DEMOCRATS VOW TO RE-TAKE AMERICA WITH PRESIDENT ELECT CLINTON

by Jeff Balke

Daily Cougar Staff

"No more Bush," was the chant heard in the Main Ballroom of the Sheraton Astrodome when Democratic presidential nominee, Gov. Bill Clinton of Arkansas, earned enough electoral votes to win the forty-second presidency of the United States.

Andrew Monzon, president of the College Democrats, said, "Democrats are happy tonight."

Independent candidate, Ross Perot, told his supporters in Dallas, "The American people have chosen their new president and that man is Governor Clinton. Now it is time for us all to work together."

Rep. Craig Washington, D-Texas, said, "This is our country and, tonight, we decided to take it back."

A high voter turnout may have contributed to the overwhelming victory for Clinton. Issues including the economy and health care brought out voters like UH graduate, Tony Settles, who has been out of work for nineteen months. "I am sick of Bush. I am sick of Reagan. I am sick of the religious right (wing of the Republican Party). I could take them all, dump them in the Potomac (River) and never let them surface," he said.

Some Republicans supported Clinton this election. One of those is Wayne Collins, a senior political science major at UH. He said he is sick of Bush and trickle-down economics. Environmental issues also helped sway his vote in Clinton's direction.

He said he also agreed with Clinton's economic plan to rebuild the infrastructure of America. "Bush is embracing ideas that just aren't working. If the Democratic Patry continues to think and not be blatantly liberal, I will continue to support them," he said.

Clinton tried to bring Americans, Republicans and Democrats together in his acceptance speech. Speaking to a crowd of over 75,000 in Little Rock, Ark., Clinton said, "We're all in this together. We will rise and fall together."

Clinton's running mate, Sen. Al Gore from Tennessee, told the cheering crowd in Arkansas that this election has not just been a change of leaders, but a change of generations. Conceding that he and Clinton, both in their mid-forties, are a young ticket, Gore said, "We will bring new energy to the government."

Clinton and Gore have a tough road ahead of them. With an uncertain economy and an unstable world order, the president's job will be more difficult than ever. The message from Democrats and Republicans alike is clear. It is essential that all Americans work together in the future to ensure America turns its economy around.

Even Bush offered his help to Clinton in a phone call to the Arkansas governor congratulating him on his victory. Clinton even asked the crowd in Little Rock to offer their thanks to Bush for his lifetime of service and, especially, his service as president.

Monzon said the job of the College Democrats after the election is to continue to keep people involved. "Democracy only works when people stay involved," he said.

Washington agreed with Monzon. "Tomorrow morning, when we go to work, we are going to roll up our sleeves because we are just as serious about solving our problems with him (Clinton) as we were with Bush," he said.

Washington called for Clinton to work to solve the problems America faces. "While we talk, we have people that sleep under bridges, people with AIDS, low birth-weight babies being born, and we can't find a health care system for our country," he said.

The road ahead for America is uncertain, but the American people have decided that they want a change, not just in leaders, but in ideas. They believe Bill Clinton is the change they need.

 

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CLINTON WINS PRESIDENCY BY A LANDSLIDE

by Channing King

News reporter

Governor Bill Clinton seized the White House Tuesday night, ending 12 years of Republican control of the Oval Office.

Clinton needed 270 electoral college votes to win and collected 286 electoral votes before many states, including Texas (32 electoral votes) and California (54 electoral votes) were tabulated.

This year's election prompted a 10 percent increase from 1988 in the number of people visiting the polls. Tom Brokaw, anchor of NBC's election coverage, said more than 60 percent had cast their votes nationally.

Except for the 1984 election, the percentage of people voting declined from 62.8 percent in 1960 to 50.2 percent in 1988. In 1984, the percentage rose half a percent to 53.1.

Of 100 UH students randomly interviewed, 73 said they had voted and an additional nine were going to vote. Twelve voters took advantage of Texas' early voting.

Katie Garcia, a sophomore psychology major, said she did not vote because "it just doesn't matter."

Another student, who asked to remain nameless, echoed Garcia's view and said he would not vote because "I just don't like any of the candidates."

Doug Olson, a senior majoring in philosophy and political science, said he would have voted but he was registered in another state. He did not send in an absentee ballot.

UH Political Science Professor Dr. Richard Murray, serving as an analyst for KPRC Channel 2, said Harris County is more conservative than the state of Texas as a whole.

With 85 percent of voting precincts reporting at press time, 1,059,583 people had cast ballots. Bush won 41 percent of the Harris County vote. Clinton trailed with 40 percent. Independent candidate H. Ross Perot was a distant third with 18 percent.

"I thought it would be close in the state, in the city and in the county," Murray said.

After forecasters see-sawed for several hours, Bush was finally awarded Texas. Clinton handily won California.

