FOUR MORE POSTS VACATED

ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENTS ARE ASKED TO STEP DOWN

by Bobby Summers

Daily Cougar Staff

Four University of Houston associate vice presidents will step down Aug. 31 as the administration of newly installed President Glenn Goerke begins major restructuring of UH's upper echelon management.

On Tuesday, Glenn B. Freedman, UH executive associate vice president since Aug. 1, confirmed rumors that have circulated on campus for weeks that Associate Vice President for Academic Programs Shirley Ezell, Associate Vice President for Enrollment Services Sharon Richardson, Associate Vice President for Faculty Affairs Grace Butler and Interim Vice President for University Relations Geri Konigsberg were asked to "step down" and have submitted their resignations.

"Yes, they have resigned," Freedman said. "That's part of the reorganization of the provost's office."

He said the administration is looking at what it has and how it makes decisions about the overall cost effectiveness of the institution.

"We're getting ready to submit a reorganization plan to the Board (of Regents) on Aug. 23," Freedman said. "It goes to them because it is a part of the budget for next year and it is a part of the next generation of the institution."

He said these changes, as well as possible further moves, are a result of the new administration's desire to stabilize UH's financial position.

"The charge to us as we came to the institution was to get this institution on a firm financial footing, a firm academic footing and a firm base to move into its next stage." he said.

Freedman did not say who will fill the open positions or when those appointments will be announced.

However, he did say the office of associate vice president for University Relations, now occupied by Konigsberg, is being eliminated.

According to Freedman, the administration decided that office seemed to be a position that "essentially coordinated other people" and could be eliminated, thus saving the university "a few dollars."

Freedman said, the four department directors in Media Relations will now report directly to him.

Konigsberg previously served as director of information and community relations for the Houston Independent School District and as a senior staff consultant for Houston Lighting and Power. She came to UH as director of Media Relations in 1993.

She was promoted to interim associate vice president in 1994 when Wendy Adair moved to the UH System office as interim vice chancellor for System Relations.

Konigsberg will return to her old job as director of Media Relations Sept. 1.

Richardson left office Aug. 1 and is now a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Cultural Studies.

Ezell is on vacation and was unavailable for comment.

Butler was also not available for comment Tuesday.

 

 

*******************************************************

*******************************************************

 

UH'S VISIT TO CUBA SETS GOOD EXAMPLE

by James V. Geluso

Senior Writer

Three UH students were among seven arriving from a week-long stay in Cuba Monday.

Michael Chamberlain, Paul Coltrin and Lori Williams left July 30 for the Cuba Lives International Youth Festival. All three are members of UH's Cuba Friendship Committee, which successfully lobbied the UH Students' Association to establish a sister-campus relationship with the University of Havana.

While in Cuba, the group participated in a march that drew more than 500,000 people to protest the U.S. embargo on Cuba.

The group also stayed with Cuban families during a three-day session that sent them to different areas of the island nation.

"That was just brilliant," said Chamberlain, who visited the province of Via Clara. "We got a chance to feel what life is like to average Cuban families. We couldn't have gotten that by just walking around the cities and talking to people."

Chamberlain said the blockade has had real effects on the Cuban people, but hasn't broken them.

"There are real shortages caused by the blockade," he said. "For instance, my family always runs out of toilet paper. I left them a few simple items they couldn't get, like aspirin and shampoo.

"They never run out of food, due to a crash program they started three years ago that's paying off very well."

The blockade hurts the United States as well as Cuba, Chamberlain said. "It would be very beneficial to U.S. businesses to sell simple things like that to the Cubans."

Cubans have to pay inflated prices for simple goods, he said, because they have to go halfway around the world to buy the items, and then must buy from merchants who can charge higher prices because they know they don't have to compete with American manufacturers.

Coltrin said that while he met many Cubans of all sorts, he didn't meet any that were vehemently anti-Castro.

"I talked with some people who were thinking of leaving, but it wasn't because they were specifically anti-Castro," Coltrin said. "The migration from poor countries to rich countries is universal."

Chamberlain said the group also met with the student leaders at the University of Havana, where they discussed ways to further the relationship between the two schools. Ideas included student exchanges, intercollegiate sports competitions and a visit by some of Havana's physics professors.

That relationship exists only between the student bodies of the two schools. The administration here has disassociated itself from that union, according to Chamberlain.

