SUPERCHUNK

Band's new disc stands out

by Tom Turner

Daily Cougar Staff

A refreshing array of "pop-punk melodies" can be heard just beyond the mainstream musical whirlpool. Of all places it's rising out of Chapel Hill, N.C. What we're talking about here is Superchunk. Once again, the group is making big waves with its latest release on Touch and Go/Merge Records, <I>Foolish<P>.

The music of Superchunk has been described as "melodic punk" to "exhilarating guitar-propelled power pop." Well, whatever catch phrases one wants to slap on this band, it has a really great sound. No need for big, drawn out descriptions. Superchunk is what a good portion of the music industry has been lacking for quite some time.

<I>Foolish<P>, the latest release for the group, is a collection of 12 tracks, which range from the quiet and melancholy to guitar driven, pop-punk songs. A few of the standout tracks on this release include "Water Wings," "Driveway to Driveway," "Kicked In" and "Why Do You Have to Put A Date On Everything."

Superchunk is led by singer/guitarist Mac McCaughn, whose boyish sounding voice adds an interesting twist to the overall sound of the group. Laura Ballance on bass, Jim Wilbur on guitar and Jon Wurster on drums fill out the rest of Superchunk.

Superchunk was founded over four years ago by Ballance and McCaughn in Chapel Hill. The group began releasing albums under its self-owned label, Merge Records. This was done due to the "sense of integrity and genuine interest in the indie scene" the two founders of the band have. McCaughn went on to say that "it's important for there to be an infrastructure like indie music where people can put out records without having a lot of money."

<I>Foolish<P> is only the latest of a stream of numerous albums for Superchunk. Some of the larger releases for the band include <I>On The Mouth<P>, <I>Hit Self-Destruct<P>, <I>No Pocky for Kitty<P> and the first major release for the group, the simply titled <I>Superchunk<P>.

In total, the group has put together over 20 LP's, EP's, 7's and various other recordings. Not too shabby of an accomplishment, especially since the band started releasing recordings in 1989.

Superchunk has even provided music for a British Knights shoe commercial. McCaughn commented that, "it helped pay for our new van so I don't feel like we whored ourselves too badly." He went on to say that the members got free sneakers for the deal as well.

Superchunk's latest release is without a doubt a powerful wave that will pass pleasantly over the ears of the masses. So, go pick up some 'Chunk and see for yourself what it really sounds like.

For more information on Superchunk contact: Superchunk at P.O. Box 1235; Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514.

 

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CUBAN TRIP MAY MEAN JAIL

by Ericka Schiche

Daily Cougar Staff

When 200 U.S. citizens returned from Cuba Friday, they faced the prospect of a government-imposed incarceration sentences of 10 years in jail and $250,000 in fines.

Those who participated in an educational excursion on the economically depressed island–that represents one of the last vestiges of communism–defied the circa 1970 "Trading With the Enemy Act," which outlaws the kind of civil disobedience for which the group, representing the San Francisco-based Freedom to Travel Campaign, may be held guilty.

Many of those who made the trip returned to the United States by first making a stop at the Houston Intercontinental Airport.

UH Physics Professor George Reiter was among those who returned from the trip to the nation, which is governed by Fidel Castro.

"We actually came through yesterday (last Thursday). We didn't have any problem at all. In fact, they didn't even look at our passports–we just walked through.

"Why they would give grief to the young people, I just don't understand that, unless they want to intimidate the most intimidatable people," Reiter said.

"Actually, as I understand it, it's not the travel which is illegal, it's the spending money in Cuba which is illegal," Reiter said.

About two weeks ago, the U.S. Treasury Department froze the Freedom to Travel Campaign's Wells Fargo bank account, which contains $43,000. The money was supposed to be allocated for travel expenditures. In retort, FTC officials filed a civil lawsuit, claiming the restrictions constitute an unfair infringement on Constitutional rights.

Those who participated in the trip reside in 20 states and range in age from seven to 90 years old. In October 1993, 60 members of a 175-member delegation had their passports confiscated upon returning to the United States. The confiscated passports were eventually returned to the owners.

Although Congress passed a resolution last March that gave credence to the concept of good will educational exchanges between U.S. citizens and Cuban citizens, the travel restrictions imposed in 1970 have not been rendered null and void by the Clinton administration.