With several states uncounted, Clinton could exceed Bush's 1988 margin of victory in the Electoral College. Bush defeated Michael Dukakis by 315 electoral votes.

Presidential elections since 1960 have been decided by an average of 306 electoral votes. Ronald Reagan defeated Walter Mondale in 1984 by 512 electoral votes, the largest margin in the past 32 years.The closest election since 1960 was Carter's 1976 victory over Ford by 57 electoral votes.

 

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REPUBLICANS SOMBER: BUNS CONCEDES DEMOCRATIC VICTORY

by Karen Snelling

Daily Cougar Staff

President Bush ended his concession speech Tuesday night with a message urging young people to participate in politics.

American government needs the idealism and drive of the youth, the president said.

The president seemed to have high spirits as he delivered his concession speech to a crowd who greeted him by cheering, "Thank you, George!"

The president congratulated Bill Clinton and asked Americans to support the new president-elect. "America must always come first, so we will get behind this new president," Bush said.

Bush said he plans to continue serving the country and to get active in the grandchild business.

The colorful streamers and lively music at the Westin Galleria Hotel where Bush spoke didn't fit the Republican supporters' tears and somber faces.

"It's not going to be much of a party tonight," said Brian Berry, Republican campaign director for Texas. Berry said Bush lost several states many Republicans expected him to win, Louisiana, Kentucky and Georgia, among others.

David Vaughn, president of Houston Young Professional Republicans, said the Bush campaign was weak because few people volunteered. Vaughn said his club, which originally planned to have 40 volunteers working on the campaign, only had 15 people spend time on the campaign effort. "Bush is just not Reagan," he said.

Bush lost because people wanted a change in government whether for good or bad, said Jim Kruckemyer, advance-man for the Republican campaign.

"We're in a year when the fashion has changed," said Justin Dart, chairman of the Republican Campaign for the Disabled. Dart said people want a different type of president.

Dart said his campaign group supported Bush because in 1990 Bush signed the Americans for Disability Act (ADA), which was the first civil rights law for the disabled. In 1952, Dart began the UH Association for Racial Standing, the first integration group at UH.

Craig Clover, precinct chairman of the Harris County Executive Board, said the abortion issue divided the Republican Party.

"The country is going to Hell in a hand basket," said Mike Lombard, campaign volunteer. Lombard said no one during the campaign mentioned how much money Bush spent for AIDs research.

Campaign volunteer, Michael Wallace, said the election was not fair. "The President doesn't have total control of the economy," he said.

"The people just want to be wooed," said Robert Didion, campaign volunteer. Bill Clinton has quite a few surprises waiting for him when he gets to the White House, Didion said.

Didion said the Republicans will win even though Clinton won. "We'll just be here in four years to pick up the pieces," he said.

Campaign volunteer, Sandra Blake, said even though Bush lost, she was glad she stayed "true blue" all four years.

Republican supporters, who stood for three hours waiting for the president to speak and appeared optimistic until the end, comforted each other with hugs as the band ended the night with Lee Greenwood's "Proud to be an American".

 

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PEROT TELLS SUPPORTERS: LOOK TO POST-ELECTION TASKS

by Ericka Schiche

Daily Cougar Staff

Despite the fact he didn't garner any electoral college votes at the time of his speech, H. Ross Perot refused to concede yesterday at the Grand Kempinski Hotel in Dallas.

Instead, the former Naval Academy midshipman -- who has likened the United States to a weak frigate -- challenged supporters to look past the election to a time of transition with President-Elect Bill Clinton.

Perot realized, as did many of his supporters, he would not be the one chosen to serve as captain of the ship. At press time, he had received 16 percent of the popular vote, a number close to what had been projected in various pre-election day polls.

"Our founders built a beautiful ship of state, but the barnacles have latched on and the hull has rusted. It's time for a scrubdown from top to bottom," he wrote in <i>United We Stand<p>, a book that amounted to his political platform.

He asked supporters to do something they obviously did not want to do -- applaud Clinton.

"Forget the election. It's behind us. The hard work is in front of us -- we must all work together to rebuild our great country," he said, with no sign of disappointment in his voice.

Even those who did not vote for Perot will probably find it hard to forget the independent candidate who entered the race unofficially via talk show appearances and petition drives, stepped away from the campaign trail, and re-entered despite the odds.

Perot advocated the dismantling of the Electoral College, proposed a 10 cent gasoline tax to be levied over a five-year period and wanted to eliminate the regal aspect of the presidency.

During the campaign season, he said "Hail to the Chief" would not be played if he entered a room as president. He also said he would not accept the $200,000 per year salary.

Perot will undoubtedly go down in history as one of few independent candidates to actually cause a mass grassroots movement away from the major political parties.

