RESTRUCTURING OF UH SYSTEM HIGH PRIORITY

by James Aldridge

Daily Cougar Staff

The resignations of UH System Chancellor Alexander Schilt, UH President James H. Pickering, UH-Victoria President Lesta Van Der Wert Turchen, and several high-ranking UH administrators, leaves the UH Board of Regents at a critical juncture.

The board expects to receive the final results of a three-month evaluation of System management at a scheduled June 22 meeting. The preliminary report, received in May, suggested three possible options for restructuring the System organization.

In the first option, the position of chancellor and the UH-Main Campus president would be combined into a single position.

The authority in this scenario would be centered on the main campus. Proponents believe the chancellor/president could make administrative decisions that better meet the needs of faculty and students.

According to the report, this arrangement would answer the charges that the System is wasteful and that the current System "protects" the satellite campuses and "impedes academic progress."

Robert Palmer, a member of the UH Faculty Senate Executive Committee, is one proponent of this plan. He said the System would be run more financially efficient and it would make the administration more oriented to the faculty and students.

Palmer said right now the UH President mediates between the System, the faculty and students. He said this proposal would eliminate the levels of bureaucracy between top administrators and students. The report suggested that this option could pose some problems, including the competition of resources from all four universities.

Another anticipated problem is the amount of time it would take for implementation. However, since Pickering and Trueba resigned, Palmer said, the vacant positions "make it easier. You don't have to fire anyone."

Palmer said most of the major steps needed to implement the first proposal could be completed within a year.

A second proposal by the System auditors would keep the System separate, but would encourage more communication and participation within the System. They said improvements would include clarification of the authority and duties of the chancellor.

Palmer said his presentation to the auditors illustrated how the line separating System administrators from university administrators has been blurred. He said the chancellor performs tasks the president is supposed to do and the president performs tasks the provost should do.

Palmer said a good example of this problem is UH's search for a permanent law school dean. He said the appointment of deans is usually conducted by the provost. The provost's choice is then submitted to the Board of Regents for approval.

However, Palmer said, Pickering was asked by the board to personally take over the law dean search.

Under the second option, an advisory council of presidents and a Systemwide Faculty Senate would be created to allow input and coordinate efforts.

Jerry Paskusz, UH Faculty Senate president, said, "It looks to me that we will have option one because so many satellites are without heads."

However, Paskusz said the Faculty Senate Executive Committees of all four UH campuses have decided by their own initiative to meet once a month.

Paskusz, who has been teaching at UH more than 30 years, said the System needs faculty input because faculty members are around much longer than administrators.

"The faculty have a longer history and can apply a historical perspective (in administrative decisions)," he said. "Chancellors and presidents sometime last only three to four years. But faculty members teach much longer and can observe trends in the quality of education and the needs of the university."

Palmer said one issue the Faculty Senates have been working to remedy is reducing the amount of discord between the UH campuses by finding a common ground between the faculties.

Palmer said the Faculty Senates also plan to discuss the possibility of sharing faculty between institutions and coordinating inter-university programs by offering equivalent courses.

"But most importantly, we would just start interacting," he said.

The final option presented in the management audit would eliminate the office of chancellor and replace that position with an executive director.

This plan is designed to satisfy those who believe the System should perform only agreed upon functions and would eliminate the "Imperial Chancellorship" perception of the System, the report said.

However, the last plan would, in the audit team's opinion, "invite even more serious problems than currently exist."

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UH CHANCELLOR STEPS DOWN MIDST RESIGNATION PARADE

by Bobby Summers

Daily Cougar Staff

After holding out for several weeks amid continuing rumors that he would soon resign or be fired by the UH System Board of Regents, UH System Chancellor Alexander Schilt announced his resignation May 26.

In his letter of resignation, Schilt, who has been chancellor since 1989, indicated he was stepping down to "make way for the beginning of a major transition for the University of Houston System."

