PROJECT PAIRS MENTORS, KIDS

by Scherilyn Ishop

News Reporter

The UH Can Do Project creates partnerships between at-risk sixth-graders and UH students from similar backgrounds in order to make a difference in the lives of both.

Project coordinator, Ronique Gordon said, she hopes to reach out to 60 sixth-graders at Cullen Middle School who have behavioral problems and perform below average levels in school.

"We're trying to help kids who are identified as high risk," she said.

Project coordinators said they want to present younger students with an alternative roll model to what is commonly seen in their lives. The Can Do tutor/mentor program is designed to help keep school children off the streets and interested in academics, Gordon said.

"Role models are very important and the tutors will not only help them with their school work, but will act as mentors as well," she said.

Since Cullen Middle School is 97 percent black, the program is looking for minority tutors. Gordon said she would prefer African-American students on financial aid so the sixth graders may identify with their mentor.

Tia English, the principal investigator who oversees the administration of the project, said the reason for forming the program was to reach high-risk students at a young age before they are able to form bad habits and slip through the cracks in the system.

"The initial concern was black males in the criminal justice system," English said. "We wanted to form a program to provide positive influences for students in danger of following that path."

"That's why we focused on sixth graders, because they are young enough to head off negative consequences in their lives," she said.

Nikki Bass, a junior accounting major, said she chose to tutor because she wants to make a difference in the lives of children and give back to the community.

"It's really a good project, because high risk students need guidance in their lives," she said.

"They need people to encourage them to achieve their goals beyond middle school, high school and even beyond college.

"I was blessed with parents who gave me very good guidance, and I hope I can provide that to someone who wasn't that fortunate," Bass said.

Tutors must be available between 3:30 and 5:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday to help with academic studies, and Saturdays from 9:30-11:30 a.m. for sports and recreational activities, Gordon said.

Qualified students interested in being a mentor/tutuor can contact Ronique Gordon at 743-8642.

 

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UH'S STUDENT-FACULTY RATIO HIGH

by Yonca Poyraz-Dogan

Daily Cougar Staff

The annual U.S. News & World Report survey of America's best colleges ranked the University of Houston 131 out of 204 national research universities and more than 2,500 four-year institutions nationwide.

The score for faculty resources, however, fell short of the academic ranking. The magazine derived the faculty resources ranking of 146 in part from student-faculty ratio.

UH’s student-faculty ratio is 21-to-1, meaning 21 students for every faculty member. And although enrollment has steadily climbed, the number of full-time faculty has steadily decreased.

In the fall of 1983 the university had 914 full-time faculty for 30,500 students. There were about 2,500 more students and nine fewer faculty to teach them in the fall of 1992.

The 21-to-1 student-faculty ratio was the second highest of the 50 universities falling into the third quartile -- those ranked 103-153. The highest belongs to Texas Tech University with a 25-to-1 ratio. St. Louis University had the lowest in the group with a 7-to-1 ratio.

UH's biggest colleges such as Natural Sciences and Mathematics; Humanities, Fine Arts and Communication; Business Administration; Social Sciences, and Education have had to accommodate more students with fewer professors.

The College of Social Sciences' biggest department, psychology, is short six professors, said Dean Harrell Rodgers. In 1983 about 2,000 students were enrolled in the college. The student-faculty ratio was 21-to-1 in 1983.

Rodgers said every semester 5,500 students take classes in the college, and 115 faculty members teach. "It is an awfully, terrible ratio," he said.

"We turn classes over to graduate students or hire outside people who usually have their Ph.D.s and work for the industry," said Rodgers. "Even if the students give a good evaluation to graduate students, they say that they would like to have a full professor."

The number of teaching assistants was 378 in the fall of 1983, but had increased to 1,011 last fall, according to statistics kept by the Office of Planning and Policy Analysis.

Dean John Bear of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics has been at the university for 30 years. He said the student-faculty ratio used to be smaller, but added that tenure-line faculty size, which includes some of the professors, associate and assistant professors, has not been increased much since then.

