MOJO NIXON MAKES HIS WHEREABOUTS KNOWN

by James V. Geluso

Daily Cougar Staff

Mojo Nixon is back with a new album that will definitely please his legion of fans. Whereabouts Unknown, from Ripe & Ready, is a 44-minute romp through all the themes Mojo has embraced over the years: sex, drinking and freedom. The sound is loose and happy, borrowing from traditional folk sounds as well as recent rock 'n' roll. Mojo starts off with "Gotta Be Free," an ode to penis enlargement, and careens through hedonistic songs like "The Pleasurelegience" and "Don't Ask Me Why I Drink." "Tie My Pecker to My Leg" is an easy X-rated litany that probably sounds better if you're slightly (or totally) inebriated. His performance of the song a few weeks ago at Austin's South by Southwest had the audience joining in enthusiastically. As Mojo said at the end of the song, "I know my audience." His credentials as an average guy are backed up with "Not as Much as Football," which sounds a lot like "Debbie Gibson is Pregnant with My Two-Headed Love Child," from his 1989 album Root Hog or Die, and again on "Mr. Correct," a musical spit at the arrogant rich. Nixon continues his tradition of celebrity-bashing with a cover of the Smiths' "Girlfriend In a Coma." The song starts out as a straightforward cover, but quickly veers off to become the best slam on Morrissey since the Warlock Pinchers' "Morrissey Rides the Cockhorse." "I, Mojo Nixon, am the anti-Morrissey," he proclaims. Wayne Newton and Michael Bolton also get their turns on "The Pleasurelegience." (Bolton has been a favorite target ever since Don Henley joined Mojo on stage to sing along to "Don Henley Must Die.") Mojo gets political on several songs, showing off his libertarian-populist philosophy. "My Free Will Just Ain't Willin' " is a cheerful war protest, specifically targeting the Gulf War. "I hate this murderin', hate this stinkin' war/ and I ain't gonna be George Bush's whore." "You Can't Kill Me," a defiant song to the tune of "Amazing Grace," is Mojo's political rant for the album. In a soft-spoken section, he eschews corporations and the electoral process, saying he's heading for West Virginia to lead an armed insurrection. While the prospect of a bunch of drunken frat-boys -- like those who were in the audience at South by Southwest -- toting guns and taking over isn't terribly pleasing, we could do worse than to have Mojo in charge. In the meantime, we'll just have to listen to his records.

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MUSIC PROF WANTS TO JAZZ UP UH

by Fernanda del Villar

Contributing Writer

Music with roots in traditional jazz, like Count Basie and Duke Ellington; sight-reading; and improvisation make up the UH jazz program under Noe Marmolejo, professor of music, who has been chairman of UH's Jazz Studies Program for 10 years. In addition, he works with the Houston Youth Symphony and serves as a clinician and adjudicator in Texas. "I would like to have an International Jazz Festival week at UH," Marmolejo said. "Various jazz performances would be held all over campus for students and nonstudents alike to enjoy. "Big-name stars would perform at night," he added, "and local artists would perform during the day. "Houston is filled with excellent jazz artists playing at local jazz clubs," Marmolejo said. "People who work downtown could come have lunch at UH and listen to artists like Paul English, Warren Sneed and many other Houston-area jazz players. "We could even have high school competitions and feature the next generation of jazz artists," he said. Marmolejo's jazz ensemble, of course, would also be featured. The UH Jazz Ensemble received student service fees for next year that allowed Marmolejo to purchase a much-needed drum set and add to his music library.

