NEW CHANCELLOR SHOOTS STRAIGHT

COMMUNICATION, PROBLEM SOLVING PROVES TO BE UH'S NEXT HOBBY

by Bobby Summers

Daily Cougar Staff

University of Houston System Chancellor-designate Bill Hobby

is accustomed to leading, not following.

He apparently will not allow much time to pass before he begins leading the UH System in trying to solve the multi-faceted problems facing the university system and its campuses.

Hobby, 63, is a mixture of politician, educator and communicator. His presence invokes respect, but he clearly is a straight-shooter. Unlike many politicians, he seems to prefer action to words. He answers questions directly and to the point, leaving little or no question as to where he stands on an issue.

In an interview Wednesday at UH System headquarters on the 34th floor of the Smith Tower in downtown Houston, Hobby said, "I don't have any magic formulas. But right now, we couldn't have better people in charge than Glenn Goerke, on the main campus, and Karen Haynes, at Victoria. I think the System is in excellent hands. And by that I don't mean mine."

Seated at a large round table in a conference room overlooking a hazy panorama of West Houston, Hobby said he is not concerned with reported "rifts" between the four UH campuses.

"I'm concerned about what is going on on-campus. And that is delivering an education," Hobby said. "UH is a great institution. Its goals have not changed as long as I have been familiar with it. I think it aspires towards even greater excellence.

Hobby said UH will definitely continue to emphasize partnership programs in the future. "The university exists to serve this community. Getting input from business people and educators is very important," he said. "The University of Houston has always been a good neighbor, mindful of its duties to the surrounding community. Glenn Goerke and I are committed to continue and strengthen this tradition."

In 1992, while serving on the governing board of Rice University, Hobby was known as a critic of intercollegiate football, calling the sport "an albatross" that took money away from academics.

At a June 13 UH Board of Regents meeting, Hobby sidestepped the question of athletics, saying the regents would have to assess the future of football at UH.

Wednesday, however, he

said that money will be the bottom-line for UH football.

"I think that just pure dollar considerations have led to a decrease in the emphasis on athletics everywhere," Hobby said. "If they don't have the television money, which neither Rice nor the University of Houston is likely to have anytime soon, then to use your (the interviewer's) phrase, it is a 'money pit.' "

UH football, an activity which receives about $2.1 million in student fees, is projecting a $3.25-$3.5 million deficit this year.

Hobby is also making some long range plans for the UH System, including strategy for securing funding from the next Texas Legislature.

The former Texas Lt. Gov. stressed that the UH System will not be able to ask for hold-harmless funds from the next legislature. Hold-harmless funds are dollars appropriated by the legislature each session to help make up for losses a university system may suffer in formula funding, which in UH's case was caused by decreased enrollment.

"The University of Houston has been extremely lucky with the legislature. And I, for one, will not go back asking for hold-harmless (funds) for a third session," Hobby said. "In the first place, it will not be forthcoming."

Hobby reiterated that statement Thursday morning in an address to the UH System Board of Regents meeting at the UH Conrad Hilton Hotel.

Once again, Hobby did not waste time on platitudes or fluff. He opened his short remarks by saying, "The University of Houston faces major problems, like many other universities which must operate with fewer resources today than yesterday. Failure to address enrollment problems would prevent this university from realizing its great potential. We will not again ask the legislature for special treatment because of decreased enrollments."

Hobby also outlined major points the UH System will address in the up-coming months. He announced plans for a "Weekend College" on the UH campus, increased offerings of classes in Fort Bend County, better academic coordination, easier transfer of course credits between campuses and improved use of telecommunications.

Noting that improvement of academic coordination was one of the major concerns raised by the recent UH System Organizational Review Panel, Hobby said, "We will focus not only on how each university can strengthen its programs, but on how all our universities, working together and in partnership with others, can improve the quality of our programs and services to students and the community.

He said he has asked the four university presidents and UH System Vice Chancellor Del Felder to determine how to improve these student services.