The Congress' joint resolution affirms the travelers' idea that they should be permitted to travel to Cuba since their activities fall under the banner of informational, educational, religious, cultural or humanitarian purposes.

Rep. Don Edwards, D-Calif., said, in response to the Clinton administration's stance: "The best way to expedite the fall of totalitarianism in Cuba is to encourage the flow of information, the exchange of ideas and the development of friendships between ordinary Americans and Cubans."

Medea Benjamin, spokesperson for the Freedom to Travel Campaign, said, "By taking this trip, we wanted to point out inconsistencies in U.S. policy and we wanted to strengthen those within the government who want to see the policy changed."

Although she neglected to mention the recently-imposed restrictions that forbid Americans from taking commercial flights to Haiti, she noted that two Communist nations are among those to which Americans are forbidden to visit.

"Cuba and North Korea are the only places we are not allowed to travel because of the 'Trading With the Enemy Act' ... you can tell by the date of the act, 1917, that this is a very outdated policy."

The 1992 Cuban Democracy Act, supported by President Bill Clinton, also supports travel restrictions.

The travel restrictions placed as part of economic sanctions the Clinton administration intends to level at Haiti were instituted in an effort to restore deposed, democratically-elected Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. The militaristic regime that now controls Port-au-Prince has heretofore resisted U.S. efforts to re-install Aristide. However, the situation in Haiti does not compare to that of Cuba, which has for decades been considered one of the United States' chief rivals in the Western Hemisphere.

"We still can't even travel to Cuba for educational purposes," said Benjamin.

She said, "We believe that as U.S. citizens, we should have the right to go wherever we want. We see, in the case of Cuba, hundreds of thousands of Canadian citizens, Mexican citizens, Europeans– people from all over the world go to Cuba as a matter of prestige to spend their holidays and that we are the only people in the world that are not allowed go there. It's 90 miles off of our shores, it's one of our closest neighbors. We went, but we went challenging the government's restrictions."

At a press conference held in the Mickey Leland terminal of the airport, Benjamin expressed dismay at not being able to ascertain what steps the government will take in enforcing the act.

"We went, but we're not sure what the government will be doing now. Well, we did what we accomplished, but the government can put us in jail for ten years and fine us $250,000 fines because of going to Cuba. We don't expect it to happen, but we didn't expect that kids on our trip would be hassled, and have their goods confiscated from them," she said. "We did not expect that people would have their t-shirts taken off them or asked to take them off of their bodies, especially a 13-year-old. We did not expect that people would have educational materials taken away from them, which they did," Benjamin said.

Benjamin said she was miffed by the incidence of non-checked bags, especially considering what had happened prior to this latest trip. She said, "There's been such a strange thing going on here but we can't figure it out. The first bunch of us didn't even have our bags opened. Nothing was checked."

At least 10 returning travelers entered the press conference for the duration of the press conference, but many others waited in the area where customs agents and sniffing dogs generally scrutinize and scent out, respectively, suspect luggage and packages.

"I would go through a lot worse to go to Cuba again," said 13-year-old Raya Duenas in response to being searched by U.S. Customs and having baskets from Cuba–that she carried with her–taken away.

Reiter and his wife, Debbie Shasto, hoisted a makeshift placard–fashioned out of loose boards–that contained the names of all the people that went to Cuba. As each person passed through, they would check off their names as they passed through the customs area. Emblazoned on their sign were the words, "Welcome Back From Cuba."

In a letter–dated June 16, 1994–written by Chairperson of the House Armed Services Committee Ron Dellums, D-Calif., to Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen, Dellums expressed disappointment with the actions of the Department of Treasury.

Dellums wrote, "I do not understand why Treasury, at this time when there are so many urgent tasks for federal employees to perform, should enforce this particular set of laws against a country with which we have not been, nor is engaged in war. I respectfully ask that you consider rescinding this action while we prepare the way to normalize relations with one of our closest neighbors."

During the trip to Cuba, members of the group visited schools and day-care centers, delivered medicine to needy hospitals, played baseball with Cuban athletes and politicians and attended an outdoor "Friendship Concert."