He has often been caricatured. Many, especially journalists and leaders such as Democratic National Committee Chairman Ron Brown, had dismissed him as a candidate.

The United We Stand ticket, which also included Vice Presidential candidate Admiral James Stockdale, had been given little chance to succeed.

In the San Jacinto room of the Astrodome Sheraton Hotel, Perot's Houston volunteers seemed slightly disappointed about their candidate's loss. They spent part of the night bidding for red, white and blue hats. The somber mood of the Bush camp, which seemed to hang about the air in the Westin Galleria Hotel like a fine mist, was contrasted by the more celebratory mood of the Perot camp.

While thanking his campaign workers, Perot said they helped create the pearl formed after he -- the grain of sand -- irritated the oyster.

The billionaire businessman will most likely return to the private sector and continue speaking on behalf of those declared Missing In Action or Prisoner of War.

 

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PEROT TELLS SUPPORTERS: LOOK TO POST-ELECTION TASKS

by Ericka Schiche

Daily Cougar Staff

Despite the fact he didn't garner any electoral college votes at the time of his speech, H. Ross Perot refused to concede yesterday at the Grand Kempinski Hotel in Dallas.

Instead, the former Naval Academy midshipman -- who has likened the United States to a weak frigate -- challenged supporters to look past the election to a time of transition with President-Elect Bill Clinton.

Perot realized, as did many of his supporters, he would not be the one chosen to serve as captain of the ship. At press time, he had received 16 percent of the popular vote, a number close to what had been projected in various pre-election day polls.

"Our founders built a beautiful ship of state, but the barnacles have latched on and the hull has rusted. It's time for a scrubdown from top to bottom," he wrote in <i>United We Stand<p>, a book that amounted to his political platform.

He asked supporters to do something they obviously did not want to do -- applaud Clinton.

"Forget the election. It's behind us. The hard work is in front of us -- we must all work together to rebuild our great country," he said, with no sign of disappointment in his voice.

Even those who did not vote for Perot will probably find it hard to forget the independent candidate who entered the race unofficially via talk show appearances and petition drives, stepped away from the campaign trail, and re-entered despite the odds.

Perot advocated the dismantling of the Electoral College, proposed a 10 cent gasoline tax to be levied over a five-year period and wanted to eliminate the regal aspect of the presidency.

During the campaign season, he said "Hail to the Chief" would not be played if he entered a room as president. He also said he would not accept the $200,000 per year salary.

Perot will undoubtedly go down in history as one of few independent candidates to actually cause a mass grassroots movement away from the major political parties.

He has often been caricatured. Many, especially journalists and leaders such as Democratic National Committee Chairman Ron Brown, had dismissed him as a candidate.

The United We Stand ticket, which also included Vice Presidential candidate Admiral James Stockdale, had been given little chance to succeed.

In the San Jacinto room of the Astrodome Sheraton Hotel, Perot's Houston volunteers seemed slightly disappointed about their candidate's loss. They spent part of the night bidding for red, white and blue hats. The somber mood of the Bush camp, which seemed to hang about the air in the Westin Galleria Hotel like a fine mist, was contrasted by the more celebratory mood of the Perot camp.

While thanking his campaign workers, Perot said they helped create the pearl formed after he -- the grain of sand -- irritated the oyster.

The billionaire businessman will most likely return to the private sector and continue speaking on behalf of those declared Missing In Action or Prisoner of War.

 

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BUSINESS SCHOOL OFFERS INNOVATIVE NEW MAJOR FOR ENTERPRISING STUDENTS

by John Varriale

News Reporter

Last year a handful of business students launched a group that may succeed in changing the way students in the College of Business Administration pursue their studies.

In December a faculty committee will vote on the Entrepreneur Group's proposal to offer "entrepreneurship" as a major for top students in the college.

If the proposal is passed by the college and campus administrators, and then approved by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board in Austin, UH will be one of the first universities in the nation to offer entrepreneurship as a major.

"Those students who were interested basically put their heads together and formed a group," said Regina Reeves, vice president in charge of Operations and Social Activities and group member.

Business College Executive Professor William W. Sherrill, who helped found the 25-member group, encouraged the students but let them determine the focus.

"He just let us be very creative with the organization," said Reeves. Students are not required to major in business to join the club.

According to Sherrill, several years ago Dean Jack Ivansevitch reviewed trends for business schools and came to the conclusion that international business and entrepreneurship were two areas of opportunity for the College of Business.

UH's Southwest Center for International Business was formed three years ago to help students tackle the first trend spotted by Ivansevitch -- international business.

Now the Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, a College of Business organization run by Sherrill, has turned its attention to entrepreneurship.