Hobby demonstrated his no-nonsense leadership style in his closing remarks to the regents as he challenged the four campuses to be open to changes and to work for the good of the university system rather than for themselves.

"We will continue to reshape our curriculum and restructure our educational delivery system to enable us to meet the needs of Houston's diverse population," Hobby said. "Each of our four universities will seek a better balance between that the community needs and what our universities provide."

 

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NEW CHANCELLOR SHOOTS STRAIGHT

COMMUNICATION, PROBLEM SOLVING PROVES TO BE UH'S NEXT HOBBY

by Bobby Summers

Daily Cougar Staff

University of Houston System Chancellor-designate Bill Hobby

is accustomed to leading, not following.

He apparently will not allow much time to pass before he begins leading the UH System in trying to solve the multi-faceted problems facing the university system and its campuses.

Hobby, 63, is a mixture of politician, educator and communicator. His presence invokes respect, but he clearly is a straight-shooter. Unlike many politicians, he seems to prefer action to words. He answers questions directly and to the point, leaving little or no question as to where he stands on an issue.

In an interview Wednesday at UH System headquarters on the 34th floor of the Smith Tower in downtown Houston, Hobby said, "I don't have any magic formulas. But right now, we couldn't have better people in charge than Glenn Goerke, on the main campus, and Karen Haynes, at Victoria. I think the System is in excellent hands. And by that I don't mean mine."

Seated at a large round table in a conference room overlooking a hazy panorama of West Houston, Hobby said he is not concerned with reported "rifts" between the four UH campuses.

"I'm concerned about what is going on on-campus. And that is delivering an education," Hobby said. "UH is a great institution. Its goals have not changed as long as I have been familiar with it. I think it aspires towards even greater excellence.

Hobby said UH will definitely continue to emphasize partnership programs in the future. "The university exists to serve this community. Getting input from business people and educators is very important," he said. "The University of Houston has always been a good neighbor, mindful of its duties to the surrounding community. Glenn Goerke and I are committed to continue and strengthen this tradition."

In 1992, while serving on the governing board of Rice University, Hobby was known as a critic of intercollegiate football, calling the sport "an albatross" that took money away from academics.

At a June 13 UH Board of Regents meeting, Hobby sidestepped the question of athletics, saying the regents would have to assess the future of football at UH.

Wednesday, however, he

said that money will be the bottom-line for UH football.

"I think that just pure dollar considerations have led to a decrease in the emphasis on athletics everywhere," Hobby said. "If they don't have the television money, which neither Rice nor the University of Houston is likely to have anytime soon, then to use your (the interviewer's) phrase, it is a 'money pit.' "

UH football, an activity which receives about $2.1 million in student fees, is projecting a $3.25-$3.5 million deficit this year.

Hobby is also making some long range plans for the UH System, including strategy for securing funding from the next Texas Legislature.

The former Texas Lt. Gov. stressed that the UH System will not be able to ask for hold-harmless funds from the next legislature. Hold-harmless funds are dollars appropriated by the legislature each session to help make up for losses a university system may suffer in formula funding, which in UH's case was caused by decreased enrollment.

"The University of Houston has been extremely lucky with the legislature. And I, for one, will not go back asking for hold-harmless (funds) for a third session," Hobby said. "In the first place, it will not be forthcoming."

Hobby reiterated that statement Thursday morning in an address to the UH System Board of Regents meeting at the UH Conrad Hilton Hotel.

Once again, Hobby did not waste time on platitudes or fluff. He opened his short remarks by saying, "The University of Houston faces major problems, like many other universities which must operate with fewer resources today than yesterday. Failure to address enrollment problems would prevent this university from realizing its great potential. We will not again ask the legislature for special treatment because of decreased enrollments."

Hobby also outlined major points the UH System will address in the up-coming months. He announced plans for a "Weekend College" on the UH campus, increased offerings of classes in Fort Bend County, better academic coordination, easier transfer of course credits between campuses and improved use of telecommunications.

