CLINTON CHALLENGES REPUBLICANS IN STATE OF THE UNION ADDRESS

by James V. Geluso

Daily Cougar Staff

President Clinton's State of the Union address, delivered to a joint session of Congress Tuesday, was, if anything, a speech of dualities.

Clinton's 80-minute speech, meant to outline his agenda for the coming year, shifted precariously between a call for a deep, spiritual commitment from America – what he called a "New Covenant" – and a simple wish list of legislation to be passed or protected in the coming year.

In a scene reminiscent of Hillary Clinton's "Politics of Virtue" theme from 1993, the president appealed to individuals – business leaders, parents and religious leaders in particular – to work at the local level. Segueing from repeated references to natural disasters, he called for a national campaign against teen pregnancy.

At the center of his speech was sacred cows. He reaffirmed his commitment to protect Social Security and Medicare, the pet programs of the politically powerful elderly lobby, from any cuts that might have to come as deficit-reducing measures.

He also staked out his own, personal sacred cows – the Brady Bill, the assault-weapons ban and the national service program – and made it clear that any attempt to repeal these laws would be fought tooth-and-nail. Clinton stopped short of using the word "veto," but every member of Congress knew what he meant.

Facing an opposition Congress with a substantial freshman class and a 40-year grudge, Clinton invoked bipartisanship at every opportunity. He also denigrated politicians in general at least three times, each time appealing to the "middle class" or "ordinary Americans."

Wandering from topic to topic, Clinton managed to return several times to the middle-class theme. He spoke of his Middle Class Bill of Rights, a program of tax cuts and incentives designed to help the working family. Numerous references were made to the economy, focusing on both improvement and the need for more aid to working families.

Clinton brought up several issues in his speech, including:

•Lobbyists. The president lamented the reform bill killed in Congress last year, and asked Congress to simply stop taking perks from lobbyists, saying, "there doesn't have to be a law for everything." Many freshmen promised lobby reform in their campaigns, but the same can be said for the last Congress, and the one before that.

•The balanced budget amendment. Clinton took no position on the proposed amendment, but insisted that proponents "have to be straight with the American people" by listing specific cuts. (The House passed the amendment on Thursday with no such list.)

•Welfare. Clinton said he supports reform, but condemned some of the punitive measures suggested by House Speaker Newt Gingrich and others. "We shouldn't cut people off just because they're poor, they're young or even because they're unmarried," he said. "I still don't think we can, in good conscience, punish poor children for the mistakes of their parents."

•Crime. Clinton cited the 1993 crime bill as one of his achievements, listing several key provisions, including the controversial "three-strikes-and-you're-out" measure. However, he failed to mention any legislation for the coming year.

•Tax and spending cuts. The president called for more tax cuts, but insisted that they be paid for by spending cuts, invoking the specter of the deficit. He said that in his upcoming budget, "spending cuts will more than double the tax cuts," without touching Social Security or Medicare. But, like the Republicans, he failed to offer any specific cuts beyond the generalized "federal bureaucracy."

•Wages and health care. Clinton called for an increase in the minimum wage, expressing a desire to "make the minimum wage a living wage." He also asked for "meaningful insurance reform" to curb high premiums and to protect workers from losing their insurance if they change jobs.

•Foreign policy and defense. Clinton played up his foreign-policy successes, including Rwanda, Kuwait and Haiti. He also joined Republicans in supporting an increase in the defense budget.

Despite numerous concessions, it is unlikely that this address will have any effect on the agenda of congressional Republicans. Clinton may promise tax cuts in his budget, but the Republicans are already preparing to throw Clinton's proposal out in favor of their own.

But Clinton also indicated that the Republicans cannot just repeal programs at will, and promised to fight any attempts to remove his victories of the past two years. Facing a hostile Congress, it was really all he could do.

 

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OVER-ALLOCATION OF WORK-STUDY FUNDS NOT UNUSUAL, OFFICIALS SAY

by Jennifer Smith

Daily Cougar Staff

The Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid promises more than twice the funds it has available for work-study grants, Director Rob Sheridan said.

About $3 million was awarded to recipients of work-study grants this year, and there was only $1.2 million granted for that purpose to the university, he said.

"They want to avoid having money left over," said David Small, assistant vice president for Student Services. "I didn't know the ratio was that high."

Scholarships and Financial Aid habitually does this, said Sheridan, in order to allow for those students who don't use or underutilize their grants.

Elwyn Lee, vice president for Student Affairs, added, "I see nothing at all odd about that."

He said this overgranting of money could be likened to the admissions process, wherein many more applicants are accepted than there are actually spaces available.