"Teaching is not fun anymore," Bear said. Every semester about 10,000 students take mathematics, 5,000 take biology and 5,000 take chemistry in the college. Students have particular difficulty getting into the labs, he said.

The College of Humanities, Fine Arts and Communication also has crowded classes in some of its departments. Sophomore English, sophomore and freshman Spanish, art, cultural heritage, logic and philosophy classes are among the most crowded ones, Lawrence Curry, associate dean of HFAC, said.

Sometimes the department gives students permission to take off-campus courses, especially English and Spanish, he said.

Curry said that to compensate for the scarcity of full professors, either teaching assistants or lecturers must teach more classes.

"We'd rather have permanent money to allow us to hire faculty, but that's not going to happen," Curry said.

Curry said every department in HFAC is looking at ways to manage teaching with fewer resources. Offering classes in larger sections or TV instruction may be options, he said.

"The university is not state supported. It is just assisted by the state," Curry said.

Both Bear and Rodgers said the quality of education will be in jeopardy if the state doesn't give more support. Bear said the only way to improve the situation is more money.

Bear said, on one hand, the Texas Legislature wants the university to improve the quality of the education by putting more tenure track people in charge. But, on the other hand, UH must do the opposite because of lack of money.

The catch-22 situation is not likely to change for the university. UH's $8.5 million budget cut will be split up in the budget biennium. UH will lose $2.6 million in 1994-95 and $5.9 million in 1995-96.

Student-faculty ratio also affects graduate students, who comprise one-third of the student population. David Judkins, director of graduate studies in the Department of English said the department doesn't accept more than 15 students for seminars and the number of courses is limited.

"(Students) can’t get the classes they want. They don’t move through the programs as quickly as they want," he said.

Judkins, who has been at UH for 22 years, said classes were less crowded 10 or 15 years ago. He said the department hires part-time unranked faculty or teaching assistants instead of ranked and full-time faculty.

On the other hand, President James Pickering said hiring part-time faculty from the community is advantageous for the students. He said the the university has extraordinary part-time faculty members, who have worked in the fields they teach.

"It’s a budget matter. I see no way that (the number of full-time faculty) is going to improve," said Glenn Aumann, senior vice president for Academic Affairs.

"You can at least hire a person who is who is very competent in the subject matter," he said.

Aumann also said the Houston community has enough expertise in law, architecture, business, technology, optometry, pharmacy and social work.

However, he said UH should have enough faculty members to provide counseling to students, set policies and help with recruitment and admission.

"Students are not being put in front of inexperienced teachers who are learning how to teach. They are facing more classes taught by professionals who are here part-time," Aumann said.

The student population will stay around 30,000, he added.

Other criteria used to determine the faculty resource ranking was taken from the percentage of full-time faculty with doctorates or other top degrees, the percentage of faculty with part-time status and the percentage of faculty with Ph.D.s.

 

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WITCH AND ZOMBIE SPOOKY CHILLS

by Frank San Miguel

Daily Cougar Staff

Witches have been burned at the stake, pilloried, torn apart by mobs and villified for natural disasters attributed to their sorcery. Those incantors once slain are nothing as formidable as <I>The Ultimate Witch<P>.

Likewise, denizens of the undead populate the darkest recesses of mythology, but none is stronger than <I>The Ultimate Zombie<P>.

Some of the greatest contemporary horror, fantasy and suspense writers – including Anne Rice, Dean Koontz and Tanith Lee – combine forces for a literary coven of the most diverse kind with <I>The Ultimate Witch<P> and <I>The Ultimate Zombie<P>.

This pair of original short story compendiums celebrate the much-maligned magicians and walking dead respectively.

<I>The Ultimate Witch<P> casts the witch not as a cauldron-coddling harpy but as real as people everyday. <I>The Ultimate Zombie<P> attempts a similar presentation, albeit less effectively.

Each book is less chilling than perplexing. Witches and zombies are not eating children or scampering about graveyards, at least not in most of the tales.