"The recent organizational review recommends that the Board of Regents set in motion the necessary changes for our System and its components to work more efficiently – an agenda that must be implemented by a chancellor who can devote seven or eight years to bring these long-range goals to fruition," Schilt said.

Schilt also said he has been a chief executive officer in higher education for almost 20 years and is convinced this is the right time to seek a change in his professional life. Before becoming chancellor, Schilt served as president of UH-Downtown from 1980 to 1987,

UH Board of Regents Chair Wilhelmina "Beth" Morian issued a statement expressing her regret regarding Schilt's resignation.

"Dr. Schilt's resignation is the latest in a series (of resignations) that began on May 19 with that of UH President James H. Pickering," Morian said. "My fellow regents and I fully appreciate that so many simultaneous vacancies in the executive leadership may occasion anxiety about the present, as well as the future, of the UH System. I ask the community, both inside and outside the UH System, to be involved, but not anxious, during this period of transition."

Schilt's resignation followed the resignations of Pickering, UH-Victoria President Lesta Van Der Wert Turchen, UH Senior Vice President and Provost Henry Trueba, UH Senior Vice President for Administration and Finance Dennis Boyd and UH Associate Vice President for Research M. Thomas Jones.

In addition to vacancies in the office of president at two universities in the UH System, the president of UH-Clear Lake, Glen Goerke, is a finalist to become Chancellor of the University of Minnesota second-tier System.

Although UH faculty members had been calling for Schilt and Pickering's resignations for some time, many of them were surprised to see so many resignations come in so short a time.

"I was totally surprised," said Robert Palmer, a Cullen professor of history and law. "I thought there would be changes. But no one expected this."

Palmer said the Board of Regents' choice for interim president of UH is critical.

Morian said the Board will "move as quickly as possible to identify the best interim leadership" for both UH-Main Campus and UH-Victoria.

She also said the Board will "work with appropriate dispatch to identify outstanding interim leadership for the UH System."

Regarding possible future changes in the structure of the UH System, Morian said, "It is not our (the Board of Regents) intention to settle immediately the various questions about the future configuration of the administration and operations of the UH System. They are weighty questions and too much depends on how we answer them to act with haste."

Morian indicated the Board will begin addressing these questions when they meet June 2 and June 22.

 

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DON'T FRET FIGHTING WORDS; MEDIATE THEM

UH INSTITUTE OFFERS ALTERNATIVES TO FISTICUFFS

2-28-2

Blanca Hernandez-Blanco

Daily Cougar Staff

Have you had a campus organization dispute lately? Or, maybe a dispute with your roommate, you can't solve.

Don't fret, help is on the way.

The University of Houston's A.A. White Dispute Resolution Institute is looking for a way to help campus organizations, faculty and students resolve their campus disputes.

"We help lots of people and student organizations in resolving their problems. However, we usually find volunteer mediators," said E. Wendy Trachte, executive director of the institute. "We hope that in 12 to 18 months, we will have a formal process in place in order to help the campus organizations. However, we are working with the Dean of Students on that."

The institute, a nonprofit organization, was founded in 1988 by Judge Frank Evans, and named the institute after the founding Dean Emeritus of the campus's Law School, A.A. White, for the purpose of teaching and researching in the field of dispute resolutions. Alternative dispute resolution is a way to reduce the costly fees and delays in resolving litigation disputes.

The mediation course is taught to those students enrolled at the UH Law School and as a graduate course at the School of Business Administration, said Trachte. However, any student interested may enroll in the course at a discounted fee on availability basis. Financial assistance through a scholarship is available for those that qualify. According to Trachte, Texas requires 40 classroom hours of mediation training, which translates into a three-hour course that satisfies the state's statutory requirement.

"We believe that mediation is a life skill. It teaches us a way to solve problems. It involves communication skills, problem-solving skills and those skills, no matter what profession you are in, a bio-chemist to a lawyer, these are skills you need or would like to have," said Trachte.