The proposal suggests students admitted to the entrepreneurship program be chosen from the top 30 applicants, according to Sherrill. The major will be made-up of six courses taken by students in their junior and senior years.

In the final course, students will be required to become an entrepreneur for a semester and work on getting a real or imaginary business off the ground. Students will negotiate with a variety of business professionals, such as, land lords, contractors, advertising firms and investors.

Even if the entrepreneurship major isn't approved, the college can teach the six courses on an experimental basis for the next two years. "It's more than a workshop, because it's actually hitting all the bricks," said Sherrill. "It's an exercise in reality."

Sherrill said there is a difference between innovation and entrepreneurship. Innovation is a new idea or a new twist on an old idea. Innovation is the heart of entrepreneurship, said Sherrill.

Entrepreneurship is taking a new idea or a new twist and turning it into a business. "If you buy a franchise, you're not an innovator," said Sherrill, "you're a small-business person."

So far, two members of the Entrepreneur Group have already opened new businesses. The group's president, business student Dale Toney, opened TheftTech, a shop that sells anti-theft systems for cars. Another former student opened Club Pet, a pet grooming and supply store.

 

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AUTHOR/PROF'S PORTRAYALS TAKE INTO ACCOUNT ROLE OF WHITE LIBERALS IN CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT

by Brett Lindsay

News Reporter

Rosa Parks and the Montgomery bus boycott helped lay the groundwork for the type of civil rights issues that prompted Dr. Linda Reed to write award-winning literature.

Reed, director of UH's African American Studies Program, won the 1992 Letitia Woods Brown Memorial Book Prize awarded by the Association of Black Women Historians.

"My study takes into account the cooperation of whites and blacks in the civil rights movement," Reed said. There has been little consideration of the fact that whites might have been involved in the struggle, she added.

Reed's book, <i>Simple Decency and Common Sense: The Southern Conference Movement, 1938 - 1963<p>, explores white Southern liberalism and its effect on the civil rights movement. In particular, she writes about the Southern Conference for Human Welfare and the Southern Conference Educational Fund, both based in her home state of Alabama.

Reed chose this topic when she discovered Durr's papers in the Montgomery state archives. Durr was head of the FCC during Franklin Delano Roosevelt's administration. He later returned to Alabama because of the Red Scare in the 1950s.

While there, he worked with the NAACP. They took court cases to him because they knew he was sympathetic to black issues, Reed said. Durr was one of the attorneys who represented Rosa Parks during her trial.

"That was my initial interest, but the more I found out about the organizations, the more significant it became to me," Reed said. And being in Alabama allowed her to keep her costs down.

Most surprising to Reed was the time people gave from their lives to help others. Even as late as the 1970s, the same people were concerned about the same issues as they were in the 1930s, Reed said. There have been some accomplishments, but not to the extent that they had hoped, she added.

Reed is working on a biography of Fannie Lou Hamer, a civil rights activist. Hamer tried to get blacks into the 1964 Democratic National Convention, but failed. Her struggle, however, led to representation for everyone in the future, Reed said. Hamer also worked with Freedom Farm, an organization that provided food and jobs for poor blacks.

She never had a formal education, but accomplished a lot because she was very practical and had common sense, Reed said. Because of similar backgrounds, Reed can relate to Hamer's struggles.

Reed has been at UH since August of 1989, and became the director of the African American Studies Program this semester. "I chose to come to UH because they were very interested in my research," Reed said.

 

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ADMINISTRATORS EXAMINE WAYS TO FOLLOW ADA RULES

by Melissa Neeley

Daily Cougar Staff

About 70 percent of workers between 18- and 65-year olds with disabilities in the United States are unemployed. As a result, the Americans with DisAbilities Act, passed in July, is prohibiting job discrimination based solely on an applicant's disability.

"We need to inform everyone on campus what the law means to them and how it will affect the university. For example, in telecommunications, the law requires that we have devices on campus that are accessible to the hearing-impaired," said Sandi Cherry, a representative of the Human Resources Department.

The ADA also protects spouses or dependents of employees at UH and other work-places who have disabilities; the spouse or dependent must be able to reach the employee in case an emergency arises, Cherry said.

More than 43 million Americans have physical or mental disabilities. According to a UH Human Resources Department guide to the ADA, public services and transportation, public accommodation, telecommunication services and state and local governments must give equal employment rights to people with disabilities.

ADA covers people with epilepsy, cancer, AIDS (or HIV positive), and those who are recovering drug abusers or alcoholics, the report said.

Alcoholics and drug addicts, however, cannot be using these substances if they want to be covered by the ADA, Cherry said.

A major life activity" -- walking, hearing, caring for oneself, working, speaking or seeing -- must be impaired for a person to be qualified as disabled by the ADA, the report said.

People recently testing positive for cerebral palsy, for example, are not affected by the ADA if they are not experiencing any symptoms of the disease, Cherry said.