Some witches are practical people employing the craft to daily questions, while the evil of others is much more complex than the cackling, ride-a-broomstick toons on television. Some use spells, one uses a crocus flower, another uses a broomstick. It is these depths of dastardliness that pick at the reader's mind.

Zombies could be anyone, and the deaths to which they succumb can be psychological and spiritual, thus bringing new facets to living death. A zombie might not even be dead, but the life it leads can be far worse than a trip to the harp farm.

Even creepier, just because you're dead doesn't mean you don't know it or aren't alert.

Both books are excellent in terms of creativity and sheer writing quality. <I>Witch<P> opens with S. P. Somtow's "Gingerbread," a back-alley tale of child abuse, fundamentalism, child prostitution and the witch as a glamorous pimp.

Similarly, Somtow's opener for <I>Zombie<P>, "Though I Walk Through the Valley," delves into East L.A. barrio life to tell the story of an abused boy who was dead when he was born.

The stories are varied. <I>Zombie<P>'s "The Toddler Pit" by A. R. Morlan brings new meaning to kiddie staples like sleep-overs.

<I>Witch<P>'s "Easy Tom and the Seven Highways to Constantinople and All Points South," from Jonathan Bond and Thomas J. Lindell, seems to combine zombies and witches in a story of mobsters now and in the Middle Ages.

Some pieces, like Anne Rice's "The Doctor" and Geoffrey A. Landis' "Dead Right" from <I>Zombie<P>, are a real let down, as they are predictable and bland.

Yet these are redeemed only a few pages later by innovative and thought-provoking works like Robert Silverbreg's the-future-is-now "Passengers." It is likely such unevenness in <I>Zombie<P> that casts a shadow of a doubt, although it's still good.

After all, there are a limited number of situations in which a writer can put an undead person, and it runs low after a few chapters.

<I>Witch<P>'s finest tales include Darrell Schweitzer's winding "The Sorcerer Evvoragdou" and Paco Ignacio Taiso II's street-justice-style "The Sweet Smell of Success." It's all the better that each yarn from the books is original and only appears here.

<I>Zombie<P> keeps up a degree of great texts by the likes of Frances A. McMahan's immense "House of Lazarus" and Nina Kiriki Hoffman's "The Third Dead Body." The stories here are good showings on contemporary horror fiction, but, when it comes to brass tacks, <I>Witch<P> is the winner.

Actually, the reader wins in the end.

 

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VIVA EVITA

ARGENTINA'S FIRST WOMAN HITS TOWN

by Tom Vinh

Contributing Writer

Don’t cry for me Argentina. I’ll be in Houston today.

It’s been about 13 years since the smash Broadway hit <I>Evita<P> first premiered in New York. The show boasts music by Andrew Lloyd Webber and lyrics by Tim Rice, who recently collaborated with Alan Menken for the soundtrack of Disney’s <I>Aladdin<P>. Rice and Webber’s other Broadway hits include <I>Cats<P> and <I>Jesus Christ Superstar<P>.

<I>Evita<P> is based on the colorful and compelling life of Eva Peron, one of the first contemporary dragon ladies of power. Her rise from the poverty-stricken streets of Argentina to one of the richest, most powerful women in the world – as the first lady of Argentina – makes this musical intriguing even without the music and dance.

But it is the music and choreography that make this musical extra special. Latin rhythms and sensual fiery dances combine to excite and move the audience throughout the performance. The highlight of <I>Evita<P>’s celebrated score is the hauntingly beautiful "Don’t Cry For Me Argentina."

The lead role of Eva Peron stars Donna Marie Ashbury, who is the youngest actress ever to perform the role. She has starred in other musicals such as the Stephen Sondheim/Hal Prince musical <I>Merrily We Roll Along<P> and the Howard Ashman/Marvin Hamlish musical <I>Smile<P>.

The director and choreographer is Larry Fuller, whose other credits include the original <I>Evita<P>, which won a bucket load of awards including seven Tonys, <I>Sweeney Todd<P>, which won eight Tonys, and the much heralded <I>Merrily We Roll Along<P>.