Noting that improvement of academic coordination was one of the major concerns raised by the recent UH System Organizational Review Panel, Hobby said, "We will focus not only on how each university can strengthen its programs, but on how all our universities, working together and in partnership with others, can improve the quality of our programs and services to students and the community.

He said he has asked the four university presidents and UH System Vice Chancellor Del Felder to determine how to improve these student services.

Hobby demonstrated his no-nonsense leadership style in his closing remarks to the regents as he challenged the four campuses to be open to changes and to work for the good of the university system rather than for themselves.

"We will continue to reshape our curriculum and restructure our educational delivery system to enable us to meet the needs of Houston's diverse population," Hobby said. "Each of our four universities will seek a better balance between that the community needs and what our universities provide."

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SUPERCONDUCTIVITY CENTER RECEIVES GRANT

by James V. Geluso

Senior Writer

Deputy Secretary of Energy Bill White was among the dignitaries on campus Friday to announce a $419,000 Department of Energy grant to the Texas Center for Superconductivity at UH (TCSUH).

Along with matching state funds for the grant and DOE individual awards, TCSUH will receive more than $900,000 in new funding for the next fiscal year.

This funding is in addition to the $12 million appropriated to TCSUH by the Texas Legislature in the session that ended last month.

Joining White were Reps. Gene Green and Ken Bentsen (both D-Houston), State Rep. Talmadge Heflin (R-Houston), UH President James H. Pickering, UH System Chancellor Alexander Schilt, and the incoming Chancellor-apparent, former Lt. Gov. William Hobby.

Paul Chu, the most prominent researcher at both TCSUH and UH, was there to accept the award. He cited early support from the State Legislature under Hobby's guidance, as well as support from Heflin and Houston's Congressional delegation.

White praised TCSUH as the kind of research that will have concrete, beneficial effects for society.

Chu said that developments at his laboratory will have impacts for consumers, but he couldn't say when.

"The beauty of science is its unpredictability. It's too early to tell exactly when. We will see any benefits for the consumer," he said.

 

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BIRMINGHAM BARRA-COUGARS

by Brian "Soul Train" Coltrin

Daily Cougar Staff

This year marks the inaugural season for the Canadian Football League expansion team Birmingham Barracudas. Their roster is tilted red and white, with eight former Cougar football players and head coaches.

Jimmy Klingler was recently signed by the Barra-Cougars. He will be playing quarterback for head coach Jack Pardee, former field general for both the Houston Oilers and UH Cougars.

In a sinister development, his offensive coordinator held the same position at the University of Houston and succeeded Pardee as head coach here. That's right, flamboyant exiled Cougar coach John Jenkins is reviving his career in Alabama, where he can show his players videotapes of naked women to his heart's content. At least he doesn't have to worry about being accused of paying players and ruining a once-proud football program.

Klingler will be throwing to no less than five former Cougar receivers.

Former All-Americans Manny Hazard (1989-90) and Jason Phillips (1987-88) are the veteran slot receivers.

Marcus Grant and John Brown III (1990-91) will position themselves at wideout, and receiver/kick returner Donald Moffet (1992-93) will be switching back to his Jenkins era positions. Current Cougar head coach Kim Helton used him with some success at running back in 1993.

 

 

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FORMER COUGARS DOMINATE SPORTS WORLD

by Brian "Soul Train Coltrin"

Daily Cougar Staff

How 'bout them Coogs !! The Coogs? What have they done? Well, for those of you who haven't been paying attention, the Cougars are tearing up the athletic world. If you live in Houston, you cannot escape the barrage of Phi Slama Jama memories. Led by Clyde Drexler and Finals MVP Hakeem Olajuwon, the Houston Cougars, I mean Rockets, won the NBA Championship. Let us not forget the fine contributions of another former Cougar, Carl Herrera. Also in the NBA, ex-Cougar Charles "Bo" Outlaw has been putting in valuable time for the Los Angeles Clippers, staying among the league leaders in blocked shots per game, his forte during a stellar college career.

OK so UH has put out a few basketball stars; so what? I have news for you, ex-Coogs litter the sports world like squirrels on campus.