 

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LOW ENROLLMENT MAY CAUSE UH FINANCIAL PAIN

by Tanya Eiserer

Daily Cougar Staff

Administration officials project a further decline in enrollment in the 1994-'95 school year.

Mary Rubright, the executive director of planning and budget, projects enrollment at 31,870 for the next academic year.

"We are basing our revenue budget on 31,870 and our expenditure budget on 31,300," said Rubright.

Although enrollment has declined steadily since 1991, when enrollment was at its peak, Sharon Richardson, the associate vice president for academic affairs, said enrollments need to be viewed historically.

"We have been at about the same enrollment level for fifteen years. We have a fairly stable enrollment level," said Richardson.

Last year's enrollment was 32,129–a decrease of 259 students.

"Every year, there's been a trend towards decreasing enrollment. We haven't really stayed consistent at all. I don't know what the deal is, but we need to recognize it and stop the trend," said Angie Milner, president of the Students' Association.

Milner also speculated that this year's projected decrease could be attributed to the new Voice Information Processing system that allows students to automatically determine if their classes are available.

"If their classes are not available, they still have time to register and go to (Houston Community College) or San Jacinto Community College. We are asking the questions, but until we get some kind of statistics, we will not know the answers," said Milner.

Enrollment figures decreased from 33,607 in 1991 to 33,025 in 1992. Enrollments have shown a steady decline by 300 to 900 students per academic year since 1991.

Richardson also said UH's enrollments have been greatly affected by Houston's economic situation, especially since many students are older, part-time students.

Statewide, UH ranks third in enrollment behind the University of Texas and Texas A&M University. The University of North Texas ranks a close fourth with 28,000 to 30,000 students enrolled, said Milner.

"Enrollment at senior institutions statewide has been declining. Enrollment at community colleges has been increasing. Costs are important. Also, where people live in relation to the university (is significant). Still, if you look at our average enrollments over the last fifteen years, we are above that average," said Richardson.

With the legislative biennium fast approaching, enrollment figures will become a major factor in UH's state funding.

"This is the base year for formula funding. Since enrollments are down, it is disconcerting for us," said Rubright.

The state tracks a base period, then determines the university's funding appropriation on that base, said Richardson.

"Many of the formulas that affect us are enrollment driven. We are expecting a smaller base than in the last base period, so we expect our state funding to be affected by that," she said.

Richardson said the level of UH's funding losses will depend on the enrollment level of the 36 other state universities in Texas.

Rodger Peters, chairman of the Student Fees Advisory Committee, said enrollment has decreased due to myriad factors.

"Student fees have gone up. Community colleges are cheaper now. We are probably going to lose more students to community colleges because of the prices. Still, UH has the cheapest student service fees," Peters said.

Although projected enrollment indicates a further decline, Peters said student services will not be adversely impacted.

"We estimate our budget on 30,500 students this year. In the past, we estimated our budget on 31,500 students," said Peters.

 

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UH LIBRARY LAGGING NATIONALLY

by Tiffany Vaughner

Daily Cougar Staff

UH's M.D. Anderson Library ranked 101st out of 108 in a listing compiled by the Association of Research Libraries in the May 25 edition of <I>The Chronicle of Higher Education<P>.

The ARL ranked member universities in the United States and Canada for the period from 1992 to 1993. The criteria for ranking was predicated on five factors: Total volumes in library, volumes added (during previous fiscal year), current serials, permanent staff (professional, non-professional workers and student workers) and total expenditures.

The ARL rankings do not measure the quality of library services, collections or the success of the member libraries in meeting the needs of their particular campus community.

Robin Downes, director of M.D. Anderson Library, said the UH administration and the Students' Association entered into an agreement during the 1992-1993 school year to add a library fee to the student service fees.

He said the three-year agreement–now in its second year–will generate just over $1 million in extra funds. The UH administration has, in turn, agreed to increase the library budget to $1.5 million. The money will be allocated primarily for the acquisition of new books and journals.

Faculty Senate President Ernst Leiss, called the controversy over library funding a, "finite pot."

"If you put (for example) $3 million into the library, that same $3 million will have to come from somewhere, and there is still only one big pot," Leiss said.

He said administration, faculty and students should realize that one area or department cannot be allowed to suffer to save another. Leiss said the new fee would improve the condition of the library, but warned there might never be enough money because of the reality of having a scarcity of funds and many places to spend them.

