Anaheim Stadium in Anaheim, California.

Aggie placekicker Terry Venetoulias made a 39-yard field goal late in the second half to push A&M ahead of the Bill Walsh-led Cardinals in college football's first game of the season.

In a game that saw the two teams combine for 22 punts, the contest was a hard-fought defensive battle, as both teams showed much on defense and very little on offense.

The Aggies seemed almost stagnant in the first half as they were shut out 7-0.

Sophomore quarterback Jeff Granger looked tight, missing on most of his first half attempts.

However, after being pulled in the third quarter for two possessions, Granger came back to lead the team to two decisive scoring drives.

Granger finished the day 11-31 for 132 yards, a touchdown and no interceptions.

Granger's job looks safe for the time being, however, as back-up freshmen Corey Pullig and Matt Miller combined for -17 net yards.

But the Aggie defense won the game, allowing only one score -- but even that came after Aggie special teams allowed a long punt return that put the Cardinals deep in their own territory.

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POWER COMPANY SUPPLIES GULAG OF GRUNGE

By Manuel Esparza

Daily Cougar Staff

For a moment, imagine lilting lyrics and moving melodies. Okay, dump that image because the Terminal Power Company is not like that at all.

What they are is an English duo who created, in their own words, "hard-edged psychogenic dance-influenced film music."

From the first note to the last dub, this industrial dance outfit provides the hip-grinding grunge that's heard in inner-loop dance clubs.

What makes them stand out from the herd is their relentless pursuit of the most basic of beats, minus the monotony.

Generating an atmosphere of the forbidden on Run Silent, Run Deep, Paul Aspel and Jon Roome keep pushing the listener down a concentina wire, deeper into a gulag of grunge.

The first track, "The Hunger, The Heat," shows samples of the musical tricks they pull off in the rest of the album.

Short on lyrical content, the material is easily absorbed and can be sung along with before the first verse is over. Actually, scanning through the rest of the lyric sheet (generously supplied) it appears to be written more for the unsaid rather than for what is stated.

The second and third tracks, "Deeper" and "Salvation" are more billowing bass and guitar noise. The sneering challenge in "Slow Motion Riot" and of "...you know the time, you know the place..." defies authorities to clean up urban waste.

Ending the disc is "Urban Psycho," a more subdued piece that makes one look behind the curtains just to be sure.

This is just great stuff. For those who just can't get enough of loud dance music, Run Silent, Run Deep will keep those happy feet going.

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LEMONS GOOD TO THE LAST DROP

By Manuel Esparza

Daily Cougar Staff

Once upon a time, there were two British music rags, one aimed at pop and the other aimed at alternative music. One day a new band sent them each a copy of its first album.

The pop rag said it had delightful melodies. The alternative rag said its guitars were reminiscent of the 1977 sound. Readers, stunned that both rags gave it "album of the week," immediately rushed out to buy the new vinyl.

Seven years later, the Mighty Lemon Drops are still tantalizing both the voguesters and the vaguesters.

Their new album, "Richochet," is busy bouncing up the British charts. Spawning songs such as "Into the Sun," "Blues Inside," "Hallowed Ground" and "More" this album should be played with the repeat button pushed.

The first single is "Into the Sun." Melting melodies and a mesmerizing guitar riff make this the one to listen for on the lower FM dial.

"From the Sky" sounds bright and has a high probability of becoming a concert mainstay. The last three tracks are like a blonde with a bad peroxide job; it shows their roots. Originally a punk outfit, the Drops have mellowed their sound in subsequent albums. The final cuts show that they still have the power to reproduce the old Maxell commercials.

What is impressive about the music is that this is what you get in a live Lemon Drops' concert; very few overdubs and no sequencing. This should appeal to the purists out there. Basically, what you hear is what you'll get at their show.

The material was written, rehearsed and recorded continually from August 1991 through mid-March 1992, with the recording taking place in 33 days.

The album leaves the listener feeling good all over. Break open your piggybank, spend your last bit of grant money or tell everyone it's your birthday. They're due to arrive in town soon and you'll want to sing along.

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SINGER VYING FOR STEVE VAI'S ATTENTION

By Rebecca McPhail

Daily Cougar

Seated next to guitar wizard Steve Vai in the first class section of a Continental airliner, armed only with a demo tape of his own vocals, singer and aspiring Steve Vai band-member Jay Hollander, had only one thought: "What if Steve doesn't like my dog?"

Hollander spent two years and thousands of dollars attempting to meet Vai only to risk thwarting his chances with a puppy, named Pepper, hastily smuggled on the plane.

