CHARGES FILED AGAINST SA'S ZUBER, FULLER

by James V. Geluso

Daily Cougar Staff

Students' Association presidential candidate Hunter Jackson filed charges against SA Sen. Jennifer Zuber and Senate Speaker Jeff Fuller Monday.

According to Jackson, charges were filed with Assistant Dean of Students Kathleen Anzivino in a meeting Monday afternoon. The charges allege that Zuber and Fuller violated section 3.15 of the UH Disciplinary Code, which forbids falsification of records.

Anzivino said all actions concerning disciplinary procedures are confidential and that she could neither confirm nor deny that any charges were received.

The charges stem from allegations that Zuber and Fuller forged signatures on applications for several of the candidates in the C.L.A.S.S. Party. Zuber was running for vice president, and Fuller was working as campaign manager for the party.

The signatures were forged because of confusion over whether the applications had to be signed. The application said to sign if the candidate had read the Election Code, but no copies of the code were available, Zuber and Fuller said.

Zuber said Annette Garcia, assistant election commissioner, told her on Feb. 15 that candidates did not need to sign the forms if they had not read the code. On Feb. 17, assistant election commissioner Bill Carroll told Zuber that signatures were required.

Election commissioner Robert Kramp removed Fuller and Zuber from the election, alleging both had admitted to forging the signatures.

Zuber and Fuller both contended that only Fuller actually signed the forms.

"I think this is being done out of spite," Zuber said. "We've already been punished for this. Why can't he just let it go?"

Both Fuller and Zuber said they thought Jackson was not interested in justice. "I think it's politically motivated because Hunter knows he's not going to make the runoff," Fuller said.

"Hunter Jackson is going down (in the election), and he's trying to take everyone else with him," Zuber said.

According to Jackson, the Dean of Students Office will send letters to Fuller and Zuber sometime this week, but no action will be taken until after Spring Break.

 

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UH EYES LAMAR UNIVERSITY SYSTEM STRUGGLE

by Kevin Patton

Daily Cougar Staff

UH faculty are not alone in their quest to end a Texas System's control over a university.

The Lamar University System, comprised of three two-year colleges and one four-year university, is in the midst of a bitter fight for survival.

After a two-year public battle, much like the one being waged between the UH System and faculty over the role and size of the System, mounting pressure and continual administrative gaffes –like gaining a multi-million-dollar research grant for shipbuilding at LU-Orange, a two-year junior college – may end this East Texas System.

State Rep. Mark Stiles, D-Fannet, has legislation pending that would dissolve the Lamar System into the Texas State University System, which includes Sam Houston State and Southwest Texas State.

Dade Phelem, Stiles' administrative aide, said the representative may not file the bill because pressure from alumni and Lamar's Board of Regents may result in a compromise.

Lamar's regents voted against the measure, as did the student governments on all four campuses.

However, it seems the Legislature has already punished the Lamar System by dropping the regular System line-item appropriation to $29,000 per year, down from $630,000. This comes on the heels of a state audit ripping the management controls and leadership capabilities of the System.

The Legislature has also not appropriated any money for the John Grey Institute, an official university foundation set up to be an independent and private research institution dealing with the economic development of Southeast Texas.

Lamar System spokesman Bill Maddox said, "There's a feeling on the Beaumont campus that the two-year campuses take away students."

He said issues of duplication and the "extra layer of administration" are viewed as problems by the faculty.

However, he noted that the System is not heavy-handed and that after an internal audit, the System followed the advice given by "sharpshooters."

"(The System) had been charged with micromanaging, but the (audit) recommended the same structure," he said.

But the LU-Beaumont Faculty Senate passed a resolution March 1 supporting the dissolving of the System.

"... the entire history of the Lamar University System has been plagued with turmoil, political in-fighting, fiscal mismanagement and administrative inefficiency and excess," the resolution stated. Donna Birdwell-Pheasant, Faculty Senate president, said, "(The resolution) dissolves the System, but does not break any ties (between the universities)."