UH economics Professor Michael J. Palumbo said, "(This) is probably fairly standard. I don't think that people think there is anything unethical in this.

"They are using statistics to help them, protecting against having money left over," he added.

Palumbo also compared the situation to the admissions situation, adding, "Standard operating procedure is to let them in and say we'll make room for you.

"The issue is whether (Scholarships and Financial Aid) would (make room)," he said.

Of the 1,087 students who were granted work-study this year, 689 actually worked, Sheridan said.

Any number of factors could influence a student's decision to take another job, Sheridan added, citing better-paying off-campus jobs as a major factor.

When asked what would happen if every student who was promised a work-study grant took advantage of it, Sheridan said,"Then we would have a problem."

Pressed further, Sheridan said that in the case of an unprecedented high acceptance or utilization rate, either institutional employment would have to be found for those extra students, or "work study grants would have to be lowered across the board."

"However, we don't anticipate this happening," he said.

Asked if there was ever any money left over, Sheridan said, "The university gets an administrative allowance based on actual amounts given to students. The university has to decide at the end of the year where to take out the money, so if there was $32,000 left after the end of the year, the university would probably absorb it.

"If there was actually anything left after money for administrative allotment is taken out, say we had $150,000 left over, we would fund summer work-studies. It's been a long time since we've had the money for summer work-studies," he added.

 

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TRUEBA PROPOSES

TASK FORCES TO HIKE ENROLLMENT

by Kevin Patton

Daily Cougar Staff

Coming on the heels of two years of declining enrollment and semester credit hours figures, and amid the current legislative biennium, Henry Trueba, UH provost and senior vice president for Academic Affairs, has proposed four new task forces expected to bolster academics and student retention.

The proposed task forces will begin meeting this semester and have on their agendas the creation of three new positions in the provost's office, two distinguished chairs, four centers of specialized study and a task force of students responsible for assessing the quality of student services.

The task force responsible for reviewing recruitment, admission and retention will create the following administrative positions: executive director of the Office of Recruitment, Admission and Retention (ORAR); the vice provost for Research and Graduate Studies; and the vice provost for Undergraduate Studies, currently the position of associate vice president for Academic Affairs, now held by Shirley Ezell.

A national search to fill the position of executive director of ORAR will be overseen by the task force by John Butler, professor of geosciences, who will be chairman, with Sept. 1 as the anticipated completion date.

The search committee for the position of vice provost for Research and Graduate Studies will begin viewing applications Feb. 15 with Professor James Gibson acting as chairman.

Another task force will create two temporary distinguished chairs for associate and full professors with five-year durations and possible renewals.

The chairmanships will provide $5,000 and $10,000 above salary for the professor chosen to fill the position; the resources are to be used for "development, research, improvement of services and instruction, student work, research assistants and equipment," Trueba said in a memo to members of the task force.

"I was recently informed by President Pickering that there are, from a number of sources, some funds (including some recurring funds from an endowment) that I can use to partially support several new initiatives," Trueba said in the same memo.

The other two initiatives, focusing on students and creating centers for specialized studies, are equally as bold.

The four centers scheduled to be developed with the same money Trueba referred to will be the Center for Immigration Studies, to involve the colleges of Social Sciences, Education and Law; the Centro de Estudios Mexicanos, involving the colleges of Humanities, Social Sciences, Education, Law and Business; the Center for Asian American Studies, involving the colleges of Social Sciences, Humanities, Education and Hotel/Restaurant Management; and the Energy Center, involving the colleges of Engineering and Business.

Trueba hopes the four centers will aid in keeping students and attracting new ones.

"If you don't have good labs, buildings, etc. – hell, why would (students) want to be here," he said.

The final task force will allow student leaders to evaluate student services and their effectiveness.

"We want to create the mechanism whereby students can help each other," Trueba said.

The task force includes students, faculty, staff and even a member of the UH Police Department.

Although plans for this task force are still in the planning stage, its mission is to "try to accomplish tasks that can be followed up on," Trueba said.

 

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REYES FIGHTS FOR MINORITY REPRESENTATION

by�Bobby Summers

Daily Cougar Staff

 

Houston City Councilman Ben Reyes reaffirmed his long-standing commitment to protect the interests of Hispanics and other ethnic minorities in Houston.

Reyes covered a variety of issues during a press conference held in a UH journalism class Thursday, but highlighted a problem regarding minority representation on the board of a local museum, along with past and present problems with UH's commitment to serve the needs of local minority communities.