Several colleges have sister-campus relationships with Cuban schools, but Chamberlain said he knows of only one, Edinboro College in Pennsylvania, where the administration endorsed the relationship.

"The students are really setting a good example for our elders," he said.

 

*******************************************************

*******************************************************

 

HRM PROFESSOR PROMOTES UH, LATEST BOOK ON CNN

Cougar news services

Ronald A. Nykiel, a professor in the School of Hotel and Restaurant Management, made an appearance on CNN's business program, <I>Managing With Lou Dobbs<P>, Saturday.

Nykiel was promoting his latest book to be released in paperback, <I>You Can't Lose if the Customer Wins<P>.

Nykiel said he was pleased to have the opportunity to promote the university in such a good light. This is his second appearance on television.

He added that the HRM program at UH is something that he is proud to promote, as it is considered one of the best in the country. Nykiel said he feels it is the best.

"I think it is a better program than Purdue and Cornell (the other schools considered to be at the top)," he said.

He said there are three attributes that UH has to offer that no other school can. He cited that the Conrad Hilton is a self-contained classroom and hotel, which is rarely found anywhere else. That Houston is such a diverse city helps since HRM is a "global industry." Finally, there is a balance in the faculty between academics and people from the field.

Nykiel is from the latter, coming to UH from Stouffer Hotel Company where he was a senior vice president. He has been teaching at UH since January 1994 and holds the Conrad N. Hilton Distinguished Chair.

 

 

*******************************************************

*******************************************************

 

DESPITE SOME DISPUTE, SA RAISES SALARIES

VICE PRESIDENT, STUDENT REGENT TO RECEIVE $50 PAY RAISE REFLECTING INCREASED WORK

by James V. Geluso

Senior Writer

The Students' Association passed a bill Tuesday raising the salaries of the vice president and student regent despite a warning that such a bill is unconstitutional.

The bill raises the vice president's salary to $416 per month and the student regent's to $266 dollars per month. The vice president was earning $366 per month, and the student regent $216 per month.

The raises are meant to reflect the increased work due to the combining of several positions last year. The positions of director of personnel and director of external affairs were eliminated by the last senate. The duties of the director of personnel were given to the vice president, and those of the director of external affairs were given to the student regent.

The director of personnel made $416 per month, and the director of external affairs made $366 per month. However, the combined positions remained at the lower rates.

"It's probably just a glitch that when these positions were combined, foresight didn't allow us to adjust the salaries of the affected positions," said SA adviser Doug Miller.

Sen. Casey McMurtry objected to the passage of the bill, saying that it is unconstitutional.

"The constitution and code clearly state that we are not even to consider a piece of legislation that raises salaries within the current administration," McMurtry said.

"The last administration passed a lot of legislation that was unconstitutional, and we've seen what a mess that creates. I think this piece of legislation is screaming, 'Let me go back to committee.' "

The Senate ignored his pleas, however, by passing it from committee by a 4-2 margin, and then passing it 3-3. Senate Speaker Jennifer Zuber, who helped write the bill, cast the deciding vote and passed the bill.

Sen. Rick Boeker also objected to the bill because it applies the money retroactively to April 1, when the positions were combined.

"I don't believe in retroactivity," he said. "I understand five months is a long time for them to wait to get this raise, but I don't think we should have that in the bill."

Zuber said the money for the raises was already allocated in the SA budget.

The Senate also was addressed by Ying Ha, vice president of the UH Wall Crawlers. Ha told the Senate that the UH Climbing Wall, located in Robertson Stadium, is slated to be removed by the Athletics Department.

Ha said the wall had been used by a popular course in basic mountaineering that had been offered by the campus ROTC. When the teacher of that course left UH, the Athletics Department took over the wall. A change in assistant athletic directors left the wall without support, Ha said, and there is currently a work order to remove it.

The wall is the highest climbing structure in the area, Ha said.

Vice President Dom Lewinsohn suggested that he and President Giovanni Garibay could bring up the matter in their regular meeting with the athletic director.

The Senate also considered the nomination of Tori Boutte, a journalism senior, for the position of director of Public Relations. The position had been vacant since Jeff Fuller left in the middle of July.

"Everything you told me you wanted in a PR person, I think she has," Garibay said.