Judy Garlow took the mediation course last summer and finished the course with added skills.

"It was a great course. It taught you a lot about negotiations and reaching an alternative resolution. It also teaches you good communication skills," said Garlow, who is works as a law clerk and will graduate from UH Law School this May.

The success of this program has already begun to show. Recently, the Institute's research project was implemented at the city of Houston in order to help employees resolve their grievances.

"The city employees were very satisfied," said Trachte. "The employees said 'this is the way problems should be solved.'

ADR allowed both parties involved in the dispute air their grievances and negotiate a solution with the aide of a mediator.

However, not all problems are resolved through mediation.

"A lot depends on the parties and their attitudes, the dispute itself and the mediator as well," Garlow said, who is qualified to serve as a mediator. The trend at the moment, said Garlow, is that a judge will order the case to mediation. "This is happening more now than before. And then, sometimes an attorney may feel he can settle it through mediation."

The program is housed at the college of Business Administration, where it recently relocated from South Texas College of Law.

"We really think that the future of ADR lies in the business field because we try to resolve matters before they get to the litigation process," Trachte said.

 

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CREATIVE WRITING PROGRAM OFFERS SUMMER SEMINARS

by Michelle A. Francis

Daily Cougar Staff

This summer, Inprint Inc., a nonprofit organization founded in 1983 to help the UH Creative Writing Program promote creative writing and appreciation for the literary arts in Houston, will sponsor three creative writing workshops, Inprint, Inc. Executive Director Nan Morris said.

Morris said these workshops have been designed to help writers at all writing levels – from the beginner to the professional. She said each workshop is open to everyone in the community, including professors, housewives, students and anyone else interested in improving their writing skills.

In addition, Morris said, local schools have offered a limited number of scholarships to English and creative writing teachers in Houston area schools who attend the workshops.

Workshop instructors will include: James Robinson, a fiction writer and visiting associate professor in the UH Creative Writing Program; Gail Donohue Storey, a 1982 UH graduate of the Creative Writing Program; and Lorenzo Thomas, an assistant professor of English at UH. They will teach classes in fiction and poetry.

Steve Stark, program administrator for the UH Creative Writing Program and one of the top three graduate writing programs in the nation, said Inprint Inc. helps to promote the literary arts in Houston.

Stark said each fall the Creative Writing Program admits 10 students to its poetry class and 10 students to its fiction class out of approximately 220 applicants. The program also grants scholarships each semester, except summer, to students participating in their graduate studies.

At Inprint Inc., participants will have a chance to share their work with their professors and peers. In addition, participants will also have the chance to have their writing critiqued by professionals.

In order for instructors to have a hands-on approach with their students, seating has been limited to at least seven, but no more than 12, adults on a first-come, first-served basis. All workshops will be held weekly for eight weeks, beginning June 6, at 1524 Sul Ross in Houston. Each session lasts three hours.

The cost for each course is $255. The last day to register is June 5. For brochures, registration forms or more information on dates and times of workshops, call 521-2026.

 

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UH ALUMNA LEAVES SIGNIFICANT CAREER

DAVIS RETIRES FROM HARRIS COUNTY HOSPITAL

Cougar Photo File

CUTLINE: Sharing a laugh ... (from left to right) Mary Archer -- former director of UH Center for Addiction Studies, Travis L. Peterson -- director of UH Center for Addiction Studies, and Kathryn S. Davis -- UH alumna and retired director of Harris County Hospital District's Chemical Dependency Services.

by Valérie C. Fouché

Daily Cougar Staff

With her recent retirement as director of Harris County Hospital District's Chemical Dependency Services, UH alumna Kathryn "Kathy" S. Davis ended a significant and pioneering career in behalf of those suffering from chemical dependency in Houston and Harris County.