 

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CONTEST OFFERS HOUSTON COLLEGES CREATIVE NETWORK

by Sarah Myers

Contributing Writer

Although there are six Houston universities within an area of about 556 square miles, only rarely do they interact scholastically.

Those involved with the UH Intercollegiate Fall Fiction Contest want to see that change.

The Writers and Artists Group of UH (WAAGAUH) is sponsoring a writing contest for all Houston area colleges. The contest’s motto is "to build a channel of communication and open a pathway of cooperation, as well as to promote the literary and artistic talents of the student community in the Houston area."

Along with submissions from UH students, WAAGAUH welcomes submissions from students attending Rice, Texas Southern University, Houston Baptist University and UH Downtown.

"This is the first time that there has been an intercollegiate writing contest for the schools of Houston, ever," said Jessica Martin, UH senior creative writing major and president of WAAGAUH.

Organizers hope a network of Houston colleges will help focus attention on the city’s academic community and serve to illustrate what the schools have to offer, Martin said.

Even though Houston is home to six universities, it’s not the typical college town.

"I think that (the contest) will be a great boost to Houston academic life," said Louis Markos, assistant professor of English and contest chairman at HBU.

While specifically promoting intercollegiate scholastics, organizers also want the contest to call attention to UH’s creative writing program as well as furthering the development of creative writing departments at other Houston schools, Martin said.

UH is the only Houston college offering a creative writing major.

In the meantime, TSU is following the UH example and developing a creative writing minor program.

The idea for this contest originated after the tremendous response to a poetry contest sponsored by WAAGAUH last spring.

After the poetry contest’s huge success, WAAGAUH members wanted to form some type of fiction contest, Martin said. They decided to model a fiction event after a contest held among a group of East Coast schools.

By consolidating, the schools, the contest should be more representative of the student talent in the entire Houston area, Martin said. She said having several schools also increases the magnitude of the contest and stimulates greater awareness of the artistic and scholastic communities.

"This is just one of the many ways we encourage art on campus," Martin said. WAAGAUH also publishes the only undergraduate literary magazine on campus, <P>The Virus Board<P>, and sponsors <P>Open Performance Evenings<P>, which are held in the Student Life Plaza.

To enter the contest, writers must submit their work to the UH Creative Writing Department, Honors College or the WAAGAUH box located in the U.C. Underground.

Only undergraduates are eligible to participate. Entries may consists of any type of fiction less than 3000 words.

Officials are asking that students submit two manuscript copies. One copy should include the writer’s name, address and phone number. A second copy should exclude any personal information to ensure unbiased judging. Deadline for entries is Friday.

 

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INVOLVEMENT KEY TO 'COMING OUT'

by shane patrick boyle

Daily Cougar Staff

The metaphor of "coming out of the closet" applies to the process gays and lesbians go through in acknowledging their sexual orientation to themselves, friends, family or co-workers.

National Coming Out Day (sometimes celebrated as Coming Out Week) was established in 1988 to encourage gays and lesbians to come out.

Greg Cason, one of the national coordinators for the original Coming Out Day, spoke at UH Monday during a Coming Out Day rally sponsored by the Gay, Lesbian Or Bisexual Alliance.

Cason lived in Los Angeles at the time he was working on the national committee, but for the past year he has been living in Houston. He works for Montrose Counseling Center and is a UH graduate student in psychology.

The point of National Coming Out Day is not to pull people out of the closet, said Cason.

"Some are more out than others," he said. "The point is to encourage them to take next step and do one more thing on their path to coming out."

For some, he said, this could mean taking a small step such as reading a book on a gay topic. For others, it could mean "challenging fag jokes" at work, coming out to parents or joining an organization.

Cason, who is now 30 years old, said he came out to his mother when he was 19, and she is only recently coming to accept it.

He said his father, on the other hand, disowned him. "So I experienced both extremes," he said.

In coming out to parents, Cason advises patience. "Realize that if it took you six to eight years to come to terms, it may take them that long," he said.