Pay phones must be altered so that at least one in a group is placed 48 inches from the ground to allow access to people in wheelchairs, Cherry said.

Volume control on pay phones will also be featured for the hearing impaired, she said.

UH President James Pickering sent a survey to all department faculty asking about the accommodations needed on campus for people with disabilities, Cherry said.

"The survey asked them if there were appropriate signs and bathrooms for their departments. It also asked them to prioritize items especially important to make the campus more accessible," Cherry said.

The doors of the library, for example, are difficult to open because they are not electronic, therefore, this a major priority, she said.

"The Human Resources building has problems because it has two big doors you have to get through to get inside. They're heavy and hard for me (to maneuver). If I'm carrying a lot of books, I have to put them down to open the door," Cherry said.

The ADA guarantees "reasonable accommodation" to all employees with disabilities to ensure they can perform their jobs properly; employers, however, may be wary of giving their workers these accommodations because of the heavy financial burdens they may bring, Cherry said.

For example, if employees with a visual impairment wishes to have the newest voice-synthesized program for their computer instead of a personal reader, the employer can deny the request if it's too costly, Cherry said.

Also, at least one door to each building will be made accessible to people who are in wheelchairs until all the buildings are accommodating to them, she said.

Adrien Tanamachi works at KUHT and is interested in the ADA because she has a back problem that is becoming progressively worse, she said.

"I want to know more about the ADA as an employee, not an employer. People like myself are dealing possibly with job re-evaluation and restructuring," Tana-machi said.

By getting a good background on the ADA, Tanamachi said she can better understand her rights and the problems from her disability that might affect her career.

 

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BRIEFS

FELLOWSHIPS

Applications are now being accepted for three postdoctoral fellowships sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Health and Environmental Research and administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education.

The Alexander Hollaender Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellowship Program offers fellowships in the energy-related life, biomedical and environment sciences. Application deadline for the fellowship is Jan. 15, 1993.

The Human Genome Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellowships offer awards in disciplines of biology, chemistry, physics, engineering, mathematics and information science. The application deadline is Feb. 1, 1993.

The Global Change Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellowships offer research opportunities related to the U.S. Global Change Research Program and include climate modeling and predicting. Application deadline is Feb. 15, 1993.

For more information write to: Science/Engineering Education Division, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, P.O. Box 117, Oak Ridge, Tenn. 37831-0117, or call (615) 576-9975.

BUSINESS

UH-Clear Lake will sponsor a program Nov. 13-14 and Nov. 18-19 on how to fine-tune business supervisory and management skills. The Business Concepts program will deal with techniques of running a small business, including record keeping, marketing and developing a business plan.

For more information call: 283-3120.

JOB SEEKERS

UH Career Planning and Placement Center offers assistance for job seekers. The facility has an "Employer Contact List" available to students. The list includes the name of the contact person, address and telephone number of all employers that recruit at UH. This information can be used in researching and targeting future employers. The binder is available at the center's desk.

 

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AUTHOR INVESTIGATES SKIN-COLOR MYTH IN BLACK LOOKS

by Ericka Schiche

Daily Cougar Staff

Although the Anita Hill/Clarence Thomas hearings have been analyzed by countless writers, one essayist has taken a refreshing new look at the episode.

bell hooks (who doesn't capitalize her name) is the author of <i>Black Looks: Race and Representation<p>. She uses the confirmation hearings, a source of pain and embarrassment for the nation, and the way black women are presented in the mass media --especially in fashion advertisements -- as subjects for her 12-essay volume.

hooks, who taught at Yale University and teaches at Oberlin, has written six non-fiction books, including <i>Ain't I a Woman, Talking Back<p> and, with Cornel West, <i>Breaking Bread: Insurgent Black Intellectual Life.<p>

"They (the essays) represent my political struggle to push against the boundaries of image, to find words that express what I see, especially when I am looking in ways that move against the grain, when I am seeing things that most folks want to believe simply are not there," wrote hooks in her introduction to the essays.

"Loving Blackness as Political Resistance," one of the most brilliantly written of the essays, tackles a difficult subject: how black people who love themselves and their culture are sometimes perceived as inherently threatening.

In this essay, hooks writes on such topics as the vision of cultural homogeneity, denial on the part of whites and blacks, separatism, and subjugation.

She draws on her experiences within the classroom as examples of how blindness is not limited to lack of eyesight.

An essay about the Clarence Thomas confirmation hearings is worth noting because throughout her strong analysis, none of the groups involved is left holding the bag alone; hooks criticizes some of Anita Hill's advisers, holds a magnifying glass to some feminist groups, analyzes Clarence Thomas and his statement about "high tech lynching," and discusses the shameless senators.