If you are like me and flip through golf out of honor for your father, you still have heard the name Fred Couples. Yes, Couples was a Cougar, and he even lived on campus in the infamous Taub Hall. His roommates, Blaine McCallister and Jim Nantz also spent their collegiate time on the links here at good ol' UH. Nantz is now the premier sports announcer at CBS, while Fred and Blaine continue to blaze trails in the PGA. Through the 1994 Tour Championship, UH had 7 golfers in the top 100 career money leaders on the PGA tour, 5 in the top 50 alone!

Let us not forget the biggest track star ever, Carl Lewis. He's still going strong, recently finishing second in the long jump at the U.S. Outdoor Championships. His performance earned him a berth on the U.S. team headed for the World Championships later this year. Hopefully, the 1996 Games in Atlanta will be his fourth consecutive Olympic appearance.

Leroy Burrell, who holds the world record in the 100-meter sprint, is also an UH alumnus.

In the past few years, apathy for University of Houston athletics has grown astronomically. UH students just don't seem to care. Some people say it is because we are a commuter school. Well, the University of Michigan is a commuter school and they average just over 100,000 screaming blue and gold fans per football game.

And how would you explain the capacity crowd at the Astrodome for the highly anticipated basketball "Game of the Century" in 1968, featuring legendary Cougar Elvin Hayes versus the dynastic UCLA, led by Lew Alcindor (a.k.a. Kareem Abdul Jabbar) – there were 52,693 fans in attendance. Hayes scored 35 points and grabbed 15 rebounds in leading UH past THE college basketball dynasty, 71-69. Big "E" can be seen every summer at Hofheinz Pavilion for the reunion game.

Granted, the success rate of Cougar athletics hasn't given us a whole lot to cheer about these past few years, but the history, the tradition. Yes, those words can be used here at UH. Athletes like Doug Drabek (former Cy Young award winner), Lamar Lathon (Carolina Panthers linebacker), and of course Hakeem and Clyde have instilled this institution with a lot of rich history.

I'm not saying to rush out and buy nothing but red and white, although that would be a nice touch, I am only implying that as we all struggle through college, together at the University of Houston, we should all remember the proud memories of yesteryear and support our athletic programs as "we" strive to attain new glories.

 

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SCORELESS TIE WITH COLUMBIA ENOUGH FOR HOME TEAM U.S. CUP VICTORY

by James V. Geluso

Senior Writer

You know that anyone who claims that soccer is a boring game missed the final match of the U.S. Cup tournament, which took place Sunday.

It was a scoreless tie between the United States and Colombia, but it was a nail-biting, teeth-grinding, 90-minute hell for anyone watching.

The tie resulted in a win for the U.S., who finished the tournament with seven points to Colombia's five.

Mexico ended the tournament with four points and Nigeria with none. Three points are awarded for a win and one for a draw in the four-team round-robin tournament.

Sunday's game was a frantic, aggressive show of force by both teams. The first half was an endless battle for possession of the ball, with several shots taken by each team.

The second half slowed down a little, and by the 80th minute, it appeared the U.S. team was content to sit on its tie rather than play for the win.

Alexi Lalas turned in a strong performance. He also got into several shouting matches with Colombian player Rincon, who he has met on the field in his professional play in Italy.

The strong showing of the U.S. came as a surprise to many observers, and bodes well for the success of the team in the Copa America, the South American championship which will be played in Uruguay next month.

The team that played for the U.S. was very similar to the team that played in last year's World Cup. Cobi Jones and Thomas Dooley were among the stars that returned to the U.S. team this year. The U.S. goaltender from the World Cup team, Tony Meola, was absent, replaced by Brad Friedel, who made several saves in tight spaces.

The U.S. victories were very significant for the team, particularly the 4-0 surprise victory over Mexico. Mexico had beaten the U.S. by the same score in 1993.

The Mexican team was almost entirely the same team that played in last year's World Cup, making a strong showing until they were eliminated by Bulgaria in the Round of 16.