Sen. Brad Castelo objected to considering Boutte without first referring her to committee.

"It's not fair to subject her to a grilling in front of 15 people," Castelo said.

A motion to allow Boutte's nomination to bypass the Internal

Affairs Committee was defeated by a 3-5 vote.

 

 

*******************************************************

*******************************************************

 

UH KITCHENS NOT SO CLEAN AFTER ALL

by James Aldridge

Daily Cougar Staff

The Food Facility Sanitation Inspection Reports from the restaurants around campus show the majority of their health and safety problems are a result of poor or faulty equipment and plumbing in the kitchen areas.

ARAMark operates and manages the restaurants in the University Center, Satellite and residence halls.

Bob Bowden of the Environmental and Physical Safety Department, the university agency on campus that handles inspections, said, "Our program is based on city, state and federal codes."

Bowden said EPSD enforces the strictest codes for campus dining. "If the city code is the most strict we will enforce it," he said.

Food Service Director Frank Trazzera said as ARAMark policy goes, they too will adhere to the highest health and safety standards possible.

Bowden explained why the department inspected ARAMark the way it did.

EPSD inspects ARAMark about twice a year, and Marsha Present, its health inspector, comes in unexpectedly to scrutinize the kitchen.

Bowden said Present was hired and a health program was installed to inspect ARAMark after an outbreak of food-borne illnesses in Oberholtzer Hall in the Quadrangle left numerous students sick back in April 1991.

At that time, the City of Houston conducted the inspections, Bowden said.

There have been no new cases of food-borne illnesses due to ARAMark food since the university installed its program in August 1991, Bowden said.

Now, Trazzera said the earliest notice he's ever received is an hour when Present called him to say she will be there after running an errand. He said there would be no way to anticipate the inspections, and ARAMark would not be able to try to hide sloppiness in the kitchen.

ARAMark has, however, not had a perfectly clean record in the last 35 years on campus.

In the latest reports, all restaurants had violations of poor equipment standards.

In the Satellite, its dish washing machine was quarantined because the machine didn't have the proper mix of solution per cycle. This was the second time this year that the machine was quarantined.

Having a machine quarantined means it cannot be used until it is repaired, Trazzera said.

Another common health problem of ARAMark is its plumbing. In the American Cafe, its pipes under the dish washing machine, in the bakery and a compartment sink were leaky.

Out of all of the restaurants on campus, Horizons in Moody Towers was the worst, with 16 violations. At that cafeteria, slime and mildew was found near the chute in the ice machine from July's inspection. The machine was washed and sanitized that day.

Also, its dishwasher had thick slime accumulations hanging from its spray jets and mildew and food particles were found. That machine was quarantined due to filth, the report said.

In another violation, clean tableware and utensils were stored along with dirty tableware on dirty shelves. According to standards, clean products must be stored so as to prevent contamination.

Horizons was most in need of cleaning compared to other campus restaurants. Its storeroom, cooking equipment, serving utensils, fryer wells, soup wells and yogurt dispenser all had either food particles and/or some type of growth on them.

Whenever EPSD pinpoints a violation, a time limit is given to correct the problem. The more immediate the problem, the sooner the problem must be corrected, Bowden said. All of Horizons' problems had to be fixed that day.

However, the university owns the equipment and is responsible for maintaining the plumbing in the facilities.

Bowden said, "We are aware that ARAMark doesn't own the equipment."

Production Manager Kevin O'Loughlin said whenever ARAMark gets an inspection report with violations, it gets cut in half with one half for maintenance issues and the other half for ARAMark issues.

Bowden said the UC kitchen area is maintained by the UC Building Services staff and the residence hall facilities are maintained by the Residential Life and Housing Department.

 

 

*******************************************************

*******************************************************

 

SOUTHWEST CONFERENCE ALL-STAR SQUAD IS 2-0 ON MEXICAN TOUR

UH forward Ford averaging 18.5

by Dominic Corva

Daily Cougar Staff

University of Houston senior forward Kirk Ford is averaging 18.5 point and 3.5 rebounds per game for the Southwest Conference All-Star basketball team now touring Mexico.

` Last Thursday, the team eked out a 132-130 victory over the Rayados de Monterrey team. Ford figured big in the victory with 22 points, four rebounds, two assists and one steal. Jason Sasser of Texas Tech led all scorers in that game with 33, and Shaun Igo from Rice added a solid 15-point, nine-rebound performance.