Reyes also announced he is adding his support to the Clinton administration's efforts to persuade Congress to provide loan guarantees to Mexico. Reyes said the recent downturn in the value of the peso has the potential to cause a huge economic loss for Houston businesses.

A 14-year veteran of City Council, Reyes has been an activist and a politician for many years. In 1972, from the Denver Harbor area of East Houston, he was elected as a state representative. At that time, Reyes was the youngest person ever elected to the state Legislature.

After 10 years in the Legislature, Reyes was elected to the Houston City Council.

Reyes' long run on City Council will come to an end this year as a result of term limits. Reyes, and others on the council, slipped through a loophole in the law just before the election two years ago and were able to get their names on the ballot by submitting petitions. The loophole in the election law has since been closed.

Although Reyes will be looking for other employment at the end of 1995, it appears the impending change has not dampened his determination to stand up for the rights of ethnic minorities.

Reyes opened his news conference with an explanation of his recent refusal to go along with a proposed plan to give community development funds to a Houston museum.

"I held up a quarter of a million dollars yesterday from the Museum of Fine Arts," Reyes said. "The museum has no minorities on their board. About four years ago, they came to us and said, 'Give us two acres of land so we can build a parking garage so we can park our staff.' " According to Reyes, the land was worth about $5 million.

"We gave it to them, but we said they had to diversify their board," Reyes said. "What they did was put a couple of token minorities on there.

"The irony in this is that now they have come back and have asked for money. The money that they want is community-development funds. That's poor people's money, money that is dedicated to the minority community."

Reyes said he acted to hold up the money for the museum in order to send the museum board a strong message.

"This museum board, it's ridiculous," Reyes said. "It's 1995

in Houston, Texas, and they have no minorities on their board. It's almost outrageous."

Reyes clearly is proud of his Houston heritage. He still lives in the same Denver Harbor neighborhood where he grew up, a neighborhood that also produced black activist and state and U.S. congressman Mickey Leland.

"I grew up in the same neighborhood as Mickey Leland," Reyes said. "Mickey and I grew up together, went to school together and he was elected to the state Legislature at the same time as I was. Our families are very close."

Over the years, Reyes and Leland were involved in many protests on behalf of the minority community, including a visit to UH in 1975 to protest the results of

UH's 10-year "Mission Self Study." Part of that self-study produced the first designation of the UH central campus as a "flagship" campus.

Reyes and Leland, both state representatives at the time, were concerned that a proposed 30,000- student enrollment ceiling and possible cuts in the Latin American and Black Studies programs would be detrimental to Hispanic and black students. The two legislators questioned whether UH was serving the needs of the Hispanic and black communities.

"We were fighting the idea of the 'flagship' concept," Reyes said. "Along with the 'flagship' concept, they wanted to make cuts in other areas. We objected to that."

In the ensuing 20 years, Reyes said he thinks UH has made some progress in serving the minority communities.

"I think we have made some strides," Reyes said. "But we still have a long ways to go. Mickey and I fought many fights here and at TSU over the years. I guess you could say we had some impact.

"Are we satisfied? No, I'm not satisfied."

UH Professor Tatcho Mindiola, director of Mexican-American Studies, said he agrees with some of Reyes' views, but sees the university's progress in a slightly different light.

"The university is making a tremendous amount of progress. It's not moving fast enough, but the general trend is positive."

One indicator of the progress is the percentage of Hispanic students attending UH.

In the fall semester of 1975, 1719 Hispanic students attended UH, making up about 6 percent of the total enrollment.

During the fall semester of 1994, 4017 Hispanic students attended UH. This figure represents about 13 percent of the total students at UH.

 

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HOUSTON MEN'S, WOMEN'S TEAMS SWEEP SMU

 

by William German

Daily Cougar Staff

A trip to Dallas this weekend proved fruitful for the Cougars men's and women's basketball teams, both of whom posted victories over SMU Saturday.

The men won their second straight Southwest Conference game by staving off the Mustangs in the closing seconds to survive 73-71 and move out of last place in the process.

The Cougars improved to 2-4 in the SWC and 5-13 overall, breaking an 0-8 road streak this season, while winning their first game outside the city of Houston since Dec. 4, 1993.

"It was a tough one," head coach Alvin Brooks said of the game. "I knew it would be as pivotal a game for SMU as it was for us."

Tim Moore made headlines with a blocked shot and tip-away of a lob pass on SMU's final possession. He also scored six of UH's final eight points.

"Tim is a play-maker," Brooks said. "If we could get it down to just a possession or two game, where you've got to make a play here or a play there, I thought (Moore) would do that and he did that for us."