The U.S.-Colombia match was the first match of the teams since the infamous World Cup match last year, in which Colombian player Andres Escobar secured the U.S. victory by shooting into his own goal. That goal cost him his life; he was assassinated upon his return home.

The victories also bode well for the future of interim U.S. coach Steve Sampson. Sampson took over after Bora Milutinovic was fired, but the U.S. Soccer Federation is still looking for a foreign coach with more experience and prestige.

Sampson has said that he wishes to remain coach, especially since switching coaches now could hurt the team. Since qualifying for the 1998 Since World Cup play begins next year, continuity is especially important, he said.

 

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WEDDING CONSULTANTS: REFS OR HIRED HELP

by Christine Elliott

Contributing Writer

Some things never change, like getting married. Even today, all you need is a ring, a preacher and two little words.

And a person who wants to know if anyone in your family is allergic to zucchini.

This person is your wedding consultant, a bridal professional who is becoming a matrimonial fixture in the ’90's especially among the well-to-do. Bridal consultants are hired to arrange the chamber orchestras, the security guards, the trolley rides to the country club, the guest lists are longer than the cast of <I>Ben Hur<P> and the caviar-and-Moet Chandon receptions.

These mega-events require months and perhaps years of planning. It's June now, but consultants are going full-tilt on preparations for next summer's festive events. Consultants are in demand throughout the year so there is not much time to stop and smell the roses on the wedding cake.

Typical job: Help book the church and reception hall; order the wedding dress; arrange wedding portraits; sharpen the guest list; select mail invitations; choose the florist, the photographer and the musicians; select the menu and wine; settle on the table decorations; order the cake; disperse the wedding announcements; plan and execute pre-wedding parties; set up lodging for out-of-town guests; arrange shopping trips and sight-seeing expeditions for them; catalogue gifts; issue thank-you notes; delegate wedding-party task; pin boutonnieres; and attend to a billion other minute details that would distract a normal person who is about to commit his or her life to another.

Who are these magicians who, for a price, can get the groom to the church on time, keep the band out of the shrimp dip and the children's fingers out of the wedding cake?

These are professionals, mostly women, with nerves of steel, who don't flinch when there are lost rings, tardy priests, hung-over attendants or flipped over wedding cakes. They are a combination of gophers, go-betweens, bouncers, therapists, diplomats, mother confessors and battlefield generals who will place themselves, even bodily, between the bride and all her admirers.

They're people like Janet Warren, one in a handful of Houston women who is unofficially recognized as the <I>creme de la creme<P> of bridal consultants. "I can hang tough. I get very close to my girls, and I can be loving and considerate. But, I'm no milquetoast. I don't take anything off people. I run interference for the family," she says with a stern face.

"I'm an intermediary. I work with total authority, except for certain things like closing down the bar or turning down the amplifiers, where I have to check with the father of the bride."

Warren said even prominent families accustomed to the social whirl aren't well-versed in the ways of the wedding business, so they depend on her to keep things straight. She is a multi-faceted woman with big, red Texas hair, elaborately arched eyebrows, turquoise ringed eyes and strawberry-pink nails. You get the idea she could stare down Hakeem the Dream in a little one-on-one.

Wedding Consultants Rule #1: The wedding should reflect the desires and personality of the bride while remaining within the confines of good taste. This is a challenge when the bride thinks fuchsia cummerbunds are chic and desires peacock feathers in her wedding bouquet.

"Less is more. You don't have to shout to be noticed," says Alice Small. "I would never tell a client they couldn't do something, but I would very tactfully suggest that they perhaps rethink having a barbecue and beans at a black-tie reception." Small is credited by some with being the first independent bridal consultant in Houston.

Consultants have cultivated relationships with the best florists, photographers, cake makers and others on the wedding "team" and can often bargain preferential treatment, even discounts.

"I'd say the biggest challenge in being a consultant is keeping daddy at ease about the budget and keeping mother and daughter from killing each other," Warren says.