Other subjects she addresses in the essays include black masculinity, Jenny Livingston's film <i>Paris is Burning<p>, the similarities between Native Americans and African Americans, and how white people are perceived by black people.

Each essay probes -- some more successfully than others -- into the darkest places of the collective conscience. When she is at her best, hooks makes a convincing case of showing how judgment based on skin color and popular myth alone is faulty.

 

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PROF. DISCUSSES IRONY OF NON-MAINSTREAM WRITER

by Kimberly Copelin

News Reporter

A portrait on a stamp prompted a new study into literature, authority and pop culture by a UH English professor.

Dr. Elizabeth Gregory gave a presentation titled "Marianne Moore and Pop Culture: Gendered Slumming," before a filled Embassy Room in the UC last Thursday.

Marianne Moore is a popular 20th century poet and essayist whose portrait appeared on a U.S. stamp in 1990.

"This posed a lot of questions," Gregory said.

"Why choose Moore for a stamp? What does Moore have in common with this authority?" Gregory asked.

Moore's poetry questioned authority and established her as an authoritative figure, Gregory said.

Moore's earlier works are modern and high cultured. Even though many critics admitted they didn't understand her work, they agreed it was good, Gregory said.

"Moore intended to invest herself into the elite society and the elite-of-the-elite in her own pursuit of authority," Gregory said.

Moore's earlier poems cast a direct challenge to authority, Gregory said.

In later years, Moore's work and lifestyle began to slip into the popular culture.

Moore often wore tree-cornered hats and a cape which fastened with a silver dollar and gave her the look of George Washington. This change in dress is what Gregory referred to as "gender slurring."

Moore's work began to question the authority of popular stars.

Gregory compared Moore's poetic authority to the authority of advertisers.

"[Her poems say] one thing and then the opposite and then both. This causes uneasiness in the reader and causes them to question the authority," said Gregory.

In advertising, the sponsor delivers a message which consumers know it isn't true and causes disbelief, Gregory said.

"Images on stamps reassure the public that our culture will continue to flourish," said Gregory.

 

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FREE-SPEECH BILL HAILED AS BOTH RESTRICTIVE, APPROPRIATE

WASHINGTON (CPS) -- The Senate has opened a potentially lengthy and contentious debate on a bill that would ban universities from receiving federal dollars if they impose codes restricting offensive speech on campus.

At issue is a bill introduced by Sen. Larry Craig, R-Idaho, who says speech codes violate the First Amendment, despite good intentions.

"Schools today have a world of options available to them in fighting incidents of harassment," Craig said. But one option he says they must not try is "stripping students of their right to speak out."

Craig's plan drew sharp criticism in a September hearing before the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee. Kenya Welch, head of the minority council at Clemson University, said the bill would foster ignorance on college campuses and do little to ensure equity in education.

"Where a person is verbally or physically tormented, badgered, heckled or persecuted or is under constant fear of this occurring because of his or her race, sex, religion or sexual orientation, a quality education is an intangible goal," Welch said.

The Clemson senior also told the panel about several incidents of racially offensive speech directed at her on the university's campus. "I was shocked, hurt, angry, ashamed, confused ... but I decided to stick it out," she said.

Craig, however, countered that his bill is designed not to defend harassment, but to protect the right to free speech.

Speech restrictions "destroy the best weapon any of us has to fight against harassment," he said.

Discussion of this bill comes at a key moment in the debate on campus speech codes. Just recently, the University of Wisconsin repealed its code barring hate speech in light of a U.S. Supreme Court rule overturning a St. Paul, Minn., hate crime law. Federal courts have struck down a University of Michigan speech code as well.

In the aftermath of these decisions, some witnesses sought a more neutral ground by encouraging lawmakers to support campus efforts toward greater understanding among students.

"Colleges and universities are responding to racial and sexual harassment on campuses in many more effective ways than the adoption of speech codes," said Hoke Smith, president of Towson State University in Maryland.

At Towson, the school offers courses on sexual, racial and ethnic issues and supports them with a disciplinary system with formal hearings as well as counseling sessions. "Informal procedures are normally very effective," he said.

Smith said he personally found speech codes counterproductive, but he opposed the Craig bill as well. If approved, the legislation will "inhibit rather than further the educational process by which conflicts will be fruitfully addressed."

In effect, Smith said the debate over speech codes already has raised the level of debate on the issue and created an opportunity to find better solutions to problems. This on-going educational process needs no new restrictions from the federal government, he said.

College and university leaders also added that the Craig bill would do little to address the debate about "politically correct" speech and conduct on campus. But the bill could introduce a new level of government regulation in higher education.

"Any problems in speech and relationships arising from intolerance are best dealt with on campus as an educational, not regulatory, issue," said Melvin George, representing the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities.