Resources he recommended are a book called <I>Loving Someone Gay<P> by Don Clark and an organization called Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays.

"(College) is a difficult time to come out, because many people in college are judgmental and think they know what the world is all about," said Cason who was not "out" on campus as an UCLA undergraduate.

"I lived in a dorm with a gay roommate and neither of us knew the other was gay until we ran into each other at a bar five years later," he said.

Organizations like G.L.O.B.AL. are a good resource, Cason said. "But joining G.L.O.B.AL. may be a scary step for someone just coming out."

Some of the obstacles to coming out on campus Cason commented on include the psychology classes that primarily limit discussions about gays to abnormal psychology or human sexuality classes.

He also said the free counseling on campus "may or may not be a good place."

"Graduates in psychology receive no training in gay issues other than being told that (homosexuality) used to be classified as a disorder and it’s not anymore," Cason said.

Cason said some counselors encourage people to stay in the closet, but said counselors sensitive to gay issues can be found.

"The university (of Houston) has a non-discrimination policy that covers sexual orientation," he said. "But it’s not taken seriously."

Cason said the policy should be enforced to allow same-gender partners to be recognized as spouses for financial aid and university health insurance.

It is difficult for faculty and students to come out on campus even today, Cason said. "Gays are treated as second-class citizens.

"I would ask the straight person who thinks gays have equal rights to wear a ‘Gay and Proud’ T-shirt and go through (his or her) normal day and just see what happens," he said.

Cason said coming out is a powerful way to fight homophobia. As more people come out "it creates a domino effect to knock over hatred and prejudice."

"But it takes individuals (coming out)," Cason said.

"It can’t happen through the media," he said. "It takes people to change attitudes."

 

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HARD-CORE WORKOUT KEEPS ROTC STUDENT FOCUSED

by Lawrence J. Leonard

Contributing Writer

Could it be the thrill of watching Tom Cruise in <I>Top Gun<P>" learning to be an ace fighter pilot and leader that motivates a small group of men and women to join the U.S. Armed Forces every year?

Most members of the military would disagree. Movies by themselves don’t motivate people to serve. There must be some other kind of conviction in the hearts of these people.

So says David Castro Salazar, a UH junior MIS major, who describes this as confidence in himself and the U.S. Marine Corps.

Last summer, Salazar began the Platoon Leader Course (PLC), a series of Marine officer training camps held for two consecutive summers in Quantico, Va.

Among the 178 people who contracted and made it through the first summer training camp, Salazar graduated fifth in his class. He said after this session in P.L.C. he returned to Houston with more confidence in himself.

Salazar said P.L.C. also taught him many things about being a U.S. Marine.

"When I first signed up I wanted to fly – be a fly boy, the whole bit," he said. "Now that I know more about (the Marines), and (have) been through the ground part, ground is something I would like to do, too."

When each summer training camp is over, Salazar is discharged from military life and must refocus on solving computer programs at UH.

Until next summer Salazar said he will devote his time to training his mind and keeping his body in shape. Then it’s back to Virginia for a second summer with P.L.C.

Salazar was introduced to the military early on. His father was an Army Ranger during Vietnam.

After Salazar graduated from Westfield High School in Spring, Texas, he had several offers to join "special teams." He was also offered a football scholarship to play at Iowa State and was recruited as an Air Force Academy cadet.

After turning down both academic offers, Salazar came to UH.

"People don’t give UH all the credit it’s due. It’s a good school," he said.

Salazar said after next summer, he’ll have completed the remainder of his officer training.

When he graduates he will be commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the Marine Corps, but he said "I am (still) not ready to take charge of men.

"You have to go to the Basic School which is seven months long," he said. "The purpose of this is to put the finishing touches on you, so you’re really a sharp officer and know what you’re doing. P.L.C. molds you into a sword, and the Basic School puts the edge on you. "

 

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DALLAS COMPANY LOOKS TO YANK THE CHAIN WITH A QUICKER STICK

SOUTHWEST CONFERENCE SCHOOLS TRYING NEW MEASURER

by Ryan Carssow

Daily Cougar Staff

The game is on the line.