Leiss said to some extent, the rankings are superficial. He said comparing university libraries like Texas A&M to UH was like comparing apples to oranges. He said students and faculty at TAMU would either have to accept the unavailability of a certain book or journal or wait for an inter-library transfer.

Leiss said students and faculty at UH have more choices if a particular selection can not be found in the library. He said students could use another library such as Rice University's or any of the Houston Public Library branches.

Don Tolliver, dean of libraries and media services at Ohio's Kent State University, said even though his library was ranked 102nd, he felt the rankings were a "gross indicator" of the overall service of many research libraries.

"I don't think the university (Kent) is really concerned with the rankings because, as I see it, they measure quantity, not quality. I feel this (way of thinking) is true of most universities," Tolliver said.

He admitted, six to eight years ago Kent was ranked at the bottom of the list. He said about $1 million in state support and increased tuition fees helped raise Kent to its present ranking. Tolliver added that even though the increase in Kent's operating budget was a key factor in the change, the most significant factor was the decision of Kent's administration and faculty to make improvement of the library a priority.

Three universities from Texas made the list. Rice University ranked 103rd, Texas A&M University ranked 45th and The University of Texas ranked eighth.

Rice University Librarian Beth Shapiro concurred with Tolliver's sentiments about the ARL rankings not serving as an indicator of quality. She said even though it was, "important and prestigious," to belong to the ARL, it was more important to be able to meet the immediate needs of the students and faculty.

TAMU's dean of libraries, Fred M. Heath, said the ARL rankings are a "reliable indicator of the total investment in the library sector of the university, and the Evans library is consistently striving to be a better resource for the campus community. As we improve, it is reasonable to expect that our overall budget will improve, and therefore, our ranking."

 

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UH LIBRARY LAGGING NATIONALLY

by Tiffany Vaughner

Daily Cougar Staff

UH's M.D. Anderson Library ranked 101st out of 108 in a listing compiled by the Association of Research Libraries in the May 25 edition of <I>The Chronicle of Higher Education<P>.

The ARL ranked member universities in the United States and Canada for the period from 1992 to 1993. The criteria for ranking was predicated on five factors: Total volumes in library, volumes added (during previous fiscal year), current serials, permanent staff (professional, non-professional workers and student workers) and total expenditures.

The ARL rankings do not measure the quality of library services, collections or the success of the member libraries in meeting the needs of their particular campus community.

Robin Downes, director of M.D. Anderson Library, said the UH administration and the Students' Association entered into an agreement during the 1992-1993 school year to add a library fee to the student service fees.

He said the three-year agreement–now in its second year–will generate just over $1 million in extra funds. The UH administration has, in turn, agreed to increase the library budget to $1.5 million. The money will be allocated primarily for the acquisition of new books and journals.

Faculty Senate President Ernst Leiss, called the controversy over library funding a, "finite pot."

"If you put (for example) $3 million into the library, that same $3 million will have to come from somewhere, and there is still only one big pot," Leiss said.

He said administration, faculty and students should realize that one area or department cannot be allowed to suffer to save another. Leiss said the new fee would improve the condition of the library, but warned there might never be enough money because of the reality of having a scarcity of funds and many places to spend them.

Leiss said to some extent, the rankings are superficial. He said comparing university libraries like Texas A&M to UH was like comparing apples to oranges. He said students and faculty at TAMU would either have to accept the unavailability of a certain book or journal or wait for an inter-library transfer.

Leiss said students and faculty at UH have more choices if a particular selection can not be found in the library. He said students could use another library such as Rice University's or any of the Houston Public Library branches.

Don Tolliver, dean of libraries and media services at Ohio's Kent State University, said even though his library was ranked 102nd, he felt the rankings were a "gross indicator" of the overall service of many research libraries.

"I don't think the university (Kent) is really concerned with the rankings because, as I see it, they measure quantity, not quality. I feel this (way of thinking) is true of most universities," Tolliver said.

He admitted, six to eight years ago Kent was ranked at the bottom of the list. He said about $1 million in state support and increased tuition fees helped raise Kent to its present ranking. Tolliver added that even though the increase in Kent's operating budget was a key factor in the change, the most significant factor was the decision of Kent's administration and faculty to make improvement of the library a priority.