Speaking for NAICU, George said he opposed the measure, calling new government regulation "an unprecedented and unwarranted action."

While policy makers debate the worth of speech codes and the Craig bill, Clemson's Welch noted that the campus climate for many students -- particularly minorities -- remains difficult.

After encountering incidents of harassment, Welch said she began to think that respect "was an unattainable goal." Such a climate does not promote access to a quality education, she added.

Craig says the bill, called the Freedom of Speech on Campus Act, is a starting point for discussion in Congress. In the House, Rep. Henry Hyde, R-Ill., has introduced a similar bill on speech policies.

 

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PEZMAN'S BLOCK VOTED BEST PLAY

by Adam King

Daily Cougar Staff

A hero emerged from the chaos of the TCU game last Saturday to lift the Cougars to a strange 49-46 win that saw Houston turn the ball over nine times.

Middle linebacker Chris Pezman smashed through the middle of the Horned Frogs' line on fourth down and blocked Kevin Cordesman's punt that set UH up at the TCU 18-yard line. Sherman Smith scored on quarterback Jimmy Klingler's 11-yard pass to put the Frogs away for good.

Those series of events seem even stranger because Pezman, Klingler and Smith went to Stratford High School together.

"The one (play) that I really felt was the clincher, I'm talking about the one that slammed the door shut on them, was his punt block," Coach John Jenkins said. "To come through the blocker and get that punt blocked is one of the finest plays I've seen."

Pezman plays inspired special-teams football and always seems to be the first defender down the field in coverage situations.

"Quite honestly, I play a lot for my mom," Pezman said. "My mom is sick. She hasn't had a lot of opportunity to make it to any of the games. I don't think my mom's ever seen me play other than on television, so I just try to do whatever I can to get my name mentioned.

"That way she knows I'm out on the field making a contribution."

She also knows when someone is making a mistake.

In the early part of this season and in seasons past, Mike Edmonds, who does play-by-play for UH football radio, had referred to Chris Pezman as Carlos Pezman. During the Michigan game, Edmonds said Pezman's mother, Daria, called to tell him how much she enjoyed listening to him but would he please get her son's name right. Edmonds wasted no time in writing 'Chris Pezman' on several large signs and placing them all over the press box.

Edmonds said since that day he's never forgotten to say 'Chris' instead of 'Carlos.'

And Pezman has never forgotten to do his job. While most special team players never get a blocked punt during their career, Pezman already has three.

Last year against Southern Methodist, he partially blocked a punt and limited it to 20 yards. The Cougars drove down to the end zone, but Donald Douglas threw an interception to come away with nothing. On SMU's next possession, the Mustangs had a fourth-and-seven on their 23-yard line. This time, Pezman got all of the ball, knocking it down to the 2-yard line where strong safety Michael Newhouse ran it in for a touchdown.

About his most recent block, Pezman said, "It felt pretty good. I didn't really think I was going to get a chance to make a block, and when I made contact, the next thing I knew I was looking for the ball.

"I didn't realize (the NCAA) counted blocked punts as return yardage, so right now I'm averaging about 19, 20 yards a return."

Pezman will once again go up against the team he's had so much success defending when Houston travels to Dallas this Saturday to meet the Mustangs in Ownby Stadium.

 

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DAVALOS TO INTERVIEW

by Keith Rollins

Daily Cougar Staff

UH Athletic Director Rudy Davalos is in Albuquerque getting ready to interview tomorrow and Friday for the University of New Mexico's athletic director position.

Davalos, who has been with UH for five years, may take the job if enough money is offered.

He earns $108,000 at UH. New Mexico's AD Gary Ness is under contract through the remainder of the year for approximately $83,000.

The three other finalists named by New Mexico for the job are Oklahoma State AD Jim Garner, Toledo AD Allen Bohl and Kentucky Associate AD Gene DeFilippo.

DeFilippo is finishing his two-day interview today and Davalos will start Thursday morning.

Sports Information Director Ted Nance has been mentioned as a possible replacement if Davalos leaves Houston.

 

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VOLLEYBALL NOTEBOOK

by Heather Ellis

Daily Cougar Staff

Even though the end of the regular volleyball season is in sight, the road to the championship is not without with a few speed bumps. Tonight the Lady Cougars will run over one such bump as they face the ever-ready Aggies at College Station.

Houston is still tied with Texas for first place in the SWC with a 7-1 record. The team is also ranked 24th in the AVCA poll.

Even though the Cougars are playing very well right now, Coach Bill Walton does not want to take any game lightly, especially against the Aggies.

"Playing A&M at home is tough because their home crowd is always fired up. We need to be prepared," he said.

A&M is resting in the middle of the SWC pack with a 3-5 record and fourth place.