The lines crew trots on to the field and lays out the chains. Their accuracy will determine the outcome of the football game.

Mike Carter of Dalco Athletic, based in Dallas, wants this to change. Dalco has produced what Carter said is a better alternative to the chain measuring device.

It is called the Quick Stick, a chainless measuring device that offers quicker, safer and more accurate measurements than the conventional chain, Carter said.

"Eventually, we feel it has an opportunity to replace the chain," Carter said.

"It’s much different from the chains," said Assistant Director for Intramurals Mark Kuhlmann, who is looking into the possibility of bringing the Quick Stick to the University of Houston.

Texas A&M is using the Quick Stick this season. Mike Feldman, a member of the Aggie lines crew, doesn’t see the need to replace the old, reliable chain.

"I don’t know why they want to fix something that isn’t broken," Feldman said. "In fifteen years, we never had a problem with the chain."

The Quick Stick uses a solid pole that swings out from the base pole in place of the chain. Only one base pole is needed instead of the two used with chain measurements.

The use of one pole makes the Quick Stick quicker and safer, Carter said.

"Quick Stick immediately goes onto the field," he said. "It’s gone before anyone notices it’s on the field. It’s safer because it’s chainless.

"Chains tend to get tangled in the wires from coaches’ headsets. People can also trip over the chain."

"I’ve never seen or heard of anybody getting hit by a chain," Feldman said.

Carter said the Quick Stick also promotes improved accuracy.

"It’s as accurate as a chain, if not more so," he said.

The pole on a chain device is smaller in diameter than a yard line, making it slightly inaccurate. The base of the Quick Stick is the same width as a regulation yard line. Also, the slide mechanism that centers the device is lockable.

"As far as accuracy, I don’t think it’s any better or worse," Feldman said.

"There is a question of whether it is more exact," Kuhlmann said. "Officiating is not an exact science anyway."

Houston experimented with the Quick Stick in its first home game Sept. 11 against Tulsa. However, Kuhlmann said no decision will be made until the spring on whether to use the device full time.

"They (the UH lines crew) said they wouldn’t mind using it," Kuhlmann said. "They got it down. It takes a while to understand. (Houston) Coach (Kim) Helton didn’t want to act on it now. He has other things to worry about."

Dalco supplies sideline equipment to 95 percent of NFL teams and to schools from high school to the NCAA level.

Texas A&M and Baylor are the only Southwest Conference schools currently using the Quick Stick.

 

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UH'S STUDENT-FACULTY RATIO HIGH

by Yonca Poyraz-Dogan

Daily Cougar Staff

The annual U.S. News & World Report survey of America's best colleges ranked the University of Houston 131 out of 204 national research universities and more than 2,500 four-year institutions nationwide.

The score for faculty resources, however, fell short of the academic ranking. The magazine derived the faculty resources ranking of 146 in part from student-faculty ratio.

UH’s student-faculty ratio is 21-to-1, meaning 21 students for every faculty member. And although enrollment has steadily climbed, the number of full-time faculty has steadily decreased.

In the fall of 1983 the university had 914 full-time faculty for 30,500 students. There were about 2,500 more students and nine fewer faculty to teach them in the fall of 1992.

The 21-to-1 student-faculty ratio was the second highest of the 50 universities falling into the third quartile -- those ranked 103-153. The highest belongs to Texas Tech University with a 25-to-1 ratio. St. Louis University had the lowest in the group with a 7-to-1 ratio.

UH's biggest colleges such as Natural Sciences and Mathematics; Humanities, Fine Arts and Communication; Business Administration; Social Sciences, and Education have had to accommodate more students with fewer professors.

The College of Social Sciences' biggest department, psychology, is short six professors, said Dean Harrell Rodgers. In 1983 about 2,000 students were enrolled in the college. The student-faculty ratio was 21-to-1 in 1983.