Running a close second to tact is restraint. Bridal consultants are discreet by nature. Getting them to drop names and reveal juicy anecdotes is like getting small talk out of a Sphinx. They won't badmouth each other, either. That's because they work in a field where reputation is everything, where one careless word could drive away clients. Few top-notch consultants advertise or carry business cards. It's not uncommon for one bridal consultant to handle weddings for an entire sorority.

The most important characteristics shared by consultants is their willingness, or eagerness.

Wedding Consultant Rule #2: Never exclude the mother of the bride. She wants totem poles carved out of pineapples for table settings? Gently sway her to elegant nosegays, instead. And make her think it was her idea.

"The goal is for guests to stay and have a good time. The worst thing that can happen is to have no one left to throw rice." Warren promotes the idea of bridesmaid dresses that can be worn again. Even though more emphasis is placed on the young couple, their parents need a spotlight also.

Warren sits in a chair in an alcove and talks on the telephone to a staff person at the country club. Someone forgot to put a tray of sandwiches on the trolley car that will spirit the attendants to the reception. It's only a minutes long ride, but there needs to be sandwiches.

"You want to see what I do?" Warren asks, her hand over the receiver. "It's this. I talk on the phone constantly."

Finally, the sandwiches are requisitioned, and Warren goes off to the dressing room, where the videographer is taping the bridesmaids as they help the bride get ready. They are wearing royal blue Victor Costa gowns and coordinated costume jewelry earrings. The bride looks like a young Natalie Wood. Warren makes sure all the young women put their personal articles in the appropriate bags.

Then she makes the groomsmen go through their rites again. Standing among them, she looks like a ice cream cone surrounded by penguins. They goof off, pretend to be doing a football play in front of the altar.

Then, finally, the well-heeled guests are filling the church. Ushers hand out the wedding program. Now Warren is helping the bridesmaids line up, helping unfurl the brides train. The music is playing. But wait a minute. What's wrong with this darn candlelighter? It's not working. Where's the wick? How are we going to light the unity candle?

Warren tells them not to worry, then hurries outside to her Oldsmobile. "Here you go," she says, returning and handing over the long candlelighter. She hasn't even broken a sweat. "I always carry an extra."

Wedding Consultant fact: Post-modern chic aside, pink is still the most favored color for bridesmaid dresses in Texas. However, they no longer need to match the color of the punch.

 

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TRAVELS, LIFE INSPIRE MURALIST'S ART SHOWING

by Fernanda del Villar

Contributing writer

Acclaimed muralist, draftsman, painter, sculptor, inspirational teacher and philosopher, John Biggers, has been a major contributor to the evolution of American art and culture.

An exhibition featuring 127 drawings, prints, sculptures and paintings, including four large-scale murals, will be at the Museum of Fine Arts through Sept. 3.

"View from the Upper Room," subtitle of the exhibition, was chosen by the African American artist and refers to a widely sung spiritual, "Upper Room."

The song, a call to the community to come together and welcome the spirit of redemption, is significant to the artist because it symbolizes the spiritual journey each man and woman takes during a lifetime.

One of the most interesting pieces in the collection is a terra cotta sculpture titled "Sleeping Children," which evokes a sense of calm and well-being.

"It reminds me of when all of us children slept on the floor beside the fire while mother quilted and father read," Biggers says.

Biggers, the youngest of seven children, was born in 1924 and raised in the South.

"We never really thought much about race. The black people lived in their own separate world," he says, "It was a warm world, a close world. For the most part we took care of our own."

When Biggers traveled to Africa in 1957, he discovered the uninterrupted history and culture of his people.

Leaving the segregated South and traveling to Ghana, Togo, Nigeria and Benin was, as Biggers called it, "a positive shock."

Stereotypical images of Africa were replaced with images of a culture vibrant in its creativity and ancient in its social traditions.

His experiences and impressions of Africa can best be illustrated by Biggers' acrylic painting "Jubilee-Ghana Harvest Festival."

It represents an annual festival celebrating the passage of the seasons and the harvest. A ritual dance imitates the motions of the universe and the cycle of the seasons.