Davis' career began in 1974 when she completed her training in alcoholism counseling at the Center for Addiction Studies in UH's Division of Continuing Education and Off-campus Institutes. She later returned to add drug abuse counseling knowledge to her expertise, obtaining a B.A. degree in psychology. She received a Master of Liberal Arts Degree from Houston Baptist University in 1990.

Not only was Davis in one of the first classes to complete the training in the UH Center for Addiction Studies, but she has also served the program in several capacities. She was on the advisory council from 1983-84, served a time as interim director and has taught in the program for several years.

"It has been a real privilege for me to be associated with and to teach in the University of Houston's Center for Addiction Studies," Davis said.

"It offers trainees an excellent opportunity to learn about the disease of substance abuse, along with a very comprehensive approach to intervention, assessment and referral where clients are concerned," she said.

Through a grant funded by the Texas Commission on Alcohol and Drug Abuse in 1978, Davis began Ben Taub Hospital's alcohol and drug abuse counseling services, centered in the Social Services Department. She developed the policies and procedures for the program, which eventually expanded to include a comprehensive addictions treatment program for patients of the Harris County Hospital District and an employee assistance program for staff with similar problems.

Entering the field at a time when few professionals were willing to deal with addicts -- and at a time when acceptance of alcoholism and addiction as diseases was almost nil -- Davis said a large part of her task with the Hospital District initially was that of educating the system to see these patients as ill and in need of medical care and observation over an extended period of time. This enabled the district to eventually recognize addicts as valid patients needing care in a number of both in-patient and out-patient services.

"There are generations of doctors and nurses who owe their understanding of substance abuse to Kathy," said Barbara Henley, former director of Social Services.

Henley, who initially hired Davis at Ben Taub said, "I was proud to bring her expertise to the Hospital District."

"Her leadership led to the development of the district-wide chemical dependency services," said the current Social Service Director Littrelle Levy, "and will be projected into the future because of her continual encouragement of the district to expand services to this patient population. Her leadership will be sorely missed throughout the district pavilions."

 

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BVC LOOKS FOR A FEW GOOD VOLUNTEERS FOR SUMMER

by Jessica Ellis

Daily Cougar Staff

Border Volunteer Corps is looking for a few good people to serve border communities in Arizona, New Mexico and California for the 1995-96 service year.

The Volunteer Corps addresses critical issues including health and housing, adult and child education and the environment.

The BVC is a grass-roots national service program based in Tucson, Ariz. As one of the largest AmeriCorps programs, the BVC addresses critical issues in this region where the cultures of the United States, Indian Nations and Mexico come together.

BVC Corpsmembers serve with community-based non-profit organizations and government agencies who have developed BVC Partnership Projects.

"This is not a job. ... Border Volunteer Corpsmembers commit 10 months of their lives to national service addressing critical issues in U.S. and Indian Nation communities bordering Mexico," said Issa Carrazco, Corps recruitment coordinator.

"Corpsmembers experience the satisfaction of service, transforming communities and helping others," Carrazco said.

Corpsmembers receive a living allowance of $7,945, health care benefits and child care, if eligible. Upon completion of their service commitment, Corpsmembers are eligible for a post-service educational benefit of $4,725 to pay student loans or future educational expenses.

The Border service year begins in late September and concludes in early August.

BVC applicants must be at least 17 years of age, have a high school diploma/G.E.D. and be a U.S. citizen or permanent U.S. resident.

The volunteer group strives to:

•get things done by addressing local critical needs through team-based, direct service projects that are developed with local community members.

•strengthen communities by bringing together people of diverse backgrounds for a common goal of service through the development of local partnerships and collaborations.

•encourage responsibility and civic involvement among Corpsmembers toward their families, their community and their country.

•expand opportunity through personal professional development, skill-building and post-service educational award.

The BVC is part of the AmeriCorps National Service Network of more than 350 community service programs nationwide.