She added that TSUS is the only existing System that could accommodate Lamar.

She also said she sees similarities in her situation and UH's. "We were tempted to cross out the UH (at the top of the Houston Chronicle editorials) and put in Lamar and publish them," she said.

But Wendy Adair, UH vice chancellor for university relations, said the situations stem from different sets of problems.

She cited the favorable state audit that lauded the UH System's reshaping efforts.

"If (Lamar's situation) is because of the state audit, (the Legislature's move) is a reflection of the Legislature believing that Lamar has not been able to handle their business," she said.

There is no parallel, she added.

However, Harrell Rodgers, former dean of the College of Social Sciences, said the situations are almost identical.

"The parallel you see is that the representative is saying there is no need for the duplication, the situation where the chancellor overshadows the president. We've seen the effects of that at UH," he said.

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UH EYES LAMAR UNIVERSITY SYSTEM STRUGGLE

by Kevin Patton

Daily Cougar Staff

UH faculty are not alone in their quest to end a Texas System's control over a university.

The Lamar University System, comprised of three two-year colleges and one four-year university, is in the midst of a bitter fight for survival.

After a two-year public battle, much like the one being waged between the UH System and faculty over the role and size of the System, mounting pressure and continual administrative gaffes –like gaining a multi-million-dollar research grant for shipbuilding at LU-Orange, a two-year junior college – may end this East Texas System.

State Rep. Mark Stiles, D-Fannet, has legislation pending that would dissolve the Lamar System into the Texas State University System, which includes Sam Houston State and Southwest Texas State.

Dade Phelem, Stiles' administrative aide, said the representative may not file the bill because pressure from alumni and Lamar's Board of Regents may result in a compromise.

Lamar's regents voted against the measure, as did the student governments on all four campuses.

However, it seems the Legislature has already punished the Lamar System by dropping the regular System line-item appropriation to $29,000 per year, down from $630,000. This comes on the heels of a state audit ripping the management controls and leadership capabilities of the System.

The Legislature has also not appropriated any money for the John Grey Institute, an official university foundation set up to be an independent and private research institution dealing with the economic development of Southeast Texas.

Lamar System spokesman Bill Maddox said, "There's a feeling on the Beaumont campus that the two-year campuses take away students."

He said issues of duplication and the "extra layer of administration" are viewed as problems by the faculty.

However, he noted that the System is not heavy-handed and that after an internal audit, the System followed the advice given by "sharpshooters."

"(The System) had been charged with micromanaging, but the (audit) recommended the same structure," he said.

But the LU-Beaumont Faculty Senate passed a resolution March 1 supporting the dissolving of the System.

"... the entire history of the Lamar University System has been plagued with turmoil, political in-fighting, fiscal mismanagement and administrative inefficiency and excess," the resolution stated. Donna Birdwell-Pheasant, Faculty Senate president, said, "(The resolution) dissolves the System, but does not break any ties (between the universities)."

She added that TSUS is the only existing System that could accommodate Lamar.

She also said she sees similarities in her situation and UH's. "We were tempted to cross out the UH (at the top of the Houston Chronicle editorials) and put in Lamar and publish them," she said.

But Wendy Adair, UH vice chancellor for university relations, said the situations stem from different sets of problems.

She cited the favorable state audit that lauded the UH System's reshaping efforts.

"If (Lamar's situation) is because of the state audit, (the Legislature's move) is a reflection of the Legislature believing that Lamar has not been able to handle their business," she said.

There is no parallel, she added.

However, Harrell Rodgers, former dean of the College of Social Sciences, said the situations are almost identical.

"The parallel you see is that the representative is saying there is no need for the duplication, the situation where the chancellor overshadows the president. We've seen the effects of that at UH," he said.

 

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CHOOSING A MAJOR NO MINOR UNDERTAKING

by Mariana Ivanova

News Reporter

While a UH student was struggling to receive helpful information from English Department administrators, and another was trying to find out how much math it takes to become a mechanical engineer, a Rice University student was watching <I>Rain Man<P> and dreaming of being a psychiatrist.