Three universities from Texas made the list. Rice University ranked 103rd, Texas A&M University ranked 45th and The University of Texas ranked eighth.

Rice University Librarian Beth Shapiro concurred with Tolliver's sentiments about the ARL rankings not serving as an indicator of quality. She said even though it was, "important and prestigious," to belong to the ARL, it was more important to be able to meet the immediate needs of the students and faculty.

TAMU's dean of libraries, Fred M. Heath, said the ARL rankings are a "reliable indicator of the total investment in the library sector of the university, and the Evans library is consistently striving to be a better resource for the campus community. As we improve, it is reasonable to expect that our overall budget will improve, and therefore, our ranking."

 

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UH WELL-REPRESENTED IN '94 USOF

by Olivia Clark

Contributing Writer

Five female University of Houston athletes are taking part in the U.S. Olympic Festival, which started on July 1 and ends July 10 in St. Louis, Mo.

The USOF, which is held every year, consists of 37 events over 10 days.

The top athletes from each sport are invited to attend the Festival and compete for either the North, South, East or West division.

An estimated 200,000 people watched the opening ceremony Friday night which was held under the Gateway Arch, and more than 500,000 spectators are anticipated for the 10 day event.

The Cougars are lead by track and field standout Dawn Burrell. She will compete in the 400-meter dash at the new $6.5 million track facility at Southern Illinois University.

Burrell, a two-time All-American who recently finished seventh at the USA/Mobil Outdoor Championships, is from Philadelphia, Pa. and the sister of former Cougar and Olympic gold-medal winner Leroy Burrell. She will compete this week for the East.

In the pool, Donnelle DuBois and Suzanne Wingenter compete in the springboard diving and water polo events respectively.

DuBois, an Honorable Mention All-American, from San Jose, Calif., competed in the 1-meter event Saturday, making it to the quarterfinal round, but failing to make the semifinals.

DuBois will represent the West in the 3-meter event which is being held today.

Wingenter, from San Antonio, is a sophomore on the swim team. She plays water polo in her spare time and was a last-minute addition to the squad. Wingenter competes this week for the South.

Pat Luckey, a sophomore from San Marcos and a member of the basketball team, was also selected to compete in the festival.

In her first game she scored five points for the South, although they lost to the West 87-84.

As a freshman, Luckey led the team in scoring with 19 points per game and rebounding with 8.7 boards a game during the 1993-'94 season.

She was also named USA Today Honorable Mention Freshman of the Year.

Lilly Denoon, a member of the Cougar volleyball team competes this week for the South.

Denoon, who earned first team All-Southwest Conference honors this season was selected for the '93 Festival, but withdrew prior to the event to rest her shoulder.

More than $2.4 million in tickets have been purchased for this year's Festival, and it is expected to be the most successful to date.

 

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NO MORE MIRACLES FOR THE U.S. SOCCER TEAM AFTER BRAZIL PULLS OUT CLOSE WIN

by Chad V. GoGan

Contributing Writer

There are some who say that Brazil is the best soccer team in the world. The score of yesterday's game against the U.S. won't change that. Brazil won, 1-0.

It was a matter of experience and skill; qualities the Brazilians have <I>en masse<P>.

It did appear for a short time that the Americans might pull off the huge upset. In the first half, Brazil missed many opportunities to score and the U.S. held on to go into halftime tied 0-0.

The U.S. team received what appeared to be a major break when in the 45th minute of play Brazil defender Leonardo was given a red card for throwing an elbow at U.S. midfielder Tab Ramos.

Even when playing one man down, Brazil's skill proved too much for the U.S. In the 74th minute, Bebeto scored the winning goal.

So the dream of a '94 World Cup championship died in Palo Alto, Calif. before a World Cup attendance record of more than 86,000 people. But to give credit where credit is due, the U.S. dream lived longer than it was supposed to.

The U.S. finished with an overall World Cup record of 1-2-1 after failing in its attempt to win in the second round for the first time in team history.

Brazil now goes on to play the Netherlands in Dallas on Saturday. The Netherlands capitalized on two mistakes to beat Ireland 2-0 on Monday in Orlando, Fla.