The BVC is sponsored by the Arizona-Mexico Commission and is funded by a $2.6 million grant from the Corporation for National Service, which administers AmeriCorps.

For an application or more information, call (800) 320-1774. Application deadline is June 1; however, applicants are interviewed and accepted on a rolling basis.

 

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JAPANESE <I>BRIDE<P> ENGAGING COMPANION

Pullquote: The movie is poignant and beautiful in its attention to detail, from the dewdrops on the flowers to the rush of a nearby waterfall. A quiet sense of the supernatural appears, such as when Riyo and Kana are doing laundry and witness the "wind of God."

Japanese film <I>Picture Bride<P>, starring Youki Kudoh and Akira Takayama, is worth a thousand words.

Photo by /

by Joey Guerra

Daily Cougar Staff

Today, the act of marriage can only be entered into with trust, a sense of familiarity and love. It is unthinkable to marry someone you hardly know. (Well, almost unthinkable.) Nevertheless, this sacred bond is ludicrous without the aforementioned qualities.

Imagine what it would be like to leave home for a foreign land in order to marry someone you know only by a picture and a single letter! This is the premise for <I>Picture Bride<P>, a moving portrait of one young Japanese girl's experience, enhanced by lush cinematography and an underlying spirituality.

The year is 1918, and the film begins with Riyo (Youki Kudoh) preparing to leave for Hawaii, where she will live with her new husband, Matsuji (Akira Takayama). Riyo is reluctant to leave home not only because of the situation, but also because of a dark secret connected to her parents' death. She cannot confess for fear of losing her opportunity in Hawaii.

When she arrives there, Riyo is shocked to discover her husband's picture is different from his present appearance. Matsuji is an elderly man (43!), and the handsome youth in the picture has all but vanished. Riyo reacts with immediate coldness, refusing to consummate the marriage and even prohibiting him from helping her off a wagon.

Riyo settles uncomfortably into life, working in the sugar cane fields with her husband and the other Japanese residents. She befriends Kana (the beautiful Tamlyn Tomita, last seen in <I>The Joy Luck Club<P>), a fellow worker with a strong spirit. Together, they make life a little easier for one another, even though Riyo is seen as a "city girl" by the other workers.

The movie is poignant and beautiful in its attention to detail, from the dewdrops on the flowers to the rush of a nearby waterfall. A quiet sense of the supernatural appears, such as when Riyo and Kana are doing laundry and witness the "wind of God." The relationship that develops between the two women is beautiful and serves as a strong support for the rest of the movie. Tragically, their friendship is cut short by a horrible accident involving a fire in the field, leaving Riyo alone once again.

As it progresses, the movie illustrates how Riyo learns to understand her husband and sees that he is not a bad person. They forge an intimate, caring bond that is ended all too soon, not by another tragedy but because the movie ends!

That is my one major complaint -- the length of the movie. While director Kayo Hatta has a slow, leisurely-paced way of organizing his picture, it comes to an end much too quickly. The movie clocks in at less than one-and-a-half hours, and while it isn't a bad ending, it does come abruptly. I thought maybe it was just an intermission, and I was waiting for more of this beautifully woven story. A few questions were left unanswered, and I would like to have seen how Riyo's relationship with Matsuji turns out.

Nonetheless, <I>Picture Bride<P>'s highs outweigh its lows by a long shot. As mentioned, the movie looks great and the direction is excellent. The actors also do great jobs with their roles. As Riyo, Kudoh is serene and silently beautiful, a young girl quickly learning the responsibilities of being a woman. Takayama also gives a solid performance as Matsuji, the ever-devoted husband. While he comes across as a bit of a lush at first, he soon becomes a likable character who only wants the love of his wife. Tomita also does a wonderful job as Kana, Riyo's friend for an all-too-brief amount of time. Her naturalism and ease with the role make you wish she was on the screen longer.