Students often change their majors because of uncooperative departmental administrators or due to the time and the nature of the classes required for a particular major, said Fernanda del Villar and Marvin Wolff, UH seniors.

Other students find the number of offered majors insufficient, or they are unaware of the kinds of jobs their majors can provide, according to Vesela Vladimirova, a Rice University freshman.

Del Villar, 20, is majoring in history with a minor in journalism. When she entered college, she wanted a double major in history and English. Soon after she started taking classes, she found the people from the English Department to be uncooperative.

"The professors were never available for anything," Del Villar said. "When I would ask the people at the offices for information, they would tell me, 'The sheets are over there.' They were one of the reasons why I decided to change my major."

She wanted to study something that involves writing, so she went to the Journalism Department and spoke to Professor Ted Stanton. He gave her advice and told her what classes she needed to take.

"That was really impressive," Del Villar said. "I have never had anyone, except my mom, who will sit and talk to me as much as he did.

"Many students spend a lot of time finding themselves. We need professors like him to help them."

One of those students is Marvin Wolff, 29, who has a major in psychology and a minor in Spanish. "I think I hold the record for changing majors," he said.

He entered UH in 1986 and wanted to become a mechanical engineer. Soon he found the nature of the classes "too abstract. There was too much math," Wolff said.

A year later, he switched to technology and business, but his classes were taught mostly by foreign professors, whom he found hard to understand and take notes from.

Wolff then decided to major in Spanish, which he thought would be easy because Spanish is his native language. Soon after that, he found psychology interesting, and it remains his current major.

"Most students change majors because they find the classes too difficult or because the nature of their majors turn out not to be what they have expected," Wolff said.

Rice University offers a much smaller selection of majors than UH, and that makes it hard for the undecided students to make up their minds, said Vesela Vladimirova, 18, who is there on a full athletic scholarship, but hasn't decided on her major yet.

"I want to study management, but what can I do with it?" Vladimirova said. "Does it mean I will work for a company or form my own organization and manage it?"

Students should be offered more information about the type of jobs they can get with certain degrees, she said.

Although every student is striving toward a diploma, it is not always his or her dream degree. The ideal double major for Del Villar would be English/journalism, she said. For Wolff, it would be a nonexisting one -- marine mammal psychology.

The Rice University student is even more imaginative "Ever since I saw the movie <I>Rain Man<P>, I want to be a psychiatrist, but without having to go to medical school," she said.

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SA PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES' PLATFORMS

Party: C.L.A.S.S.

Presidential Candidate: Giovanni Garibay

Classification: Junior

Major: Entrepreneurship

Age: 20

Past SA Position(s): Business school senator

Platform: • Secure financial aid for all UH students in need

• Improve the upkeep and maintenance of UH buildings

• Realistic, affordable solutions to the parking situation

• Improve academic advising in all colleges

Garibay has a simple approach to getting the job done as president: "Go in there, set goals, have them posted up where everybody can see them, be responsible for them, and have a plan for how you're going to reach those goals."

Even before elections, the goals are not only set and posted, but plans are set to reach each one, Garibay said.

"We know people in Washington," he said. "We've built a data base with people like Jason Fuller. We've talked to congressmen and asked them not to cut funding."

"I know the man in charge of (improving the upkeep and maintenance of UH buildings) personally. I talked to him about it. He has some ideas, but I noticed one thing: he didn't have student input. It's just us taking the time. They seem really willing to work with students."

Other Party Info:

Student Regent Candidate: Jerod Dame

SA Experience: Garibay and Dame are currently SA senators, as are eight of their 25 senate candidates.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Party: LEAD

Presidential Candidate: Hunter Jackson

Classification: Senior

Major: Management

Age: 20

Past SA Position(s): Business senator

Platform: • The Teacher Assessment Accessibility Act (a computer data base in the library to access information on teacher evaluations)

• The Students' Coalition for Excellence Act (Support the Coalition for Excellence in fight against UH System)

• The Campus Security Restoration Act (to improve campus security)

• Students' Association Accountability Act (referendum to dissolve SA if other planks are not acted on)

In this year's elections, Jackson is promising his constituents one thing: He will get the job done -- or else.