While Moore finished 9-of-17 for 20 points and a game-high 14 rebounds, junior forward Kirk Ford enjoyed another solid game, going 11-of-12 from the free-throw line to score 22 points.

The Mustangs, led by Jemeil Rich's 19 points, dropped to 4-13, 1-5 in the SWC. SMU outshot the Cougars 84-55 but made only one more field goal for a .333 percentage.

A couple of hours after the men finished, the Lady Cougars showed themselves to be a team on the rise, polishing off the Lady Mustangs 92-82.

The Cougars (8-9, 3-3) pulled into fifth place in the SWC, one game behind Texas, their next conference opponent. The new-found dynamic duo of guard Stacy Johnson and forward Pat Luckey put up 27 and 26 points respectively.

Southern Methodist (11-7, 2-4) outrebounded Houston 45-35 thanks to an 18-board effort from forward Kim Brandl. The Mustangs also made 28 of 32 free throws, but were outshot from the field 52 percent to 41.

Luckey and Johnson combined to go 21-of-39 from the floor and 11-of-14 from the line. Freshman Jennifer Jones contributed 13 points and six rebounds, while junior Rosheda Hopson swatted away five Mustangs shots and grabbed five caroms.

 

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UH'S ANDERSON, DAVIS QUALIFY FOR NCAA FINALS

by M. S. Ameen

Daily Cougar Staff

Again the Houston men's and women's track teams return from Louisiana with two individual NCAA championship bids.

Both teams finished second behind the host school in the LSU Purple Tiger Classic Saturday in Baton Rouge.

Assistant track coach Mike Takaha said he felt the results from this meet were promising.

"Our kids competed very well, but LSU is tough to beat at home," he said.

Takaha added that the intensity level of the UH teams at this meet was different from that of the season opener last weekend in Baton Rouge.

"Last week everyone was pumped up about the first meet," he said. "This week we were more business-like and we weren't quite as mentally up for this meet."

Ubeja Anderson won the 55-meter hurdles and provisionally qualified for the NCAA championships in that event.

Other first-place finishers for the men were Sheddric Fields in the long jump and Chris Lopez in the triple jump.

Junior transfer DeMonica Davis provisionally qualified in the women's 55-meter dash, while distance runner Christy Bench scored team points with a victory in the women's 3000-meters.

 

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'MR. COOG' SHARES 49 YEARS OF NOSTALGIA

2-18-1

UH FAN HAS SEEN ALL BUT 4 GAMES

by Roslyn Lang

Daily Cougar Staff

"Mr. Coog" has been a Cougars fan for 50 years -- Okay 49 -- but who's counting? Everyone, especially the UH athletics department.

Next year will mark the 50th anniversary of UH football and basketball. During those years "Mr. Coog," James Langham, 77, has only missed four home football games and not many more home basketball games. He has been on bus trips with the teams "coast to coast."

Langham's streak started several days after he was discharged from the Army, where he served in France during the Battle of the Bulge in World War II. Langham said he came to Houston to manage his uncle's bookstore and was looking for a team to support.

"I didn't even know there was a University of Houston. I saw those guys out there in their red suits and all, practicing for football. I got started right then, September of '46," Langham said.

Though boxing was the only sport in which Langham competed, he has always loved sports. While growing up in Ft. Worth, Langham and his friends would climb a 30-foot fence to watch the Texas Christian Horned Frogs.

John Sullivan, of the UH Sports Information Department, is gathering Cougars memorabilia for the "Hall of Fame" that is to be part of the yet-to-be-named, state-of-the-art sports complex scheduled to be completed in April or May of this year. Sullivan said that Langham's donation of sports memorabilia was the single largest.

"Thanks to Mr. Langham we were able to build a chronological history," Sullivan said.

Some of the items being cataloged include more than 500 programs from all around the country that date back decades, various news clippings, a pair of wine decanters from the mid-70s, Langham's 1984 licence plate "Mr. Coog," some autographed balls, a "Phi Slama Jama" jacket from the early 1980s and several jerseys, including his own with a number "1" and LANGHAM on the back.

Langham said he brought five carloads of memorabilia for the hall of fame.

"My wife said the memorabilia's got to go or you," he said. "Every time I look under another bed, there will be some I've forgotten."

Langham married Virginia Noack on Jan. 12, 1948.

"She said the minute she saw me come down that isle and join Baptist Temple, ' that's the man for me,' " Langham said. "Of course now, everybody in life is entitled to one mistake and she made that when she chose me -- but brother I made up for it when I got her. She's been a doll."