All in all, <I>Picture Bride<P> is a wonderful little movie. It's these types of films that make you realize how many other great movies come from foreign countries that are often overlooked, like <I>Farewell My Concubine<P> or <I>Cronos<P>, both of which had limited runs in Houston. Take a break from big-budget monstrosities at your local movie theater and head over to Greenway 3, where the movie is playing exclusively. This <I>Picture<P> is definitely worth a thousand words.

<I>Picture Bride<P>

Stars: Youki Kudoh, Akira Takayama

Director: Kayo Hatta

*** stars

 

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VAN HALEN KEEPS ITS <I>BALANCE<P> AFTER 19 YEARS

Photo by Bob Sebree/Warner Bros

Although not a spectacular album, Van Halen's latest release, <I>Balance<P>, does not disappoint its fans.

by Ryan Carssow

Contributing writer

Van Halen fans were beginning to think it could never happen. Through nine studio albums, a live double-CD and a change in frontmen – to aging Sammy Hagar from wild child David Lee Roth – the legendary, Grammy award-winning Los Angeles-based hard rock quartet had never put out a bad album in 19 years.

Until now.

The release of its 10th studio album, <I>Balance<P>, marks the first undoubtedly sub-par effort from the VH guys: Hagar; guitarist-keyboardist and virtuoso Eddie Van Halen; underrated drummer Alex Van Halen; and ever-steady Michael Anthony, who continues to be a master of staying out of the way of his more talented bandmates.

The band shows its age (most of the members are past or approaching the big 40) and, perhaps, its boredom and complacency with numerous lackluster tracks. Some of the song titles – "Can't Stop Lovin' You," "Don't Tell Me (What Love Can Do)," "Feelin' and Aftershock" – offer good foreshadowing of the contentment Van Halen has found in the world of trite radio-rock with this release. Songs worthy of the Van Halen name are few and far between, but, at least, leave hope that the band is not totally dead.

"Amsterdam" is by far the best track on the CD. It is hard-hitting rock, in the class of Van Halen's classics. But, the song's lyrics have obvious references to marijuana use, a favorite topic of Hagar's during live shows, which could present a headache for the band. The Red Rocker starts the song off by shouting, "Light 'em up!" and the chorus is, "A quick stop by the bulldog/Score me some Panama Red/Wham, bam, oh Amsterdam/Stone you like nothin' else can." MTV executives have hinted that the lyrics will have to be altered in the song's video, which has already been shot on-location in Amsterdam. This is reminiscent of the music network's bleeping of the word "joint" from the recent Tom Petty video, "You Don't Know how it Feels."

During the Houston stop on the nationwide Balance tour, a production equally as lame as this album, Hagar declared, before singing "Amsterdam," that Van Halen wouldn't bow to the whims of the MTV censors. What he might be forgetting, however, is the enormous success, critical acclaim and popularity Van Halen's last MTV video, "Right Now" from the <I>For Unlawful Carnal Knowledge<P> CD, generated for the band.

Three other tracks from <I>Balance<P> make the cut as true VH-caliber efforts. "Big Fat Money" packs the band's signature high-voltage, guitar-screeching fun, but is brought down slightly by its irritating resemblance to old Hagar solo efforts, especially the opening – "Some say money is bad for the soul/bad for the rock, bad for the roll/bad for the heart, bad for the brain/bad for damn near everything, oh yeah!"

"Not Enough," with a piano number from Eddie, has all the ingredients of a good, slow ballad -- something the band has attempted, but never accomplished, numerous times in the past. Ed, the guitar god that he is, returns to his rightful six-stringer in the instrumental, "Baluchitherium." This piece, another welcome return of Van Halen instrumentals that came back with the last studio album after a three-album hiatus, has the definite bluesy quality that defines Eddie's signature "greasy sound."