"She's just a puppy and I couldn't find a babysitter for her," Hollander said.

Fortunately everything worked out for the best. Not only did Vai love Pepper, but Hollander scored an audition with one of the most prominent guitarists in the rock field.

Hardly a novice in the music industry, 30-year-old Hollander has been singing since age five.

"It was something I was naturally good at," he said. "When I was young I sounded like Donny Osmond and Michael Jackson."

Since then, Hollander has spent a good deal of time honing his talent in the Houston club scene.

"I've been in 13 bands and I've sung at nearly every club in Houston at one time or another," he said.

His dedication started paying off in 1988 when he took first prize in "Houston's Most Talented Vocalist" competition sponsored by the now-defunct Hippo's club.

Hollander received $1,200.00 and five free hours of studio time, not to mention added recognition for his abilities.

Not long after, Hollander caught a David Lee Roth show which featured Vai on guitar. He was more than a little impressed.

"I thought, 'God, I'd love to be in a band with that guy,'" he said.

Yet, after two years of calling record companies, sending tapes and making countless trips to Los Angeles, Hollander was still no closer to his goal of reaching the reclusive guitarist.

However, Hollander's luck was about to change.

Three weeks ago, a friend casually mentioned Vai's impending appearance at KLOL's rock n' roll auction set to take place at the Summit.

Hollander saw his chance.

"I went to KLOL and talked to Stevens and Pruitt. I asked if they could introduce me to Vai but they said they couldn't help," he said.

Still determined, Hollander turned his attention to the airlines. Through a series of calls (and the help of some friends) he was able to find Vai's flight number and book himself in the seat next to Vai.

Once face to face with Vai, Hollander did his best to remain calm.

"Here I was sitting next to Steve Vai... but I just tried to act like nothing was going on," he said.

Eventually Vai began talking and the topic steered to his inability to find a lead singer for his newly-formed band.

It was at this point Hollander recounted his two year odyssey to reach Vai for the sole purpose of auditioning for him.

The guitarist was duly impressed.

"He was just blown away," Hollander said. "He couldn't believe what I had done."

Hollander will most likely be auditioning for Vai in October.

"I'm excited," Hollander said. "I feel real lucky about this. After all, I've been scoping him out for two years."

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LOLLAPALOOZA OFFERS MORE THAN MUSIC

By Shane Patrick Boyle

Daily Cougar Staff

Those attending Lollapalooza this Saturday will hear live music from big name bands like Red Hot Chili Peppers, Ministry, Pearl Jam, Soundgarden and others. But music is not all this twelve hour festival will offer, because Lollapalooza is not just a concert; it's a carnival -- complete with a midway.

Like any carnival, Lollapalooza will have games, but these are not typical games. There will be a "Safe Sex Wheel of Fortune" and a strength test called "Wake Up Mr. President, What about the Homeless." These games will raise money for local AIDS research and the Coalition for the Homeless.

The carnival atmosphere will be further advanced by the performers from the Jim Rose Circus Sideshow (complete with sword swallower) and the costumed characters of Archie Bell's Future Kulture who will be walking around the midway as well as performing on the second stage while mainstage acts set up.

The midway will also feature an unparalleled encounter with art and information.

Art will be "everywhere" according to promoters, and there will even be interactive art such as the "Rhythm Beast" -- the ultimate instrument which thirty people can play at once.

Among the most talked about of the attractions on the midway are the booths selling smart drinks -- natural beverages containing vitamins and amino acids, that serve as alternatives to coffee, drugs and alcohol.

The drinks are part of the line offered by Smart Products Inc. which offers a catalogue and monthly newsletter. The company offers a variety of products to aid with memory, increase alertness or act as a substitute for caffeine. "Orbit Juice" and "Quantum Punch", for example, contain C-phenoylamine acid which increases mental clarity.

The smart drinks have been a big attraction at Lollapalooza as it has toured the country, according to Smart Product's Vice President Jim English, workers are "serving them until their arms fall off." Even band members are using the products to produce "better work without hangovers."

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ENTERTAIN ME

a weekly events calander

Wednesday 9/2

"Cougar Kick-off 92"

4 p.m.-midnight at Lynn Eusan Park

--Back-to-school party to benefit the Stone Soup Pantry and Operation School Supply. Highlights include a performance by Trish and Darin and a Cougar football pep rally. UH President James Pickering and Head Coach John Jenkins will be on hand to address those attending. Soft drinks will be free, and beer will be 50 cents. Board cards will be accepted for food. Admission is a donation of either canned goods or school supplies.