Virginia Langham has been accompanying her husband to football and basketball games ever since.

"I brought her right on in," he said. The Langhams have two sons Whatley and Bobby and one 4-year-old grandson, Joshua.

Langham retired from Westheimer Rigging in 1979. Aside from his allegiance to the Cougars, Langham is an active member of Emanuel Baptist church and makes ice cream and fudge, much of which is for the Cougars.

Since the early 70s, Langham has provided homemade ice cream for everyone associated with the football, basketball and volleyball teams. Langham said he makes 12 gallons of ice cream for the football team alone, flavors from vanilla and strawberry to Hawaiian punch and peanut butter. Langham said that over the years he has made more than 1000 gallons of ice cream.

"I don't want to take credit and I don't want anyone to think I'm bragging because I've had a lot of help, " Langham said. "I have a lot of friends who give me sugar, give me cash, a lot of things that help buy the ingredients. Virginia makes German chocolate and carrot cakes to go with the ice cream."

At Christmas the Langhams give everyone associated with the men's and women's basketball teams each an apple, an orange and two bags of fudge.

"I've made candy all my life, since I was a little kid and I just thought it would be something for those who are away from home and probably didn't have anything like that," Langham said.

He said the candy tradition began in 1976 when he made up baskets in the school's colors with fudge for the football team, which had just won a Cotton Bowl bid by defeating Rice.

Langham's support is a boost to all of the teams, and the players who come back to campus make a special effort to see him, Sullivan said.

"The coaches love it because he's supporting them and he makes them think they are number one regardless of what they've won or lost," he said. "I wish we had 40,000 just like him."

Jessie Kenlaw, head coach of the women's basketball team said Langham is their most loyal fan.

"He supports women's basketball, win or lose," she said. "The women's teams are often neglected and he does the little things that make the young ladies feel appreciated."

Reminiscing about the last 49 years, Langham said, "It's been a good ride. If I get into a little shouting match with anybody from another school I say, ' now lookey -- check back with me when your team goes to five Final Fours, wins 16 national golf titles, and your baseball team goes to the finals. You come back to me and we'll talk this over.' That's generally the end of the conversation, especially with the Aggies.

"I respect 'em but I love to beat 'em."

 

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STABILIZING THE MEXICAN PESO -- A HEAVY DEBATE FOR TEXANS

by Clydenestra Brooks

Contributing Writer

Mexican economic stabilization became the dominating topic of City Councilman Ben Reyes' press conference Wednesday, as he addressed the many advantages Houston stands to gain.

The newly proposed U.S. loan guarantee for Mexico outlines several issues which deal with Mexico's economic structure, while economically benefiting Texas.

"Not only is Mexico our geographical neighbor, but we are linked to them economically," Reyes said. "This loan guarantee is a realistic approach in helping our neighbor."

Reyes focused on the financial benefits that Houston enjoys, stating that almost 44 percent of the business in the Galleria area comes from Mexico, while almost 40 percent of the Medical Center's business is affected.

"The loan guarantee would not only assist the Mexican economy, but (would) also eliminate the adverse economic impact, which could result through a domino effect recession," Reyes said. "There may be some jobs in jeopardy in Houston, and the surrounding metropolitan areas."

Should the guarantee not be approved by Congress, Reyes stated that U.S. exports to Mexico would be reduced, thus cutting out U.S. jobs that rely on such exports. He also states that increased illegal immigration would become a more pressing issue.

Reyes further emphasized that the proposed loan guarantee program is not foreign aid, and it includes provisions to ensure that Mexico continues its economic and fiscal reforms.

"We are not the only ones pushing this; other countries will be assisting Mexico as well," he said.

According to UH Economics Professor Tom DeGregori, Japan and Canada will join forces with the United States to give added stabilization to Mexico.

"People must understand that we are not putting up any money," he said. "This is not a loan, it's a loan guarantee. There's a big difference."

The program is carefully structured to operate at no cost to the United States. The Mexican government will pay to use the program, and the United States may profit.

"We're not using our money to help Mexico," DeGregori said. "The only money being transferred is from Mexico to us. Mexico is our third largest trading export, and if we follow through with this program we'll have two benefits: larger amounts of free trade, and lower-costing goods."

"We're benefiting right now, and we don't even realize it," DeGregori said of trade with Mexico. "For the person who loses his job because of trade and exports decreasing, these benefits don't mean anything."

Reyes said that President Clinton has called on the International Monetary fund, the World Bank and Inter-American Development Bank to develop this support program for Mexico.