The first upset of the second round occurred Sunday in Pasadena, Calif. Romania defeated Argentina, playing without Diego Maradona, 3-2.

Romania now plays Sweden Sunday in Stanford, Calif. Sweden advances after defeating Saudi Arabia 3-1 in Dallas this past Sunday.

In other action, Germany defeated Belgium 3-2 and will play the winner of today's Mexico-Bulgaria match Sunday. Spain beat Switzerland 3-0 in Washington, and now awaits the winner of today's other game, Nigeria-Italy.

The start of the second round was overshadowed by two shocking events. Maradona, Argentina's oft-troubled superstar, was withdrawn from the rest of the tournament by his own team for testing positive to five different forms of the banned drug ephedrine.

It wasn't only soccer fans who were stunned with the murder of Andres Escobar. Escobar was the Colombian defender who accidentally scored in his own goal during the 2-1 loss to the U.S., the loss that knocked Colombia out of the World Cup.

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BAYLOR UNDER FBI PROBE

Term-paper scandal could mean charges

The FBI has subpoenaed documents obtained by the Southwest Conference during its investigation into the Baylor men's basketball team, according to an article published in the Houston Chronicle Saturday, July 2.

Baylor is being investigated by the SWC for supplying Jerome Lambert with a term paper while he was at an Arkansas junior college.

Lambert has disclosed that he told SWC investigators that coach Troy Drummond, then an assistant coach at Westark Community College, faxed him the paper last spring. They both came to Baylor the next semester.

The FBI, according to the Chronicle story, sought the SWC documents to decide if federal wire fraud statutes had been violated.

Lambert originally planned to enter last Wednesday's NBA draft. He has said he will transfer from Baylor, but hasn't taken steps to do so yet. Head coach Darrel Johnson turned down a head-coaching job in the CBA to stay at Baylor.

Drummond resigned April 17, the day after Lambert made the allegations public.

Cotton Bowl site up in air

After much debate, the question of where the Mobil Cotton Bowl will be played starting in 1996 has been answered -- or has it?

The Cotton Bowl Athletic Association voted last Tuesday to keep the traditional game at the Cotton Bowl stadium at Fair Park, inside the city of Dallas. This came after pressure was applied from the city government.

But Wednesday, John Crawford, president of the CBAA, said there is a chance it could still be moved. Crawford said the decision would depend on the new bowl coalition.

If the new coalition, called the Tier I bowl lineup, is approved this summer and the Conference Commissioners Association desires the game to be played in Texas Stadium in Irving, the venue will surely change.

Crawford indicated over the weekend that if making the Cotton Bowl a Tier I game would have to include moving the game to suburban Irving, then the move would certainly take place.

The Tier I proposal is the latest attempt to bring the top two football teams together to decide a national champion.

The NCAA Presidents Commission announced last week that it will no longer study the possibility of a Division I-A playoff.

The new system would give the Tier I games the prime-time slots Dec. 31-Jan. 2. The matchups would start New Year's Eve with Nos. 4 and 6, followed by Nos. 3 and 5 on New Year's day and Nos. 1 and 2 on Jan. 2.

Meanwhile, the battle for the Mobil Cotton Bowl rages on. The city of Dallas has offered $4 million in improvements to the stadium and another $4 million to supply free food, transportation, lodging and other bonuses.

In response, Jerry Jones, owner of the Dallas Cowboys, is proposing to put a retractable roof on Texas Stadium. The roof would solve the problem of the cold weather the Cotton Bowl has usually been played in.

New hoops coach at A&M

Texas A&M has hired Candi Harvey, formerly head coach at Tulane, to head their women's basketball program. She replaces Lynn Hickey, who was promoted to No. 2 administrator in the A&M athletic department.

The 36-year-old Harvey finished with an unimpressive 46-68 record in her four seasons at Tulane. Yet she went from 6-22 her first season to a school-record 17-14 in '93-'94.

Tulane finished fourth in the National Women's Invitational Tournament last season.

Harvey's background in women's basketball goes further back than the pitfalls of the Tulane program. She spent six years as an assistant coach at Stephen F. Austin.

She made the first addition to her staff by hiring Kristy Sims, another former SFA assistant coach and an assistant coach under Harvey at Tulane.

-- William German

and Daniel Scholl

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