Thursday 9/3

*College of Business Back-to-School Bash

--5:30-8:30 p.m. behind Melcher Hall

--Open to all students. Donations of school supplies for needy children will be accepted. Donation will automatically enter student in a raffle for a $200 gift certificate from the UH bookstore.

*Interfraternity Council Rush Information Session

--4 p.m. at The Cougar Den

--Those interested should plan to attend.

Friday 9/4

--Student Organization Registration

--2 p.m. at Campus Activities Large Conference Room

--All students interested in starting a new organization on campus should make plans to attend. The session will last one hour and 15 minutes.

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LESS THAN THRILLED WITH THE THRILL KILL KULT

By Gram Gemoets

Daily Cougar Staff

My Life With the Thrill Kill Kult has launched yet another assault upon pop culture. This time the band's album is called Sexplosion and it holds nothing sacred - not "family values" or censorship or even taste. What we are talking about here is cheap computerized sensationalism.

It must be said, however, that some narrow-minded pseudo-intellectual x-popping hip-hoppers actually like this kind of flash-trash. In their case, they deserve to have their minimum wage paychecks diminished by purchasing this album.

The music itself seeks to capitalize on our infatuation with sex. Even the album cover boasts a crude nude male. This rubbish may work for the likes of Madonna (ever bordering on the pornographic side) but not for the Thrill Kills. Their music, lyrics and graphic designs are sheer porno.

Even my crazy brother, who listens to Brittant Fox and AC/DC said, "It's techno-pop and it's awful."

The Thrill Kills started out some decade ago with some weird lyrics and a dream. After securing some local club gigs on the L.A. scene, the band secured a management/recording contract from Interscope Records in the late 1980's.

The group, influenced by Cabaret Voltaire and the as-yet-unknown, Lady Miss Keir of Dee-Lite fame, cut a demo called Glam Sound and sent it to radio stations around the country. Glam Sound eventually achieved minor successes but soon faded into total obscurity. However, Interscope now had faith in their new asset and the band members have established some credit.

Several feature albums followed, culminating with two cross-country tours which brought the band to locations such as Chicago, New York and even Houston (lucky us).

Their first release in over a year is called Sexplosion. However, the American public at large could have survived another decade or so without this new material.

It has become common place for the "California" recording industry to build hype around band members who play no instruments to speak of. (Never fear, New York is just as guilty of doing the same thing.) Simply Red and Michael Jackson are prime examples of this strange phenomena. Still it must be noted that these artists can sing. The Thrill Kills cannot afford either luxury: they cannot sing and they cannot play instruments.

Oh sure, they have a keyboard player. He sounds like Depeche Mode playing R.E.M., if you can imagine that. The rest of the Thrill Kills unique sound comes from an assortment of machines and computers...what talent.

Sexplosion begins as a wet dream and quickly becomes a nightmare. "The International Sin Set" starts off the album and quickly sets the pace for all future tracks.

The sound is very club-oriented and will surely end up being played in several of them. There is little variation from the straight, high-driven beat. In short, it sounds as if someone had re-mixed the noise of a jackhammer and tried to sing along.

"Dream Baby", the fourth cut, is really the best cut out of the collection. It is slightly dreamlike with such poetic lyrics as "dream on, come on, dream on, come on, dream on, come on..." you get the idea. A fifth grader could lip-synch this garbage. However, this song has a more melodic undertone than any other song on Sexplosion.

The most insulting song award goes to "Sex on Wheelz". With obvious reference to the semi-nudes gracing the album's cover, lead vocalist Groovie Mann asks for a "human sacrifice."

For those not familiar with the Thrill Kills, this is the song getting all the radio airplay on Power 104. In fact, a few weeks ago, this number had a minor place on the Billboard Hot Chart.

Well, enough of a music review, it is making me sick. After all, we live in a free country and you can make up your mind for yourself.

You can even catch the Thrill Kills as they take another tour this fall. The band will make several stops through Chicago, Missouri, Louisiana and Texas with a Houston date on Sept. 14 at Numbers. The industrial atmosphere of that particular club is probably best for these guys.

There is some justice after all of this. Because of the Thrill Kill's cheap take-off sound, it will never become a classic and will soon be forgotten by the general public. Yes, this means you. Even this reviewer is spared from hearing this music on the radio for very long, for it won't make it very far in the world of commercial airplay.