 

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LAST-MINUTE SA MEETING SWEARS IN ONLY 18 SENATORS

by James V. Geluso

Daily Cougar Staff

The 32nd Students' Association Senate kicked off Monday night with a brief meeting that saw the swearing in of 18 senators and little else. Although there are 32 senators, only 18 could attend because the meeting was called late in the afternoon. SA President Giovanni Garibay said senators were called at about 2 p.m. Monday afternoon, only five hours before the meeting was scheduled to start. Also absent was Vice President Dominic Lewinsohn, who was visiting his parents in England. Present at the meeting were Clarissa Peterson and Justin McMurtry, both members of the 31st Senate who lost their re-election bids. Both Peterson and McMurtry are planning on running for speaker of the Senate. The election for speaker will be held at the next meeting, scheduled for Monday. Sen. Casey McMurtry invited his fellow senators to an informal meeting Friday to discuss the legislative process. "Hopefully, by next Monday, we can have some ideas ready to go," he said.

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UPPC TACKLES UH MISSION STATEMENT by Jennifer Smith Daily Cougar Staff At a meeting of the University Planning and Policy Council Monday, the council hosted the first of two parts of a panel on the university mission statement and passed changes in its bylaws concerning member terms and meetings. In addition, the UPPC discussed the revised version of the subcommittee's "Report of the Committee on Teaching Effectiveness and Evaluation." The mission statement, which is about a page-and-a-half long, defines UH as a public urban teaching and research university. Its goals include developing the skills of learning and thinking as well as developing the knowledge and skills necessary to qualify students for future careers. Monday's half of the panel was a dialogue between UH President James H. Pickering and Timothy McMahon, a professor of management and a member of the Coalition for Excellence. The council added its thoughts and questions. McMahon said the UPPC should ask itself what it expects to happen because of the mission statement. He said most people don't pay attention to mission statements, adding that the statement should provoke involvement and commitment. Pickering said the mission statement is not only made to satisfy the requirements of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, but also to drive the budget because it contains a summary of the university's priorities and vision. The statement also will be taken up at the next UPPC meeting May 8. Jack Ivancevich, dean of the College of Business Administration, said part of UH's strength is in its urban setting. Pickering agreed, saying UH is in a partnership with the community to deal with urban problems. Also at the meeting, UPPC Chairwoman Judy Myers said there is still inadequate information available to form a progress report on the follow-up of reshaping. "I have sent memos to deans to get follow-up information. I still don't have responses from five of them," she said. "We only have responses from two administrative bodies: from the library and from the office of the vice president for Student Affairs. We thought we'd give a little more time to get information in." The follow-up on reshaping will be presented at the next meeting. The changes made to the bylaws, which were approved at the meeting, concerned the terms of office of members and a change in when the meetings are held. The revised version of the subcommittee's "Report of the Committee on Teaching Effectiveness and Evaluation" emphasized its belief that the quality of education should be given the importance it deserves and withdrew its recommendation that standing committees should handle the job of recognition and improvement of teaching ability. Concerning the center to improve teaching, Ivancevich, who was a member of the Committee for Teaching Effectiveness, Evaluation and Research, said if the center existed, it should be equivalent to the research council. He said if the task were given to an already existing committee, it would become a little piece of what that committee does, rather than a specific aim. "Focus means not embedding it in another council," he said. Of the three official SA designates to the UPPC, none was present. SA President Giovanni Garibay has attended one meeting this semester. Neither of the other two representatives has attended any meeting this semester. When reached for comment, Garibay said, "There were certain times when I couldn't make it. I have more time after the election. "I can't speak for the others. This (SA) is still a transition thing; some people don't know what's going on. Right now, it's crazy. I'll be at the next meeting," he said.