With the peso recently losing nearly a fifth of its value, Reyes said he feels it is time for added stabilization in the Mexican economy.

"America has vital interests in Mexico's economic future," he said. "If we don't act now, Mexico faces a protracted economic crisis that would have severe consequences for us."

Aside from the economic structure, Reyes commented on other issues, such as zoning, term limitation and juvenile boot camps. Although City Council removed the word "zoning" from the Planning and Zoning Commission, Reyes is a strong advocate of the issue.

"I'm for zoning; and those people who didn't get out to vote should have," he said. "Zoning allows people to control their neighborhoods. All it does is give citizens the opportunity to participate."

As for juvenile justice, Reyes said it is ridiculous and too expensive to keep juveniles incarcerated.

"It's much easier and less expensive to prevent crimes rather than incarcerate juveniles," he said. "There's not even a revolving door; they have no door. We should be willing to spend that money on trying to educate them, or paying tuition at Harvard."

With Reyes' 14-year tenure on City Council, he plans to continue his involvement with the loan guarantee program, while focusing on more localized issues as well.

 

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STABILIZING THE MEXICAN PESO -- A HEAVY DEBATE FOR TEXANS

by Clydenestra Brooks

Contributing Writer

Mexican economic stabilization is in Houston's best interest, City Councilman Ben Reyes said Wednesday, as he addressed the many advantages Houston stands to gain.

The newly proposed U.S. loan guarantee for Mexico outlines several issues that deal with Mexico's economic structure, while economically benefiting Texas.

"Not only is Mexico our geographical neighbor, but we are linked to them economically," Reyes said. "This loan guarantee is a realistic approach in helping our neighbor."

Reyes focused on the financial benefits that Houston enjoys, stating that almost 44 percent of the business in the Galleria area comes from Mexico, while almost 40 percent of the Medical Center's business is affected.

"The loan guarantee would not only assist the Mexican economy, but (would) also eliminate the adverse economic impact, which could result through a domino effect recession," Reyes said. "There may be some jobs in jeopardy in Houston, and the surrounding metropolitan areas."

Should the guarantee not be approved by Congress, Reyes stated that U.S. exports to Mexico would be reduced, thus cutting out U.S. jobs that rely on such exports. He also states that increased illegal immigration would become a more pressing issue.

Reyes further emphasized that the proposed loan guarantee program is not foreign aid, and it includes provisions to ensure that Mexico continues its economic and fiscal reforms.

"We are not the only ones pushing this; other countries will be assisting Mexico as well," he said.

According to UH Economics Professor Tom DeGregori, Japan and Canada will join forces with the United States to give added stabilization to Mexico.

"People must understand that we are not putting up any money," he said. "This is not a loan, it's a loan guarantee. There's a big difference."

The program is carefully structured to operate at no cost to the United States. The Mexican government will pay to use the program, and the United States may profit.

"We're not using our money to help Mexico," DeGregori said. "The only money being transferred is from Mexico to us. Mexico is our third largest trading export, and if we follow through with this program we'll have two benefits: larger amounts of free trade, and lower-costing goods."

"We're benefiting right now, and we don't even realize it," DeGregori said of trade with Mexico. "For the person who loses his job because of trade and exports decreasing, these benefits don't mean anything."

Reyes said that President Clinton has called on the International Monetary fund, the World Bank and Inter-American Development Bank to develop this support program for Mexico.

With the peso recently losing nearly a fifth of its value, Reyes said he feels it is time for added stabilization in the Mexican economy.

"America has vital interests in Mexico's economic future," he said. "If we don't act now, Mexico faces a protracted economic crisis that would have severe consequences for us."

Aside from the economic structure, Reyes commented on other issues, such as zoning, term limitation and juvenile boot camps. Although City Council removed the word "zoning" from the Planning and Zoning Commission, Reyes is a strong advocate of the issue.

"I'm for zoning; and those people who didn't get out to vote should have," he said. "Zoning allows people to control their neighborhoods. All it does is give citizens the opportunity to participate."

As for juvenile justice, Reyes said it is ridiculous and too expensive to keep juveniles incarcerated.

"It's much easier and less expensive to prevent crimes rather than incarcerate juveniles," he said. "There's not even a revolving door; they have no door. We should be willing to spend that money on trying to educate them, or paying tuition at Harvard."

With Reyes' 14-year tenure on City Council, he plans to continue his involvement with the loan guarantee program, while focusing on more localized issues as well.

 

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SCHOLARSHIPS UP FOR GRAB TO ALL UH STUDENTS

by Christen Hanlon

Daily Cougar Staff

In present economic times, financing a college education is becoming more difficult each year. It's refreshing to know there is a means to offset some of these costs.