"Or else" refers to a referendum Jackson promises to hold Nov. 7 if he and his party have not taken action on their platform. At the referendum, students can vote to abolish Students' Association.

"We don't deserve to be there if we don't keep our word," Jackson said. "I don't see that happening because we are going to keep it."

Other Party Info:

Vice-presidential Candidate: K.K. Lilie

Student Regent Candidate: Angela Lipsey

SA Experience: Jackson is currently a senator. Lilie was student regent until she was removed from office in February. None of the 24 candidates is currently in office.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Party: Peoples' Party

Presidential Candidate: Henry Bell

Classification: Junior

Major: Economics

Age: 24

Past SA Position(s): Social sciences senator

Vice president

Platform: • Improve student services, especially in the Bursar's Office

• Improve parking situation

• Increase funding for the library

Bell has one major goal in mind for his presidency: to make SA more accessible to the students.

"I feel all of these (SA) positions are workers for the students," Bell said. "The president of SA is a representative of students. You have to be out there, talking to people to see how you can help them."

As president, Bell says he will involve students in SA by continuing programs like Town Hall Meetings and SA Table Talks that this year's administration had featured.

"What we would be doing is piggybacking on those types of ideas," he said. "I'm a firm believer that if something is working, there is no reason to fix it. Just improve on things that work."

Other Party Info:

Vice-presidential Candidate: Dom Lewinsohn

Student Regent Candidate: Thasunda Brown

SA Experience: Bell is currently vice president. Two of 19 Senate candidates are currently in office.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Party: The Party Party

Presidential Candidate: Mike Luka

Classification: Senior

Major: Psychology/Math

Age: 21

Past SA Position(s): none

Platform: • Make intramural fields safer

• Develop campus beautification programs

• Provide free music at the UC Satellite

• Push for an increased budget for the Student Video Network

Luka may not have held any Students' Association positions in the past, but that's all part of the master plan.

"There needs to be a change of scenery in SA," Luka said. "It's the same group of people in SA year in and year out. There are a lot of people that are not involved in SA, and I want to change that a little bit."

If elected president, Luka promises to donate at least half of his salary to the library.

"I think the library is a mess," he said. "I don't see why we should get such a large salary when athletes don't get a salary. I'm also challenging the rest of the candidates to do that."

Other Party Info:

Vice presidential Candidate: John Olszewski

Student Regent Candidate: Beth Kowalewski (write-in)

SA Experience: None of the candidates has any experience in SA.

 

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LADY COOGS AND MR. HYDE

UH NOVELTIES FACE RICE IN TOURNEY

by Jason Paul Ramírez

Daily Cougar Staff

Robert Louis Stevenson never told it this well.

When the Scottish novelist wrote <I>Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde<P> in 1886, it is pretty safe to say that he assumed he would be the only individual laying claim to this famous work.

But alas, some 109 years later, Stevenson's narrative has been revised -- by none other than the Houston Lady Cougars.

The new tale goes something like this: Houston was once a prouder group, doctoring opponents in seven out of eight tries, including a 78-75 slim-precision job at then-No. 23 Texas A&M on Feb. 18.

The victory was the Cougars' first over a ranked opponent this year and, at the time, gave them sole possession of second place in the Southwest Conference.

For almost a month, since Jan. 25, everything seemed normal.

But when the Cougars returned home following the victory in College Station, they discovered a green potion before them upon arrival at Hofheinz Pavilion on Feb. 22 -- the seventh-place Baylor Lady Bears.

Not thinking of much danger, Houston consumed the potion in the wrongest of ways without realizing its apparent harm.