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NOW THAT MONKEY IS OFF BACK, IT'S TIME TO MOVE ON UH IN HUNTSVILLE FOR 2 P.M. GAME

by William German

Daily Cougar Staff

The victory doesn't look huge, but it's there, at least. A 7-6 decision over No. 8 Texas Tech Friday provided the Houston Cougars baseball team with a Southwest Conference breakthrough it will try to build on in Huntsville against Sam Houston State today at 2 p.m. Saturday's doubleheader did not turn out as well for Houston, now 17-22 overall, 1-13 in the SWC. The Cougars dropped a 6-5 seven-inning opener, followed by a 15-9 trouncing in the second game. "We just didn't pitch well," head coach Rayner Noble said. "I don't know if we ever had any momentum. "We won a game. I think momentum is built over the course of winning four, five, six games in a row." That momentum will have to begin today, followed by games at Texas Christian this weekend and a Monday contest at Texas Southern. "We don't have very many nonconference games (six) left," Noble said. "We need to win a few of them to get in the right state of mind for the weekend (SWC games)." Taking the mound against Sam Houston for the Cougars will be freshman lefthander Jon McDonald (2-2, 6.64 ERA). The frosh pitched 1 2/3 innings vs. Tech in Saturday's second game, giving up two earned runs and saddling him with a 10.26 ERA in the SWC. Sam Houston, at 16-24 overall, will counter with one of three righties: Scott Davis (2-4, 4.24), Mario Johnson (0-0, 8.00) or Tim Gesino (0-0, 7.71). The Bearkats are led by first baseman Ryan Rosplock (.362 avg.), who recorded the first hit ever at the new Cougar Field Feb. 22. Houston triumphed in that game 10-2. Cougars shortstop Jason Smiga, who played at Sam Houston for three years, has been on a tear recently with a .320 SWC average, lifting his overall mark to .293. Outfielders Dustin Carr (.333 in conference) and Jason Farrow (.319), first baseman Carlos Perez (.311) and third baseman Tom Maleski (.309) have thus far led Houston in league play. The latter two lead the Cougars with 25 RBIs apiece.

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BIG, BAD BUGS MAY HELP SAVE RAIN FORESTS

by Mariana Ivanova

News Reporter

If a new hypothesis about the diversity of species of insects is proven right, it would mean there are six to 18 times as many species as there are people in Houston. Terry Erwin, a professor at the University of Missouri and a member of the Department of Entomology at the Smithsonian Institution, spoke about his hypothesis in his lecture, "How Many Different Bugs Are There? Using Insects to Measure the Earth's Biodiversity." The speech was held at the Houston Brown Education Center. After using data from scientific literature and his own assumptions from sampling insects, Erwin, who is also the director of the Smithsonian's Biological Diversity Program, put the information into formulas. "The hypothesis comes from the field, not from books," Erwin said. "Two-thirds of the new species are not known in scientific literature." Erwin started working on his hypothesis in 1982 in the Amazon Basin, in the western part of South America, "the greatest meeting of land and water in the world," he said. The hydrological system of the Amazon Basin changes rapidly, which could be part of the explanation for the great biodiversity, illustrated by the fact that one-fourth of all birds in the world live in that region, said Erwin, whose book on his hypothesis is expected to be published in three years. Another data set for the hypothesis is that with the development of new techniques of selecting and sampling insects, the number of new species increases, Erwin said. Some of these techniques are thorough surveying of forests and microhabitats. Michael Sutton, a senior program officer of the World Wildlife Fund, who was a park ranger all over the world, said, "Consider that a typical 2.3-mile square patch of rain forest contains as many as 1,500 species of flowering plants, up to 750 species of trees, 400 species of birds and as many as 42,000 species of insects." Yet, instead of helping to prove Erwin's hypothesis that is still to be tested, people are destroying the rain forest, Sutton said. Many oil factories have trashed the Amazon, leaving few places untouched, he said. Erwin is also concerned that if the countries of that region don't accept more environmentally friendly programs, South America will become as agricultural as North America, and his hypothesis will never be able to be tested. "We may be extinguishing the lives of tens of millions of species which we haven't even identified yet," Erwin said, "and extinction is forever." Joan Wicks, executive director of the Houston Zoological Society, said that in the past, conservation projects have been left to international wildlife funds and organizations. Now, more of these projects rely on individual zoos for support, she said. "Before we can attempt to rebuild animal populations in the wild, we must preserve the wildness itself," Wicks said.

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