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TWIN PEAKS RISES FROM THE GRAVE; LAURA PALMER IS BETTER OFF DEAD

By Sally Pouncy

Daily Cougar Staff

Laura Palmer should never have risen from the grave.

Sorry Twin Peaks fans, but the events in your favorite northwestern town should have gone peacefully into syndication, not onto the large screen.

David Lynch's latest pat on his own shoulder Twin Peaks -Fire Walk with Me , comes to this country during a recession and anyone who goes to see this film comes out teetering on the edge of depression.

By the time Laura Palmer actually dies you're relieved, because while you're watching the movie you hope somebody kills this girl and gets her out of her misery.

Laura Palmer may have been the most talked about dead person on television, but her last few days were pretty much a living hell. Her boyfriend tells her he loves her, and normally this would not be a bad thing, but leave it to Lynch to wring a young girls heart into nothing more than an over-used dish rag.

Her best friend finds out her homecoming queen duties are extending to more than spirit-raising for a local bar owner. Her nightmares start coming true, and her wall pictures begin to reflect her image with Kodak clarity.

David Lynch pokes his fuller face onto the screen with a cameo as a technically deaf F.B.I. agent with an annoying hearing aid and a penchant for Sesame Street-like codes.

Julia Roberts' almost-hubby, Kiefer Sutherland, has a small role as a "towhead" of a F.B.I. agent.

"Wicked Game" singer Chris Isaak landed a role as another inept F.B.I. agent, but no singing for this crooner. David Bowie walks in and fades out of Kyle MacLachlan's Special agent Cooper's vision "Damn good cup of coffee." All the while practically every other person who ever worked in a Lynch production makes an appearance.

Everybody already knows the ending, so why go see a movie that deals with an ex-T.V. series story line?

In short, if you don't want to contribute to the recession, stay away from Twin Peaks Fire Walk with Me. Go help with the relief efforts in Louisiana, or read your text books, or meet your neighbors, or experience life (walk across campus at midnight,) or best of all, spend your money on a good film!

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FIGHT FOR WHITE HOUSE COMING TO GET VOTES FROM COLLEGE CAMPUSES

By John Williams and Karen Neustadt

CPS -- The fight for the presidency has moved from the convention halls to the towns, cities and campuses across the United States, particularly key states in the Midwest. And the 1992 campaign is shaping up as a bruising battle on issues of the economy, trust and family values.

President Bush and Vice President Dan Quayle received the official go-ahead from the party faithful at the Aug. 17-20 Republican convention in Houston.

Bush and Quayle want four more years to push their agenda of less government and lower taxes.

Democratic presidential candidate Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton and his running mate, U.S. Sen. Al Gore of Tennessee, maintain that after 12 years of Republican presidential leadership, a change of party and philosophy is needed at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave.

The race for the White House includes winning the hearts - and votes - of college and university students. While historically the 18-24 age group has had the lowest voter turnout of all age groups, both parties have made it clear the youth vote is important.

And that fight is being held on college campuses across the United States. College Republicans were out in force at the Republican convention in Houston, as was the Republican Youth Coalition, controlled by College Republicans.

About 500 College Republicans helped run the show at the convention, said Mandy Innis, national first vice-chairman of the College Republicans. She said many of them got on the convention floor each night and were active in helping out with logistics.

Innis, who graduated this year from the University of Texas-Austin with a degree in international business, said two main issues that face students are the economy and jobs. Like many other Republicans, she blamed Congress, not Bush, for the stagnant economy and other social problems.

She doesn't have a job yet, but is hopeful she will find one. And what impresses her most is that "I feel strongly that the world is free now, and policies both President Bush and (former president) Reagan helped with that," she said. "The president is committed to a safe world."

While such phrases as "family values" and "lower taxes" were bandied about the Astrodome in Houston, neither Bush nor Quayle made direct mention of any higher education issue during their keynote speeches. However, prior to the convention Bush had said he intended to make education one of his highest priorities.

During his acceptance speech in Houston, Bush said: "Improve our schools so our kids can get the education they need to succeed. Let's help these kids."

Tony Zagotta, chairman of the College Republican National Committee, said it is the Democratically controlled Congress, not President Bush, that's responsible for the current economic woes.

While the job market has not improved for college students, "I don't put the blame on Bush, but on the Congress. Young people feel that way. The president's polling numbers for this age group are the best he has. Young people appreciated the Republicans' approach to free trade," he said. "Of course there are problems, but there is a lot of opportunity out there."

What concerns college students, Republican student leaders say, are the economy, jobs and foreign policy.

