R. CULLEN BUILDING UNDER SURGICAL KNIFE THIS SUMMER

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT AWAITS NEW HOME

by Niki Purcell

Daily Cougar Staff

The English Department, including some summer classes, has been relocated to the Fouke Building as the Roy G. Cullen Building begins to undergo major structural renovations.

"It feels like summer camp," said Harmon Boertien, chair of the English Department. "We have settled into our new home reasonably well. We are not looking forward to the move back (to Cullen), but we're looking forward to having newly renovated offices and classrooms when we do."

Howard Rose, manager of building and grounds maintenance, said Tuesday that an outside contractor has been hired to perform updates, like installing an emergency generator, renovating the air conditioning and lighting systems, replacing rusted windows and installing new water and sewer pipes.

"(UH) has been updating (Cullen) as school funds become available," Rose said. "When the building was built, it met all the codes. Once the updates are completed, it will now meet today's codes."

The water and sewer pipes are coated with asbestos, a material common to Cullen's construction period.

"We are in the process of abating the pipes (of asbestos), then we will remove them and replace them with new, up-to-date ones," Rose said.

The Fouke Building, better known as the old athletic building, is located next to Hofheinz Pavilion and has the word "Cougars" on the side in red paint.

A few intensive-language non-credit English classes are being taught in Fouke. The remaining summer English classes are scattered throughout other campus buildings.

"We are having to walk all over campus to teach classes," Boertien said. "In Cullen, we didn't have to do this because everything was right there. Now we are getting a lot of exercise walking."

The Roy Gustav Cullen Building, dedicated on June 4, 1939, is the original building the entire UH campus was housed in and is now the oldest building on campus.

Boertien, his staff and the English classes are scheduled to return to Cullen around August 14.

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POWER PLANT FIRE POSSIBLY IGNITED BY CIGARETTE

by James Aldridge

Daily Cougar Staff

Arson investigators at the Houston Fire Department say the fire that occurred at the power plant May 26 could have been fueled by the spark of a cigarette, but Marcel Blanchard, Physical Plant director, believes the fire originated from a spark ignited from natural gas, not from a cigarette.

At 12:30 p.m., cooling tower No. 3's top deck caught fire, causing the air conditioning to go out in several buildings on campus. No one was injured.

When four units of the Houston Fire Department arrived at 1:10 p.m., the plant was evacuated and the natural gas line, the boiler and the steam turner were shut off. By 2:15 p.m., the fire was out, Blanchard said.

Bob Bowden, of the Environmental and Physical Safety Department on campus, said there was no reason to evacuate any other building on campus.

Blanchard said because the plant uses petroleum to power the plant, oil could have spilled and perhaps ignited in the heat. Investigator Fred Moore said one possible cause of the fire could have been a burn-out of the tower's motor causing a spark. Another possibility could have been a fan brushing a spark from a cigarette. Cigarette butts were present at the scene, Moore said.

When asked of the possibility of arson, Moore said, "No, not to my knowledge. More than likely, it was an accidental fire."

No further action is resulting from the investigation.

Blanchard said the fire caused about $30,000- to $35,000- worth of damage but did not cause major damage to the plant itself, except for one boiler.

The details of the fire are contained in a UHPD Information Report, which is filed when non-criminal events occur. Information reports are not open to the public because they do not fall under the Texas Open Records Act, UHPD Lt. Malcolm Davis said.

The reason why the fire did not affect the whole campus is because the power plant has reserve capacity, meaning at least one cooling tower is not being used at a given time to conduct maintenance and repairs on that spare. When cooling tower No. 3 was damaged, the plant was able to use its standby tower, Blanchard said.

Once the fire alarms rang, Blanchard, Stationary Engineer Bill Bradley, Operations Foreman Peter Amadi and Jeff Brown were among the first to spot the fire. The staff members ran to the site with fire extinguishers and did whatever they could before the fire department arrived. Brown said fire axes had to be used to fully reach the fire and extinguish it.

A cooling tower cools large quantities of water, carrying waste heat from central air conditioning systems, power stations or industrial plants by spraying water into air passing through the tower. Once evaporation occurs, the temperature of the leftover water decreases.