The villagers move in a large circle, dancing and singing songs of thanks and praise. Each person in the ritual represents a star or planet, just as each person has a place in everyday life.

Biggers calls the festival "a living astronomy lesson" because each person has to learn and perform the path of his or her star in relation to all the others.

His murals, like all his art, present complex ideas and history in accessible, visual terms.

Biggers passed on the tradition of mural painting to his students while chairman of the art department at Texas Southern University.

As a result of his mural program, there are 120 student murals on the university campus.

In his latest cycle of works, Biggers provides a universal system of symbols, inspired by African American culture but reaching toward the cosmos for meaning.

Always a student of science, the artist seeks to combine the logic of physics, the expansive order of astronomy and the ancient fundamentals of architecture to provide a structure for his humanistic subject matter.

His most expressive work in this area is his oil and acrylic painting "Seven Little Sister."

It is a reference to astronomy and the constellations Pleiades, often referred to as the Seven Sisters. Both the Big Dipper and Little Dipper are also comprised of seven stars.

Biggers relates this work to the first stellar calendars, created by women and conveying the voyage of life through the female.

In this painting the movement of the sun begins and ends with washpot that Biggers likens to a womb, a source of creation and symbol for matriarchy, cleansing and purification.

Biggers' art combines his experiences in the South, his travels in Africa and his extensive studies of astronomy and ancient icons into an unusual, yet stirring, expression of feeling.

"It was the atmosphere in our home which was most important, the insistence that we respect ourselves and other people too; the insistence on high standards; the unwavering belief in right, in the truly Christian way of life; in these things I perceive the basic impulse for creativity," Biggers says.

 

 

UH GRAD ELECTED TO HALL OF FAME

by Maike van Wijk

Daily Cougar Staff

UH graduate Carlos E. Buchanan II is the prototype of the outstanding student. Not only was he selected as one of 30 students in the UH entrepreneurial program five years ago, he is also one of 22 Texas Business Hall of Fame Foundation scholarship recipients this year.

Buchanan, 21, a 1990 graduate from Alief Hastings High School in Houston, enrolled in the UH College of Business Administration to obtain a finance degree, but then heard of the entrepreneurial program. Buchanan became one of the 30 students that comprised the founding class of the program, headed by Bill Sherril.

Buchanan intended to graduate at age 20, but took a year off to work. "I missed one fall semester and took three hours that spring and six hours that summer," he said.

Sherril said, "He (Buchanan) is a Cum Laude graduate and has an outstanding record in the program. He has a great future in front of him."

Buchanan gives no spectacular reason for his selection. "I saw the scholarships listed and read that they required leadership qualities. I was membership officer of the Entrepreneur Group and became President in 1994. I also did a lot of other things in school," he said.

During the selection process, Buchanan was interviewed by the vice president of a bank, a director selected by the TBHF Foundation.

"The program is trying to find people who they think are going to be successful and will create jobs in Texas, which is what I want to do," Buchanan said. "They supported people like George Mitchell, who founded the Woodlands."

Buchanan has previously done internships in the marketing divisions of advertising firms where he did marketing. He also was an intern at Beechcraft, the corporate jet manufacturer, where he helped the sales process become more target-marketed by developing databases of potential customers.

He said what he liked most about his years at UH was talking to the new students. "The freshmen have no concept of what college is all about. They think it's party a little, study a little, but they really don't know," he said.

"No one knows where UH is at in Houston. Its like you drive around and say: 'Hey, when did this pop up?' I like to pump them (the freshmen) up, help them see that education is worthwhile. I like to tell them my own experiences; people offer me jobs now. I give them pointers to live in moderation, to take their education and apply it," he said.

Born in Puerto Rico, Buchanan moved to Louisiana when he was one year old. His family eventually moved to Panama.

He came back to the United States when he was in third grade, and has lived in San Antonio and Houston for the past 11 years.

Buchanan's said the key to success is "focus, hard work, be different."