Rodgers said every semester 5,500 students take classes in the college, and 115 faculty members teach. "It is an awfully, terrible ratio," he said.

"We turn classes over to graduate students or hire outside people who usually have their Ph.D.s and work for the industry," said Rodgers. "Even if the students give a good evaluation to graduate students, they say that they would like to have a full professor."

The number of teaching assistants was 378 in the fall of 1983, but had increased to 1,011 last fall, according to statistics kept by the Office of Planning and Policy Analysis.

Dean John Bear of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics has been at the university for 30 years. He said the student-faculty ratio used to be smaller, but added that tenure-line faculty size, which includes some of the professors, associate and assistant professors, has not been increased much since then.

"Teaching is not fun anymore," Bear said. Every semester about 10,000 students take mathematics, 5,000 take biology and 5,000 take chemistry in the college. Students have particular difficulty getting into the labs, he said.

The College of Humanities, Fine Arts and Communication also has crowded classes in some of its departments. Sophomore English, sophomore and freshman Spanish, art, cultural heritage, logic and philosophy classes are among the most crowded ones, Lawrence Curry, associate dean of HFAC, said.

Sometimes the department gives students permission to take off-campus courses, especially English and Spanish, he said.

Curry said that to compensate for the scarcity of full professors, either teaching assistants or lecturers must teach more classes.

"We'd rather have permanent money to allow us to hire faculty, but that's not going to happen," Curry said.

Curry said every department in HFAC is looking at ways to manage teaching with fewer resources. Offering classes in larger sections or TV instruction may be options, he said.

"The university is not state supported. It is just assisted by the state," Curry said.

Both Bear and Rodgers said the quality of education will be in jeopardy if the state doesn't give more support. Bear said the only way to improve the situation is more money.

Bear said, on one hand, the Texas Legislature wants the university to improve the quality of the education by putting more tenure track people in charge. But, on the other hand, UH must do the opposite because of lack of money.

The catch-22 situation is not likely to change for the university. UH's $8.5 million budget cut will be split up in the budget biennium. UH will lose $2.6 million in 1994-95 and $5.9 million in 1995-96.

Student-faculty ratio also affects graduate students, who comprise one-third of the student population. David Judkins, director of graduate studies in the Department of English said the department doesn't accept more than 15 students for seminars and the number of courses is limited.

"(Students) can’t get the classes they want. They don’t move through the programs as quickly as they want," he said.

Judkins, who has been at UH for 22 years, said classes were less crowded 10 or 15 years ago. He said the department hires part-time unranked faculty or teaching assistants instead of ranked and full-time faculty.

On the other hand, President James Pickering said hiring part-time faculty from the community is advantageous for the students. He said the the university has extraordinary part-time faculty members, who have worked in the fields they teach.

"It’s a budget matter. I see no way that (the number of full-time faculty) is going to improve," said Glenn Aumann, senior vice president for Academic Affairs.

"You can at least hire a person who is who is very competent in the subject matter," he said.

Aumann also said the Houston community has enough expertise in law, architecture, business, technology, optometry, pharmacy and social work.

However, he said UH should have enough faculty members to provide counseling to students, set policies and help with recruitment and admission.

"Students are not being put in front of inexperienced teachers who are learning how to teach. They are facing more classes taught by professionals who are here part-time," Aumann said.

The student population will stay around 30,000, he added.

Other criteria used to determine the faculty resource ranking was taken from the percentage of full-time faculty with doctorates or other top degrees, the percentage of faculty with part-time status and the percentage of faculty with Ph.D.s.

 

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LOST FOR THE YEAR

SHOULDER INURY FORCES LAMAR SMITH OUT OF COLLEGE FOOTBALL FOREVER

by Adam King

Daily Cougar Staff

In addition to losing 34-10 to Texas A&M last Saturday, Houston took another major setback when running back Lamar Smith dislocated his left shoulder in the third quarter.

The prognosis: Smith has opted to have his shoulder surgically repaired and will be out the remainder of the season.