The National Commission on student Financial Aid found that of the available $7 billion scholarship dollars offered by the private sector last year, only $400 million was awarded.

It is estimated that the average scholarship award for an undergraduate is between $4,000 and $5,000 per year. Most of these scholarships are not based on grades and do not require you to divulge income statements. Many take into account your organizational affiliations, talent, employment history, ethnic background and your father's or mother's occupation.

Scott Moore, Financial Aid Counselor at UH, felt that most students were not aware that many scholarships are based on much more than grade point average. "Most think that scholarships are based on GPA, and a lot of people feel that their's just isn't good enough," Moore said.

Responding to why students don't take advantage of scholarship opportunities, Moore replied, "There's some legwork involved with scholarships that is not there with financial aid, so some feel that scholarships are just too time consuming. Some simply just don't know that they exist."

Many scholarships are obtainable through the university. "Students who are interested should check with the dean of their department or go to the scholarship office and look through the book of available scholarships. This office is in E. Cullen, Room 23," Moore said.

Brady Lanclos, a freshman Mechanical Engineering major at UH, said he knew that some scholarships were available through the university. "I have never applied for one at UH, but I would consider it if I found one. I did not know that some scholarships were not based on grade point average alone," Lanclos said.

If you would like to discover how to get your share of the $6.6 billion of unawarded private sector scholarship funds, write to GGS Enterprises, 7040 W. Palmetto Park Road, Suite 2-553, Boca Raton, Florida 33433.

 

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CATCH THE ENGINE ALLEY

by Jim Presnell

Daily Cougar Staff

The record label conglomerates continue to sign hundreds of new bands every year in an attempt to reach that platinum pop music nirvana. That plateau eludes something like 99 percent of artists through their entire (often mercifully short) careers.

The Engine Alley eponymous disc caught my eye because one of its producers was Steve Lillywhite, the genius who has worked recurrently with such experimental ground breakers in atmospheric pop as U2 and Brian Eno.

It's a pleasing record, with Engine Alley turning out pleasant, inventive, pop-oriented gems such as "Mrs. Winder," which contains the insidious lyrics, "Mrs. Winder can't talk to the neighbors / She prefers LSD / And it's surprising the things you see / On cauliflower and broccoli ... "

There's a haunting instrumental, "Spare Me," which at lease in philosophy reminds me of the Simple Minds' "Film Theme" from its inventive second album <I>Reel to Real Cacophony<P>.

The sound keeps a variety show going throughout the record. There is a string-laden, unusual album closer in the song "The Flowers," which contains weird lines such as "But hey! You! / You with the face that reminds me of space / You look so dangerous I hope it's contagious I hate my friends / But I still love the flowers," reminding one of a twisted Kinks song.

Engine Alley presents cheerful-sounding pop with dark, edgy lyrics in abundance and absorbing listening.

 

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AFRICAN ALBUM ENTRANCING

by Frank San Miguel

Daily Cougar Staff

<I>The Trance of Seven Colors<P> is as enigmatic as it is engaging. The elements are more than two ships in the night, but two reefs brought together by some unknown force.

The first in this primordial concoction is Pharoah Sanders, a tenor saxophonist from the recesses of jazz. He played with the likes of legends Arnette Coleman, Sun Ra, John Coltrane and others to usher in an era of free-floating sounds. The second is Maleem Mahmoud Ghania, a Moroccan master of the music named after the African tribe Gnawa. While hardly known stateside, his music and influence, like Sanders', is appreciated elsewhere.

<I>Trance<P> was put together in Morocco, where Sanders, a devout Muslim, wanted to visit at least once. Actually, he had previously worked with Moroccan musicians during his storied career, but this was the first time he'd travelled to the country. The appeal of working with Ghania and his family, also adherents of Islam, as well as fringe producer Bill Laswell (who'd worked with William Burroughs, among others) proved to be the right bait. Sanders' work on this release is impressive.

The Gnawa tribe descended from the black African Fulani, Peul and Bambara of Southern Mali and Guinea. The Gnawa originally came to Morocco as slaves at the beginning of the 16th century. The baleful clamber of such tainted roots is apparent through the music.

The <I>Trance<P> sounds, traditionally used as a healing and purification ceremony, is West African-influenced and North African-born. Ghania's music is inflected by traditional instruments, with an accompaniment of a phalanx of background musicians. For the contemporary listener, Gnawa sounds in a way like a combination of free jazz, a dance music derivative called trance and spurious blues with a strong dose of Middle Eastern music.