Eddie and Alex's playing is what you'd expect throughout, given the CD's limitations. Anthony, again, doesn't get in the way, and Hagar is his old good-but-not-as-good-as-he-thinks-he-is self. Perhaps the album is too <I>Balance<P>d for its own good; it never goes flying off the proverbial cliff, landing solidly on both feet like the last 19 years of Van Halen albums have led fans to expect.

 

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ROCKETS' MAGIC PACES SPURS IN NBA PLAY-OFFS

by Robert M. Luka

Daily Cougar Staff

Before the 1994-95 NBA campaign ever began, the experts (or was it Orlando fans?) were calling this the "Magical season." Regardless of who or what these seers were referring to, they were dead on. Now in the midst of the East and West Conference Finals, some are arguing that this year's play-offs may be the best ever, thanks in large part to our own Houston Rockets.

This year's team has given new meaning to the phrase "Clutch City" while making Rudy Tomjanovich look like the best coach in NBA history. Rudy T's record while facing play-off elimination now stands at 10-1, including a 5-0 run this year.

So if you're worried about the Rockets having dropped two straight games at home against the Spurs, don't be. The so-called home-court advantage has been nonexistent thus far in the series, and the Rockets have shown that they play better with their backs against the wall. They still have two games to regain the confidence and poise that helped guide them back from 2-1 and 3-1 deficits against Utah and Phoenix, respectively.

Incidentally, in coming back from that 3-1 deficit against the Suns, the Rockets became the first team since the 1982 Philadelphia 76'ers to win games five, six, and seven to take a best-of-seven series. The Indiana Pacers almost allowed the Knicks to become the second, but they held on in New York to take that series 4-3.

As of press time, we find the Spurs and Rockets deadlocked at two games apiece. The entire season has come to a best of three to see who advances to the NBA finals. Looking to the Eastern Conference Finals is more like looking in the mirror: We find the Orlando Magic and the Indiana Pacers knotted at two after yet another exciting Indiana victory Monday. Unless the Magic and Spurs meet in the finals, look for Reggie Miller of the Pacers or UH alumnus Hakeem "The Dream" Olajuwon, rewarded for their own magic by being voted MVP of the play-offs. Should a Houston-Indiana matchup occur, I predictably give Hakeem the edge. Of course, as this year's play-offs have already shown, everything is truly up in the air at this point.

 

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NEW EDITOR TAKES PLUNGE

by Dominic Corva

Daily Cougar Staff

Welcome back, sports fans. Harry Carrey here ...

Actually, it's just me, your new (read: raw and hard-up for column ideas) and short-term summer sports editor. If it was good ol' Harry, at least I'd be drunk and woozy. Hmmmm. Drunk and woozy... a light bulb flashes over my inexperienced head! Drunk and woozy will be the name of my column, and (oh! joy!) I can write about anything I want! I'm the sports editor of The Daily Cougar! I can do anything I want! Aaaaghh! I'm GOD!

What's that, Dan? What are you doing, Dan? Get that needle away from me -- I'm the sports editor! Aaagh!

Whoa, I'm okay now. In fact, I'm feeling pretty good. Perhaps I should ... yes, I'll write about sports.

University of Houston 4.0 student and breast-stroke specialist Nicola Clegg has been named to the GTE District VI Academic All-America Women's team, composed of student-athletes from six states. With this honor, the South African native advances to consideration for the national GTE Academic All-America team.

Other random Cougar sports notes include the signing of Baytown discus thrower Katie Herndon. She happens to be the little sister of outstanding Cougar offensive lineman Jimmy Herndon, a SWC Academic All-American and all-around model citizen.

In golf, seniors Anders Hanson and junior Lance Combrink lead the 14th-ranked Cougars into the 1995 NCAA Championships at the Scarlet course in Columbus, Ohio. They will be trying to upset favorite Oklahoma State.

That's all for now. See you in the next psychotic episode ... .

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STILL GOING: NOTHING OUTLASTS NCAAS

COUGARS COMPETE FOR CHAMPIONSHIPS

BY M. S. AMEEN

Daily Cougar Staff

 

As the rest of University of Houston students are shuffling back to class for summer school, the men's and women's track teams are finishing their season.