The decks aid evaporation by spraying water inside the tower and increasing the surface area of the water for evaporation. The waste water is then captured and flows into a condenser.

Although Blanchard said most cooling towers are wooden, the Academic American Encyclopedia, 1994, says most cooling towers are usually made of brick or concrete.

Ronald Windham, a firefighter and a dispatcher with the Houston Fire Department said concrete cooling towers are the best at preventing fires while wooden cooling towers are the worst.

 

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REGENTS SEEK ANSWER

TO UH SYSTEM DISCORD

by James V. Geluso

Daily Cougar Staff

The University of Houston System Board of Regents, meeting in a special session Friday, received the final report of an audit panel commissioned to review UH System management practices, and officially accepted the resignations of UH System Chancellor Alexander Schilt, UH-Main Campus President James H. Pickering and UH-Victoria President Lesta Turchen.

Board of Regents Chairwoman Wilhemina "Beth" Morian announced that interim appointments would be made to fill the vacant positions at the next board meeting, scheduled for June 22.

The resignations of Schilt, Pickering and Turchen, as well as the resignations of Henry Trueba, UH senior vice president and provost, and Dennis Boyd, UH senior vice president for Administration and Finance, are effective August 31.

Morian also said national searches would be conducted for all the positions, but no permanent appointments would be made until a study is completed to determine which of the management audit report's options the System should follow.

The final report suggests four options for dealing with what it called "a significant amount of discord within the UH System." The options range from a "transition option," which would preserve the current structure while studies were carried out, to a chief executive officer model that would merge the position of UH System chancellor with the position of UH president.

The four options suggested by the report include an altered version of the present structure, which would include an Advisory Council of Presidents and a Systemwide Faculty Senate; a transition option that would focus on a number of studies; a single CEO model, consolidating the positions of chancellor and UH president; and a coordinating entity model for the System administration, which would replace the chancellor with an executive director.

The report also recommends eight studies of the System administration that should be undertaken.

The board discussed the resignations and the report in closed session, but barely referred to the report during public remarks following the executive session.

Reading from a prepared statement, Morian aimed a thinly veiled shot at a UH faculty group known as the Coalition for Excellence, which "believes that consolidation of the offices of chancellor and UH president by itself will ensure that this university System will function at its best."

Morian stressed that "the missions of the three smaller universities are essential" and said the board "must safeguard the integrity and success" of those campuses.

Quoting a public statement she made during the last week of May, Morian said, "It is not our intention to settle immediately the various questions about the future configuration of the UH System. They are weighty questions, and too much depends on how we answer them to act with haste."

Morian also said the board is very interested in centralizing the business side of System/campus functions and reducing duplicative functions.

Regent John O'Quinn joined Morian in contending that the regents are not trying to "micromanage" the universities.

"I want to assure everyone that attitude (of the board) is constantly what is in the best interest of the University of Houston in general," O'Quinn said.

Among those attending the meeting was a large group from UH-Downtown, whose Faculty Senate meeting Thursday was characterized by one observer as "another South Carolina threatening to secede" after the assembly passed a resolution threatening to push to break away from the UH System if control of the System was moved to the main campus.

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SOMETHING FOR NOTHING

MANY ITEMS AND INFORMATION AVAILABLE -- FREE OF CHARGE

by Valérie C. Fouché

Daily Cougar Staff

It's not very often that someone offers you something for nothing, right? Something of value, that is.

Recently, while digging through my mail, I discovered quite a few items you can request absolutely free of charge -- all you have to do for many of these items is make a toll-free call and ask for the stuff.

I decided to share this list with my fellow UH Coogs, and I hope some of you are able to actually use some of these tidbits (ranging from free information for allergy sufferers to tips on how to handle your meat and poultry).

•"Math Anxiety, No Problem!" -- a free brochure authored by Sheila Tobias -- is available at Sylvan Learning Centers nationwide. Call 1-800-EDUCATE.

•For information about Flagship Funds and free current prospectus call 1-800-414-7447.