"You have to focus on what you're going to do and work harder than anyone else to get there," he said. "But you also have to add your personal touch to it. The school is not there to create robots. Schools need to produce well-rounded students."

Buchanan added that college students should learn about their strengths and weaknesses and how to use their uniqueness.

"They need to use their differences to their advantage, being a robot is not going to work in today's business world," he said. "The businesses want individuals and the ability to allow them to be leaders."

Buchanan will enroll in the UH Masters of Business Administration program in the fall. He will also look into the new Master's entrepreneurship program at the College of Business Administration, but said one of his strengths is finance with an international focus. He said he picks up languages easily and is adaptable to different cultures. "But I will definitely take some entrepreneurship classes," he said.

This summer, Buchanan is helping the UH Center for Entrepreneurship prepare for a June 24 luncheon and also does consulting for companies.

"I'm developing a business plan for a company that makes $3 million per year but is looking to make $4 million next year. They have a potential to go well past $4 million. I'm calling their business plan a 'plan for growth' because it needs to fit with their organization," he said.

Buchanan also works at his church as a youth leader. He recently returned from a summer camp with seventh and eighth graders. He said he likes using his experience to help youth.

"When you see their growth, it makes the work worthwhile," he said.

As part of his award, Buchanan will be given a $5,000 grant at the Texas Business Hall of Fame Awards Dinner October 5. The TBHF, a nonprofit foundation, has been existence for 12 years. The organization selects hall of fame members from all business schools in Texas and has awarded more than $700,000 in scholarships.

Christy Morrow, account executive at Gallier and Wittenberg, a nonprofit public relations firm in Dallas, said that qualifications for the Texas Business Hall of Fame Scholarship vary from year to year. Winners must exhibit leadership traits in academic and campus activities, entrepreneurialship, a good academic record (above 3.00), outstanding moral character, must be a graduating senior planning to enroll in an MBA program at a Texas university or a first-year graduate student enrolled in an MBA program, must be a U.S. Citizen, attend a black-tie award dinner in the fall and has to make him- or herself available for interviews as needed.

"The applicants fill out an essay expressing why they are in business school, what they have done in the past, what hardships they had to overcome in school and where they see themselves in the future," Morrow said.

She said the scholarships are not based on financial need, and men and women are equally represented, but are from different ethnic backgrounds.

"Some single mothers received scholarships and some people who came back to school after they had been away 30 years. They come from different social backgrounds," Morrow said.

The entrepreneurship program at UH was conceived by the dean of the College of Business Administration, John M. lvancevich, in 1989 and implemented two years ago, said Sherril.

The program consists of 18 undergraduate semester hours at a junior and senior level. The initial junior level class is open to all business students, and anyone can apply for selection into the entrepreneurial program after that semester, Sherril said.

Of the applicants, who must be registered in the CBA and thus meet the school's minimum requirements, 30 students are selected, he said. The students are interviewed by panels of one academic professor and two entrepreneurs.

The executive professor said that next to the six entrepreneur courses, which are currently classified under Marketing (MARK) in the class schedule, the program assigns mentors for each student. These mentors are matched with students during "mentor-mixers," one of the many social functions the entrepreneurship program contains.

The mentors support students and have regular round table discussions, each table is comprised six students and one mentor. Sherril said that the mentors also help students with internships. "The students have arranged internships on their own; the program hasn't needed to arrange internships for them yet," Sherril said.

"We have company tours, but they are different in that they are led by the CEO's of the company," he said. Other programs include "Dress for Success," where future entrepreneurs are advised in how to dress appropriately, but doing so inexpensively, Sherril said. The program also has a "Table of Etiquette" dinner, guest speakers, and communication, writing and speaking workshops.

The Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation often speaks at clubs like the Texas Entrepreneur Society, said Sherril, where they ask for business entrepreneurs to volunteer as mentors.

Organizations can also become stakeholders by contributing $ 1,000 for five years, through which the program funds its activities, he said. "That way the program doesn't cost the school state funds," said Sherril.

"This summer, 30 students are half way through the program and we will begin a class in the fall," Sherril said.

 

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