Some have compared Gnawa to today's ambient gnashings, but, once you turn on <I>Trance<P>, the comparisons seem incomplete or, at the very least, short.

Picture a circle of musicians, each acting as vocal chorus and wielding a <I>krkabak<P>, or foot-long steel clapper. They accompany the <I>maleem<P>, or master, who plays the <I>guimbri<P>, a three-foot drum whose body can be pounded and strings can be plucked. Each performance is a ceremony, or <I>lilla<P>, and songs are <I>mluks<P>, which are to guide the spirits as they course through the dancers. The opening track, "La Allah Dayim Moulenah," puts one right in the middle of the circle.

As one courses from song to song, the simplicity as complexity paradox is somehow overshadowed by the skilled musicianship. While a rudimentary instrument, the <I>krkabak<P> is nonetheless played with a great deal of dexterity and skill by the players. The resonance of the <I>guimbri<P> rumbles your guts as the chorus, sung in Gnawan dialect, washes over the song. Ghania's voice is distinct throughout, as is the sax work of Sanders, reminiscent of Coltrane in his later years.

A rugged canvas sack of rich textures, ancient but still strong, carries this package. Laswell gets credit for not letting the cat out either.

<I>The Trance of Seven Colors<P> is one of the better releases for the close of 1994 and is a good tiding for parent label Axiom for 1995. Just when you think you've heard it all, someone throws you a completely captivating curve.

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<I>MADNESS<P> NOT JUST ANOTHER STUFFY BRITISH FILM

by Sean Fitzpatrick

Daily Cougar Staff

<I>The Madness of King George<P> is a British period piece, which should not damn it outright. After all, we are talking about the home of Shakespeare, who put out quite a few period pieces in his time.

But modern movie-goers have been smothered with stuffy Merchant-Ivory exports like <I>Howard's End<P> and <I>The Remains of the Day<P>, movies that are exquisitely costumed and shot, and move with the pace of snails on Thorazine.

So dubiousness is in order at movies like <I>Madness<P>, especially when the director, Nicholas Hytner, is a first timer, having come directly from a long and distinguished theater career. What works so well on stage sounds just like what it is on screen, namely, ungodly complex and convoluted dialogue that nobody ever spontaneously utters.

This is the Britain of the 1780s and '90s, though, when people actually spoke this way (or so Hollywood would have us believe). And Alan Bennett's screenwriting pops more than it drags. No extended soliloquies, hallelujah.

Bennett's screenplay, adapted from his stage play <I>The Madness of George III<P>, introduces King George as a vibrant, often irritating monarch obsessed with the lost colonies. Nigel Hawthorne originated the role of George onstage and moves through the lavish sets with assurance.

George begins the film as a powerful but idiosyncratic ruler. His son, the Prince of Wales (Rupert Everett), pities himself immensely for being denied a hand in power, and the king doesn't help his self-esteem by goading him about his increasing paunch.

When George begins to behave erratically, interrupting a concert to give a clinic on proper piano technique and jumping his queen's lady-in-waiting (Amanda Donohoe), the prince sees an opportunity to gain power.

Doctors skitter about searching for a diagnosis; one doctor reads the king's future in the shape and texture of the king's stool, and at another point the illness is attributed to George's unfailing faithfulness to his wife.

Enter Dr. Willis (Ian Holm), a rural doctor with no credentials who runs the first funny farm in the British countryside. Willis takes the king, who has slipped farther into indignity, to a rundown royal country house and cares for the king by strapping him down whenever he behaves erratically.

The plot unfolds predictably from there. Will the king regain his senses before the evil forces in Parliament orchestrate the prince's rise to the throne? Will the radical new therapist be thwarted by the stool-inspecting royal doctors?

Small moments make <I>Madness<P> work. George's relationship with Willis is key; Hawthorne gives the king a quiet dignity throughout his insane periods, and Holm (<I>Chariots of Fire<P>) resists showboating. George's foray into Shakespeare provided the biggest laugh of the evening without making the king a caricature.

One major miscue was hiring Helen Mirren (<I>The Cook, The Thief, His Wife and Her Lover<P>) to provide little more than window dressing as Queen Charlotte. Mirren works wonders with what she is given, but it is written as a man's movie (this is the 18th century, after all), and her few moments on screen only made me wish for more.

If you're an Anglophile, you will probably want to plunk down the art house admission price. Otherwise, wait for video, but check it out if you can.

The Madness of King George

Stars: Nigel Hawthorne, Helen Mirren

Director: Nicholas Hytner

2 1/2 stars

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