•Sneezing your head off in Houston? Join the club. A free tip sheet, "15 Steps for Reducing Allergy and Asthma Suffering," is available by calling Nilfisk of America Inc. at 1-800-241-9420, ext. 2 for Customer Service.

•Do you know how much fat is in a McDonald's Big Mac? Why not find out? For a free "Hidden Fat in the American Diet" brochure, send your name and address to: Chromium Education Bureau, 6863 Friars Road, San Diego, CA 92108.

•For information about PhotoPals, a new program that helps students focus on their creativity through photography, call Fuji Film at 1-800-817-2200.

•For free information about the National Mining Association, write to: 1130 17th St. N.W., eighth floor -- Dept. NAPS, Washington, DC 20036-4677.

•For a free guide (in English or Spanish) for people with prostate problems, call the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, at 1-800-358-9295.

•For reservations or an informational brochure about Signature Inns and business or family travel, call 1-800-822-5252.

•For free information about the skin condition known as rosacea, write to the National Rosacea Society, 220 S. Cook St., Suite 201, Barrington, IL 60010.

•For facts about a personal financial planning software program, call Ernst & Young LLP at 1-800-2-PROSPER.

•You can get recycling information and more for free in a handy brochure, "Buy Recycled -- and Save: An Everyday Shopping Guide," by writing to: McDonald's Department of Environmental Affairs, 1 E. Wacker Drive, Suite 1600, Chicago, IL 60601.

•For a free brochure about outpatient endoscopic lumbar discectomy, call 1-800-95-NOPAIN.

•To learn about the DocuWare Pressman home computer scanning system, call Alos Micrographics at 1-800-431-7105.

•For more information about aspirin, write or call for a free brochure, "Myths and Facts About Aspirin," Bayer Corporation, P.O. Box 1088, Grand Rapids, MN 55745-1088, or call 1-800-332-2253.

•Need help getting your filing system in order? For a free brochure on filing system efficiency, as well as other office product help, call TAB at 1-800-676-3109, Ext. 3483.

•Interested in how you can feel better without using the standard over-the-counter or prescription drugs? For a free copy of a monthly newsletter about alternative medicine, write to: Digest, P.O. Box K, Milton, WA 98354.

•For information about the "Cleanse, Burn, Build Diet Program" and products and for the names of nearby distributors, call Enrich Internation at 1-800-748-8288.

•For free brochures about pool cleaning, call 1-800-374-4700, or write to Kreepy Krauly USA Inc., 13801 N.W. Fourth St., Sunrise, FL 33325-9988.

•To reduce home maintenance, call for a free brochure on a new gutter and leader system that virtually eliminates gutter cleaning, call 1-800-420-7246.

•For allergy tips and general allergy information from Marion Merrell Dow Inc., maker of anti-allergy products, call 1-800-593-3141.

•Don't let those painful headaches get you down -- send a self-addressed, business letter-sized envelope with three first-class stamps affixed to: The National Headache Foundation, 5252 N. Western Ave., Chicago, IL 60625. Ask for a complementary copy of the NHF Head Lines, a quarterly newsletter and brochure that educates headache sufferers.

•Doubts about your meat? Call the United States Department of Agriculture Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-800-535-4555 for tips on food handling and food safety.

•To receive a free brochure titled "Parents and Stress" from the IOF Foresters, one of the world's oldest and largest fraternal benefit societies that has been active in the fight against child abuse for more than a decade, call 1-800-922-4-IOF.

•Looking for a summer job, but not having much luck? For a free brochure with tips on job interviewing, call Day Runner at 1-800-232-9786, Ext. 3149.

 

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RUDY TAILORS ROCKETS TO A T

by Corin R. Hoggard

Daily Cougar Staff

The numbers keep adding up: three 40-point games from Hakeem Olajuwon, superb 3-point shooting and fourth-quarter comebacks have combined to send this crowded bandwagon speeding like a 100 mile-per-hour Nolan Ryan heater.