Then, suddenly, in just 20 short minutes, changes -- abnormal changes -- became evident. Houston wasn't rebounding; it wasn't scoring; and it didn't look like it was going to continue winning.

In short, the Cougars were turning into somewhat of an ugly monster.

The green potion had gotten the best of the Cougars, 93-77, as the newly-transformed team proceeded to drop its next two games in similar embarassing fashion (average defeat margin in the three games was 18.7 points).

So with the current three-game losing streak, things for Houston (13-13, 7-7 in the SWC) can only get better, because they can't get any worse.

Today's first-round action of the Dr Pepper SWC Postseason Classic in Dallas offers Houston its chance to free itself from the potion daze and get back on the winning track.

"Our biggest key will be our defense and defensive intensity," Houston coach Jessie Kenlaw said. "When we keep teams to shooting below 50 percent, we win those ballgames."

Such scenarios were the case with the Rice Owls (11-15, 7-7), today's noon opponent in Southern Methodist's Moody Coliseum.

The Cougars limited Rice to shoot a combined 52-of-124 (42.9 percent) in the teams' two matchups this year, both one-point decisions, however.

The Owls were victorious at Hofheinz 88-87 during opening night in SWC play on Jan. 10; Houston returned the favor at Autry Court 69-68 on Feb. 7.

"Rice just makes you play...ooohh," said Cougars guard Stacey Johnson. "I don't know what it is. We were just so sloppy in both games against them this year."

Houston's field-goal percentage in the series this season was actually worse than the Owls'. The Cougars shot 41.9 percent.

Thus, Houston may not be on the verge of breaking out of their horrendous slump after all.

"We are just going to have to play our game and continue to stop them on defense," said Johnson who averaged 16 points in the two-game series.

Though the transformed monster is killed off in Stevenson's novel, he still turns back into Dr. Jekyll at the book's conclusion.

The Cougars said they would like to turn back into their own selves again. Dying, or rather, losing is something they can do without.

"We plan on being (in Dallas) a long time," Kenlaw said.

 

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UTSA TO THROW INACTIVE HURLERS AT ACTIVE COUGAR BATS

By Richard C. Kroger

Daily Cougar Staff

A 6-1 Cougars home record awaits the Texas-San Antonio Roadrunners, who venture into the new Cougar Field tonight at 7.

The Cougars (10-7) have won four out of their last five games and look to continue their current two-game winning streak against a tough UTSA team (11-6) which beat tradition-rich Texas A&M 9-4 in College Station on Feb. 21.

Houston will throw righthander Brad Towns against the Roadrunners. Towns brings a 1-1 season record and a 3.38 ERA into tonight's game.

Head coach Rayner Noble said he is hoping to pick up another victory against the Roadrunners, but does not want to get too overconfident with the recent home wins.

"They (Roadrunners) are a very good ball club and always seem to play us hard, so we have to be ready," Noble said.

"We are still too up and down as far as winning."

The Roadrunners have not played in more than a week and have had to hold their practices indoors because of bad weather. The unexpected week off concerns UTSA head coach Jimmy Shankle, however.

"We are getting ready to start conference play next week, and I still need to find out about some of my pitchers," Shankle said.

The Roadrunners will pitch their No. 3 starter Chris Woodard (1-1, 3.71 ERA) against UH in order to rest their ace and two other top pitchers for the upcoming conference season.

That means the UTSA bullpen could be active from start to finish in order to test some of its seldom-used pitchers.

"I will probably throw three or four guys on the mound at UH just to get them some playing time," said Shankle.

The Cougars will be ready for the UTSA committee of pitchers with shortstop Jason Smiga's .325 average and first baseman Carlos Perez.

Perez had a double and a home run while racking up three RBIs in Houston's 4-1 victory vs. McNeese State Sunday.

The Roadrunners also boast a pair of dangerous hitters in second baseman Mickey Perez (.426 average) and shortstop Ryan Alevalos (19 RBIs in just 17 games).

 

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