"Republicans aren't addressing the concerns of young people," said Jamie Harmon, president of the College Democrats. "Republicans don't have a message that speaks for the young people. Democrats have a plank for change. Young people know George Bush has failed."

A major issue that divides the Democratic and Republican planks is abortion. The Democratic platform supports the right of women to choose, while the Republican platform supports a constitutional amendment banning abortion.

Another area is the economy. Democrats blame Bush for not using his office or his personal popularity to do anything constructive for the economy, aside from supporting tax cuts for the wealthy. Bush blames the Democratic majority in Congress for blocking various proposals that he believes would get the economy moving again.

"I think that the Republicans have been giving young people the one-two punch," Harmon said. "We have the largest student loan debt in history and the worst job market in 20 years."

The campaign promises to be a rough one, with both sides attacking and counterattacking on the economy, family values, social issues and even spouses. And the jabbing, some analysts said, could turn off college students to the election process.

"It's going to be ugly. I wonder how it's going to affect young people," said Evan McKenzie, a professor of political science at Albright College in Reading, Pa. "I don't think young people like this."

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COLLEGE STUDENTS NOT EXEMPT FORM AIDS; CASES AMONG THE YOUNG RISING STEADILY

By Jenny Silverman

Contributing Writer

If anyone thinks he or she is safe from the threat of HIV infection because of their relative youth, they are wrong. And the longer they wait to realize this, the better the chances they won't survive the revelation.

A recent study by the Centers for Disease Control said the number of AIDS cases in people from age 13 to 24 almost doubled in the last two-and-a-half years.

The study showed that since the recognition of the epidemic in 1981, the number of AIDS cases in people age 13 to 24 reached 9,783 as of April 1992. This is up from 5,524 through 1989.

Roger Widmeyer, head of public affairs for the Thomas Street Clinic, said that since April 1992, patients visited his clinic 24,320 times.

Roger said that by 1995, the number of visits per year will rise to 125,000, averaging about eight visits per patient.

Right now, the clinic serves 3,040 patients.

"We are looking at 16,000 (patients) in one clinic by '95. Of these numbers, 40 percent are heterosexual females," Widmeyer said.

A 1989 study sponsored by the American College Health Association shows that 0.2 percent of U.S. university students who had their blood tested carry the human immunodeficiency virus that causes AIDS.

Betty Reed, a UH Health Center medical technician, stated that she sees an increase of, "possibly 1 percent per year in the white male college community."

Although Reed did not have figures breaking statistics down by sexual orientation or for female students, she said this does not mean there is no cause for alarm among the groups not documented.

Widmeyer said of the estimated 3,000 Houston AIDS patients his clinic serves, 38 were individuals age 15 to 19. Among college students in Houston age 20 to 29, the number of clinic patients rose to 879, or 29 percent.

According to the Center for Disease Control, 6 percent of the cases of AIDS among adults resulted from heterosexual contact. The percentage increases to 12 for the number of AIDS cases resulting from heterosexual contact among young people.

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CAMERA-TOTING PROFESSORS FOLLOWING POLITICAL CONVENTIONS

CPS - Two video-toting professors from Ball State University are becoming media veterans as they patrol the political conventions in search of footage soon to be seen in thousands of college classrooms.

Ralph Baker and Joe Losco, a pair of political scientists who started out three years ago "just to have a little fun," have found themselves producers of two videos that will accompany two best-selling political science textbooks.

"We started off with a fairly crude video at first," Losco said. "We were pleased when a publisher asked us to do a whole series for them." The first video was about a day in the life of a local congressman.

One of the two videos now in production will focus on the 1992 campaign; the other on the role of party politics in the race for the White House.

The pair, who have no previous film experience, say they often hire camera crews and directors to work for them. At the Democratic convention, they shared production facilities with MTV and other alternative media.

"We noticed a lot of unorthodox media coverage at the convention. There was a much more diverse media corps, not the standard Washington-New York elite type, but rather representatives of lots of groups including young people," Losco said.

"We were the editors," explained Losco, who said he and his partner often worked until midnight interviewing delegates and politicians at Madison Square Garden and the Republican convention at Houston's Astrodome.

"Ralph and I make sure the product is driven by the content, and not the medium," said Losco, who noted the publishers hired them because they were political scientists who were familiar with the issues that need to be conveyed to college students.

Losco predicted that the textbook will be only one component in a multimedia mix in the classroom of the future. "You'll see videos, class simulations, computer software and textbooks integrated and made to work together as a unit."

Today's college students, added Losco, are part of a "visual generation."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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