If by some massive oversight, anyone has not jumped aboard, thumb a ride now; reservations can be made now for the next stop on the Express, Florida. The best bald athletes in Texas will be in Orlando invading the Magic's kingdom, and after the series they'll all be going to Disney World, provided they can locate a sober driver.

The sweet music coming from Clyde's glide, freakish harmony from perimeter players and new big man Robert Horry and the original Texas superconductor follow Allah to their destiny, the 1995 NBA Championship.

The Rockets approach the NBA finals as the game's hottest team, and it has become abundantly apparent that a mistrial occurred in the MVP selection. The defense and offense rest. Olajuwon boasts a 33 point-per-game average to go with 10 rebounds, four assists and three blocks, far and away the strongest statistics in the league. He simply will not allow the Rockets to lose. Clyde Drexler articulated it for all when he asserted, "I've never seen anybody on this planet play as well as this guy. He's phenomenal."

As much respect as the Rockets and Olajuwon have received during this second-stretch run, many overlook another defending champion unjustly dethroned: Rudy Tomjanovich has done absolutely nothing wrong. From the sentimental but controversial gift he presented to our city and our university on Valentine's Day (Drexler) to the crucial decisions through the playoffs, Rudy T has presented his case, receiving just the amount of recognition he sought -- none! This year, Bob Hill led his Spurs to the NBA's best record, and Del Harris' Lakers improved more than any other team, giving them the prominence Rudy avoids. Last year's coach of the year turned Robert Horry into a dominant playoff big man, manipulated lineups when adjustments were necessary for victories, organized an amicable chemotherapy for Vernon Maxwell, the team cancer, and instilled amazing confidence in each player. Horry's defense and clutch shooting are critical pieces to the jigsaw puzzle Tomjanovich is so close to finishing. Summing up the Rockets' focus and confidence, Horry points out that "deep down, in the back of our minds, we always felt we could make it back to the finals. We believed!"

They believe in their own abilities, Hakeem's superpowers, and Rudy T's agenda, which has them gelling at the absolute perfect moment. If you're scoring at home, mark Olajuwon MVP, credit Tomjanovich with Coach of the Year, and enjoy following the Rockets' red glare streak to the only title the "experts" can't wrest from them.

 

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COUGARS TRACK AND FIELD RUNS OUT OF GAS

by M. S. Ameen

Daily Cougar Staff

Despite suffering an early setback when decathlete Michael Hoffer fouled out of the long jump on the first day of competition, the Houston Cougars men's track team managed a respectable 19th-place finish in the NCAA Outdoor Championships last weekend.

Junior Ubeja Anderson led the way with a third-place finish in the 110 meter hurdles. He clocked a cool 13.51 seconds, .19 behind winner Duane Ross of Clemson.

The 4x100 relay team -- Anderson, junior Sheddric Fields, sophomore Isaac Bell, and freshman Eric Hayes -- recorded a season best 39.37 as they finished seventh. Texas Christian took first.

Fields supplied the remaining points when he landed a sixth-place mark of 25 feet, three-fourths inch in the long jump. Rice's Kareem Street-Thompson captured the title spot.

Arkansas scored 61 1/2 points to capture its fourth consecutive men's title. The Razorbacks edged out the UCLA men, who scored 55. Houston scored 11.

The Southeastern Conference dominance in track and field carried over into women's competition as well: Louisiana State secured its ninth consecutive women's title this year.

Despite the excellent efforts of seniors Dawn Burrell (long jump), Cynthia Jackson (4x100 meter relay), De'Angelia Johnson( 4x100), and juniors DeMonica Davis (100 meters, 4x100) and Janine Courville (100, 4x100), the Houston women were unable to score enough points to place in the top 25.

There will be another chance for some of the Houston tracksters to compete at the USA Track and Field Championships, which take place June 13-17 in Sacramento, Calif. Volunteer Cougar coach Carl Lewis will also be there, competing in the Long Jump and the 100 meter dash.

 

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COUGARS TRACK AND FIELD RUNS OUT OF GAS

by M. S. Ameen

Daily Cougar Staff

Despite suffering an early setback when decathlete Michael Hoffer fouled out of the long jump on the first day of competition, the Houston Cougars men's track team managed a respectable 19th-place finish in the NCAA Outdoor Championships last weekend.