Last season, the Lady Aggies finished conference play in fourth place with a 5-5 record and were 18-16 overall. The Cougars led the series 25-20.

Because of strong communication both on and off the court, the Lady Cougars know that their goals for the season may be fulfilled.

"We are now at a point in the season where if we have any humps, we can communicate and get over them. We are getting better at that," Coach Walton said.

One of the keys to success for the rest of the season is for the team to gain strength and aim for a perfect finish.

"Our goal after we play A&M is to gain momentum over the next two weeks and go the rest of the season without a loss." said Coach Walton.

Still perfecting their trade, the Lady Cougars headed down to the good ol' South Halloween weekend, where they split a set of matches.

The team's first match was against 12th ranked LSU. It was a quick match for the Lady Tigers who felled the Cougars in three games 12-15, 8-15 and 7-15.

The next day, Houston regained its vim and vigor and took the Lady Rebels down in three games 15-3, 15-12, and 15-3.

 

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Cougar Clips-

--UH punt returner Jamie Mouton was awarded the AT&T Long Distance Award this week. Mouton ran back a 78-yard punt for a touchdown. He also leads the SWC with 15.5 yards per punt.

--Houston's run-and-shoot offense is ranked No. 1 in the nation in both total offense (3,388 yards, 6.4 yds/play, 484 yds/game) and passing offense (224-376, 18 int., 22TDs, 59.6%, 2,539 yards, 6.8 yds/play, 362.7 yds/game).

--Sherman Smith is the leading receiver in the nation with 8.3 receptions per game.

--QB Donald Douglas practiced Tuesday for the first time in a week, but his mobility is still limited due to sprained arches.

--Ex-Cougar golfer Fred Couples is the leading candidate for PGA's Golfer of the Year Award. He has already won the Palmer Trophy as leading money-winner and the Vardon Trophy for lowest average scoring on tour at 69.38.

 

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PANEL SAYS RAPISTS STRIVE TO BE SEXUAL AGGRESSORS

ORLANDO, Fla. (CPS) -- Men and drinking can be a potentially dangerous mix for women, researchers of sexual assault said recently at a conference on campus rape.

More than 500 deans, faculty members and campus security personnel met for a three day conference in early October to discuss sexual assault on campuses.

"Rape is an emotionally charged issue that colleges can deal with," said Bernice Sandler, who works at the Center for Women Policy Studies in Washington, D.C. "Campus rape affronts women who haven't been raped. All women are vulnerable. It also has an impact on men. They need to have better relationships with women."

Indeed, there were several presentations that focused on men and why they rape. Mary Koss, who works at the College of Medicine at the University of Arizona, presented some statistics from a poll done at an upstate New York college. The survey found 80 percent of the male respondents wanted to dominate a woman, enjoyed the conquest of sex, and had the attitude that some women look like they're "just asking" to be raped.

"Men are attracted to the idea of them being the sexual aggressor. Men negotiate relationships based on myths, so men can misinterpret information," she said. Rape is an anger crime. Rape can infer a desire to dominate."

There are demographic characteristics in males who rape, including being hostile to women, hyper masculinity, aggressive behavior, drug use and being a dangerous driver, she said. Additionally, the date rapist tends to have had more sexual partners than other men.

In studies Koss did, she found 75 percent of the perpetrators had been drinking when the date rape occurred, and 50 percent of the victims had been drinking. Alcohol itself won't lead to arousal, since it's a depressant, she said; rather, it builds the expectation of sex. A man who is drunk is likely to be directly aggressive with a woman, and after a rape occurs, blames the alcohol and not his own actions.

Of 460 men Koss surveyed at the University of Arizona, 5 percent of the victims had raped a woman and 9 percent said they had tried.

What is important to remember, said Jay Friedman, who gave a lecture on how the media depicts sex, alcohol and power, is that "rape is never, never, never the woman's fault. Men will force a woman to have sex to prove he's heterosexual. Men become more physical when their hormones rage. Women want emotional and verbal support."

Although alcohol is a factor in date rapes, Koss discounted the notion that fraternities are filled with potential rapists. "The place of residence does not predict sexual aggression. It is people who are aggressive and not the environment," she said.

However, an environment which does foster sexual aggression is sports, she said, especially such revenue sports as football and basketball. Athletes tend to feel elite and special, and live in an environment that "reinforces dominance on another person. They can be insensitive to body size," Koss said.

Sandler, with the Center for Women Policy Studies, said colleges and universities are at legal risk if there are no policies regarding rape and sexual harassment. Additionally, schools must develop and publicize educational programs dealing with rape, have explicit rights posted for rape victims and work with the court systems and police in rape cases, she said.

"Rape is a felony that must be handled differently from other campus judicial procedures," she said. "Rape is not about sex."

 

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