It was a blow the Cougars couldn’t have seen coming and one they can ill-afford.

Through the first five games, Smith accounted for 92 percent of the team’s rushing yardage and led the team in both receiving (29 catches) and scoring (five touchdowns).

This is the first time Smith has been injured in his career and the frustration has yet to fully set in.

"It’s my last year. I got snuffed my senior year of football," Smith said. "I’ll probably never be able to play college football again.

"Right now I’m taking it good, but this upcoming Saturday (against Southern Methodist) it’s going to hit me good."

In Smith’s stead, backfield mate TiAndre Sanders will be expected to pick up where Smith left off.

"When Lamar went down, the team went, ‘Oh no,’" Sanders said. "I need to show them I can do it. He’s been carrying a big load this year. It’s some big shoes to fill."

Sanders has shown he is a capable back. Through five games, he has rushed 12 times for 69 yards and has caught eight passes for 82 yards in Houston’s two-back set.

Senior Tommy Guy will replace Sanders at fullback. Senior Donald Moffett, who also plays slot receiver, and sophomore Bobby Rodriguez are the backups.

"TiAndre, Tommy and Donald, they can do the same job I can do," said Smith, a native of Fort Wayne, Ind. "I don’t think the team will lose one step."

Maybe not, but Smith has lost his senior season. His glory season.

After missing the first two games last year, Smith came back to rush for 845 yards and nine touchdowns and added 30 receptions for 315 yards and two TDs – a prelude to a stellar 1993.

And until Saturday’s injury, Smith was on pace to break those marks. He carried the ball 96 times for 417 yards and two touchdowns and caught 29 passes for 205 yards and three TDs.

The numbers look good on paper, but Smith would give them all up to do the one thing he has never done.

"I never got to play a bowl game," he said. "One of the most important things I didn’t get to accomplish was going to the Cotton Bowl."

Now all Smith can do is watch from the sidelines and hope his teammates can bring him the ring.

"Spiritually, I’ll be backing these guys," Smith said. "I’m still a part of this football team."

 

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STUDENT TAKES GRIEVANCE TO METRO

by Charlotte Pennye

News Reporter

Evening classes are a necessity for some UH students, but having to depend on public transportation to get home may be a problem.

Lula Rhodes, a senior elementary education major, boarded a city bus near campus and rode to her regular drop off point in the UT Medical Center to transfer to another bus. But instead of getting off at her usual stop, she was asked to vacate the bus in unfamiliar territory.

"I usually get off in the medical center and then take the next bus that comes, just to get out of the area," Rhodes said.

But on the night of Sept. 21 the driver of the transfer bus refused to drop her off at the corner she specified. "He kept driving and we ended up in this area I did not recognize. He then told me I would have to get off because he had to take the bus to the garage," she said.

"I asked him to take me back to where he picked me up, but he told me I could not use my transfer to go back. He told me I would have to pay again, so I asked him to call his supervisor," Rhodes said.

When the supervisor arrived Rhodes got off the bus and spoke with him about the misunderstanding, until she spotted another bus going in her direction.

"I told him I did not have anymore time to waste, so I asked him to hold the bus for me.

"I got off the bus one block from my house and realized that the supervisor and a policeman had followed the bus. We talked about the incident again," she said.

Rhodes said the policeman volunteered to take her home, but asked for her license. "He put me in the back and I felt like I was locked up in a cage or a hot steaming pot. I decided to be calm and asked him to crack the door or window. He was very courteous, but it still should not have happened," she said.

Rhodes made arrangements and was permitted to speak about her grievances at the Metro Board meeting on Sept. 29.

"I was only allowed two or three minutes, so I did not get a chance to mention some of my other suggestions," she said.

Jesse Broussard, director of transportation for Metro, said, "When citizens sign up to speak at the meetings, they sign up for three minutes.

"As far as our policy for after-dark trips, anyone is let off at any corner after leaving the downtown area," he said.

Broussard added that he has spoken to the supervisor and the driver to educate them about the policy, so this type of thing will not be repeated.

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