Junior Ubeja Anderson led the way with a third-place finish in the 110 meter hurdles. He clocked a cool 13.51 seconds, .19 behind winner Duane Ross of Clemson.

The 4x100 relay team -- Anderson, junior Sheddric Fields, sophomore Isaac Bell, and freshman Eric Hayes -- recorded a season best 39.37 as they finished seventh. Texas Christian took first.

Fields supplied the remaining points when he landed a sixth-place mark of 25 feet, three-fourths inch in the long jump. Rice's Kareem Street-Thompson captured the title spot.

Arkansas scored 61 1/2 points to capture its fourth consecutive men's title. The Razorbacks edged out the UCLA men, who scored 55. Houston scored 11.

The Southeastern Conference dominance in track and field carried over into women's competition as well: Louisiana State secured its ninth consecutive women's title this year.

Despite the excellent efforts of seniors Dawn Burrell (long jump), Cynthia Jackson (4x100 meter relay), De'Angelia Johnson( 4x100), and juniors DeMonica Davis (100 meters, 4x100) and Janine Courville (100, 4x100), the Houston women were unable to score enough points to place in the top 25.

There will be another chance for some of the Houston tracksters to compete at the USA Track and Field Championships, which take place June 13-17 in Sacramento, Calif. Volunteer Cougar coach Carl Lewis will also be there, competing in the Long Jump and the 100 meter dash.

 

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HOUSTON GOLF, TRACK FINISH NO FLOURISH

GOLFERS' SECOND-ROUND SWING SAVES DAY AT SCARLET

by M. S. Ameen

Daily Cougar Staff

The forecast was dismal for both the weather and the Houston golf team as it headed into Thursday's second round of the NCAA Golf Championships in 24th place.

However, the Cougars staved off elimination in the second round and moved into a tie for third by scoring a combined 280, 10 strokes ahead of any other team.

The 30-team field was cut to 15 for the final two rounds. Senior Anders Hansen and Chris Borgen, juniors Lance Combrink and Shawn Savage, and freshman Jeff Burns made up the Houston team that slushed across Ohio State's Scarlet Course in Columbus.

Houston slipped to ninth after the third round and ended up finishing in the 14th spot, five places higher than last year's finish.

No. 1 Oklahoma State and No. 2 Stanford ended in a tie after the four-round tournament. The first team playoff ever in the 98-year history of the NCAA Championships gave OSU its eighth national title.

The Cowboys had to play with the minimum amount of players (four), but defeated the Cardinals on the first playoff hole. The University of Texas finished third.

In the individual competition, Hansen rode as high as fourth place after the third round, but was forced out of contention for the title when he shot a 77 on the final 18. He finished 21st.

Chip Spratlin of Auburn won the individual championship, edging the rest of the leaders by one stroke. Outstanding Stanford freshman and reigning U.S. Amateur Champion, Tiger Woods, struggled in the early rounds but managed to finish tied for fifth.

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CROSS OVER TO <I>BRIDGES<P> FOR TOUCHING ROMANCE

Pullquote: "Something this certain only comes along once in a lifetime," Robert says.

<I>The Bridges of Madison County<P>

Stars: Clint Eastwood, Meryl Streep

Director: Clint Eastwood

4 stars

Meryl Streep and Clint Eastwood star in <I>The Bridges of Madison County<P>, the romantic drama based on a true story.

Photo by Ken Regan/Warner Bros.

by Jenalia Moreno

Daily Cougar Staff

Few romantic films are successful, because most rely on the cute factor. Boy meets girl, boy loses girl, boy says funny line, does something unpredictable and the credits roll. Most of these cute films are unrealistic and leave the audience feeling ill from all the cheesy lines.

However, Warner Bros.' release, <I>The Bridges of Madison County<P>, starring Oscar winners Meryl Streep and Clint Eastwood, is different. <I>Bridges<P> is a romantic drama in the style of many 1940s and '50s films. Sure, there are a few funny, even cute, moments in the film, but basically it is a tear-jerking love story. The film is directed by Clint Eastwood and is based on the novel of the same name written by Robert James Waller.