The handful of Cougar athletes who qualified for the NCAA Championships are in Knoxville, Tenn., today through June 4 in hopes of gaining national titles.

On the collegiate level, track season ends this weekend with the Championships. Houston will be well-represented, but don't expect a team championship as both the men and the women lack the depth necessary for scoring a lot of points.

However, individual titles are a strong possibility for those members who will compete.

Junior transfer Michael Hoffer will be the first Cougar to compete when the first five events of the decathlon take place tonight. Hoffer, a native of Sweden, qualified for the Championships March 17 in College Station when he finished third at the first meet of the outdoor season.

In that meet Hoffer finished ahead of the 1994 Southwest Conference champion, Richard Harrison of Texas A&M.

The remaining Cougars represent what could be considered Houston's meat and potatoes. The sprints and long jump have supplied the majority of head coach Tom Tellez's success over the years.

Both the men's and women's 4x100 meter relay teams qualified for the Championships. Shedric Fields, Eric Hayes, Isaac Bell and Ubeja Anderson will make up the foursome.

The women's team will be comprised of Janine Courville, Cynthia Jackson, DeAngelia Johnson and DeMonica Davis.

With help from volunteer coaches and Olympians Carl Lewis and Leroy Burrell, the relay teams should make a strong showing.

One of the best hurdlers in the SWC, Anderson will also compete in the 110 meter hurdles despite suffering from a foot injury for the majority of the outdoor season.

Vincenzo Cox will run in the 400 meter hurdles, which he qualified for less than two weeks ago at the Mizuno Invitational held in Robertson Stadium.

A staple on the UH track team, Fields will also compete in the long jump, his best event. Again, he'll be tangling with cross-town rival Kareem Street-Thompson of Rice.

Two members of the women's relay team, Courville and Davis, qualified for the women's 100 meters as well.

The women also have a long jumper with a chance at winning big. Dawn Burrell, sister of the Olympian, will hopefully continue her success since her appearance at the Pan American Games this past March.

If all goes well, the men's team will end up with 50 points Sunday, and the women will show a score of 38. It won't mean a national championship for either, but regardless of the score, Houston can be confident that Cougar athletes make a good showing.

 

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NEW EDITOR TAKES PLUNGE

by Dominic Corva

Daily Cougar Staff

Welcome back, sports fans. Harry Caray here ...

Actually, it's just me, your new (read: raw and hard-up for column ideas) and short-term summer sports editor. If it was good ol' Harry, at least I'd be drunk and woozy. Hmmmm. Drunk and woozy... a light bulb flashes over my inexperienced head! Drunk and woozy will be the name of my column, and (oh! joy!) I can write about anything I want! I'm the sports editor of The Daily Cougar! I can do anything I want! Aaaaghh! I'm GOD!

What's that, Dan? What are you doing, Dan? Get that needle away from me -- I'm the sports editor! Aaagh!

Whoa, I'm okay now. In fact, I'm feeling pretty good. Perhaps I should ... yes, I'll write about sports.

University of Houston 4.0 student and breast-stroke specialist Nicola Clegg has been named to the GTE District VI Academic All-America Women's team, composed of student-athletes from six states. With this honor, the South African native advances to consideration for the national GTE Academic All-America team.

Other random Cougar sports notes include the signing of Baytown discus thrower Katie Herndon. She happens to be the little sister of outstanding Cougar offensive lineman Jimmy Herndon, a SWC Academic All-American and all-around model citizen.

In golf, seniors Anders Hanson and junior Lance Combrink lead the 14th-ranked Cougars into the 1995 NCAA Championships at the Scarlet course in Columbus, Ohio. They will be trying to upset favorite Oklahoma State.

That's all for now. See you in the next psychotic episode ... .

 

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