Waller's novel, which is a true account of the four days shared by a housewife and National Geographic photographer, has been highly criticized by many, but has managed to stay on the New York Times best seller list for several weeks. The film sticks to the novel, with a few added improvements, and is nothing short of wonderful.

The film begins when Streep's character, Francesca Johnson, dies and her two middle-aged children (played by Annie Corley and Victor Slezak) come home to bury their mother. What they find when they go through her belongings is something that makes them rethink their own lives.

They discover that in 1965 their mother had an affair with Robert Kincaid (Eastwood), a photographer sent to the sleepy town of Winterset, Iowa, to photograph its picturesque covered bridges.

Most of the film is told using flashbacks from Francesca's point of view. Francesca is a housewife from a small village in Italy who has spent the last 15 years of her marriage watching her life pass her by. When Robert asks her about her husband, all she can say is, "He's very clean."

So when she meets Robert, someone who has spent his whole life traveling the world, she sees what she has been missing out on in life. Robert insists he needs no one in his life, no home base; however, he finds himself falling in love with Francesca and is even willing to give up his solitary life so he can be with her.

"Something this certain only comes along once in a lifetime," Robert says. The life-long love that these two people share is heart-wrenching. Even near their death, they think only of one another.

<I>The Bridges of Madison County<P> could not have been a better picture. Eastwood again uses the shadowy lighting techniques, which he employed in his directorial debut, <I>Play Misty For Me<P>, in <I>Bridges<P>. Thanks to the lighting, the 1965 flashback scenes between Streep and Eastwood are quite realistic.

Director of Photography Jack N. Green did an outstanding job in <I>Bridges<P> not only on the flashback scenes, but also on the scenes in which Eastwood's character was photographing the beautiful Iowa bridges.

Streep and Eastwood put on incredible performances, and Streep's Italian accent and mannerisms seem accurate and don't grate on your nerves like many other actors playing Italians (Nick Nolte, <I>Lorenzo's Oil<P>, for example).

Eastwood again outdoes himself as a director, making a nearly flawless film. What seems even more impressive about this film is that it took only six weeks to complete, whereas other films take months.

So, if you like romantic dramas and don't mind hearing an audience full of sobbing people, see <I>The Bridges of Madison County<P>, and don't forget your Kleenex.

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COUGAR ATHLETES RUN OUT OF GAS

by M. S. Ameen

Daily Cougar Staff

Despite suffering an early setback when decathlete Michael Hoffer fouled out of the long jump on the first day of competition, the Houston Cougars men's track team managed a respectable 19th-place finish in the NCAA Outdoor Championships last weekend.

Junior Ubeja Anderson led the way with a third-place finish in the 110 meter hurdles. He clocked a cool 13.51 seconds, .19 behind winner Duane Ross of Clemson.

The 4x100 relay team -- Anderson, junior Sheddric Fields, sophomore Isaac Bell, and freshman Eric Hayes -- recorded a season best 39.37 as they finished seventh. Texas Christian took first.

Fields supplied the remaining points when he landed a sixth-place mark of 25 feet, three-fourths inch in the long jump. Rice's Kareem Street-Thompson captured the title spot.

Arkansas scored 61 1/2 points to capture its fourth consecutive men's title. The Razorbacks edged out the UCLA men, who scored 55. Houston scored 11.

The Southeastern Conference dominance in track and field carried over into women's competition as well: Louisiana State secured its ninth consecutive women's title this year.

Despite the excellent efforts of seniors Dawn Burrell (long jump), Cynthia Jackson (4x100 meter relay), De'Angelia Johnson( 4x100), and juniors DeMonica Davis (100 meters, 4x100) and Janine Courville (100, 4x100), the Houston women were unable to score enough points to place in the top 25.

There will be another chance for some of the Houston tracksters to compete when the USA Track and Field Championships take place June 13-17 in Sacramento, Calif.

 

 

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