In the squad's second game against the Tampico professional team, Ford added 15 points and three rebounds as the all-stars cruised to a 124-106 victory. Sasser again led all scorers, this time with a whopping 40 points and 13 rebounds.

Ford was selected to the team after averaging 12.7 points and 5.3 rebounds for the Cougars in 1994-95.

The team is coached by Texas A&M head coach Tony Barone. Other team members include Quinton James of Texas A&M, Troy Matthews of Southern Methodist, Brandy Perriman of Texas, Brian Skinner of Baylor and Byron Waits of TCU.

Waseem Ali of Texas A&M was originally scheduled to play on the team, but suffered a severely sprained wrist and was replaced by James Penny of TCU.

This is the first SWC squad to travel internationally since 1992, when an all-star group went to Australia.

 

 

*******************************************************

*******************************************************

 

SOUTHWEST CONFERENCE ALL-STAR SQUAD IS 2-0 ON MEXICAN TOUR

UH forward Ford averaging 18.5

by Dominic Corva

Daily Cougar Staff

University of Houston senior forward Kirk Ford is averaging 18.5 point and 3.5 rebounds per game for the Southwest Conference All-Star basketball team now touring Mexico.

` Last Thursday, the team eked out a 132-130 victory over the Rayados de Monterrey team. Ford figured big in the victory with 22 points, four rebounds, two assists and one steal. Jason Sasser of Texas Tech led all scorers in that game with 33, and Shaun Igo from Rice added a solid 15-point, nine-rebound performance.

In the squad's second game against the Tampico professional team, Ford added 15 points and three rebounds as the all-stars cruised to a 124-106 victory. Sasser again led all scorers, this time with a whopping 40 points and 13 rebounds.

Ford was selected to the team after averaging 12.7 points and 5.3 rebounds for the Cougars in 1994-95.

The team is coached by Texas A&M head coach Tony Barone. Other team members include Quinton James of Texas A&M, Troy Matthews of Southern Methodist, Brandy Perriman of Texas, Brian Skinner of Baylor and Byron Waits of TCU.

Waseem Ali of Texas A&M was originally scheduled to play on the team, but suffered a severely sprained wrist and was replaced by James Penny of TCU.

This is the first SWC squad to travel internationally since 1992, when an all-star group went to Australia.

 

 

*******************************************************

*******************************************************

 

UH ENTERS NEW ERA WITH GOOD FOUNDATION

by Dominic Corva

Daily Cougar Staff

Since this is the final sports issue of the summer and the final one of my career as sports editor (I'm moving to Seattle), I'd like to take this opportunity to say a few things about UH athletics.

I came to this university with the idea that all college programs are alike. I quickly found out that this is not the case at all. The football games (not even on the campus!) were sparsely attended, and often Cougar fans were outnumbered by visiting team supporters; few students attended volleyball or baseball matches (baseball games had to be played during the middle of the sweltering Houston day because the home field had no lights); and there really wasn't much contact between the athletic hierarchy (Athletic Department Director Rudy Davalos, chump cowboy head football coach John Jenkins, bland head basketball coach Pat Foster) and students.

Thanks to businessman John Moores (now owner of the San Diego Padres, incidentally my favorite team) and Bill Carr (the athletic director who replaced Davalos), the athletic program today is radically different.

Moores made the argument about whether UH could afford a first-class sports program or not moot by donating $26 million to give UH one of the best facilities in the country. As volleyball head coach Bill Walton says, "I tell recruits just to come and look at the complex, and to tell me if they have seen one better. If they have, they can go there. If not ..."

Carr brought a hard-nosed reputation for integrity to UH and hired people like himself for the jobs that quickly opened up: Kim Helton for football and Alvin Brooks (a UH assistant coach) for basketball.

For the last three years, these people and their staff have worked to rebuild a once-proud tradition. They have increased openness to the student body and cleaned up the mess left by their predecessors.

They were visionary enough not to jump in bed with the first conference that invited UH to join when the SWC announced it was breaking up. Though many murmurs of discontent and doubt were heard, they chose to link with schools from across the nation to start a new tradition.

I am confident as I continue with my life in friendlier climates that the University of Houston will build on its strong new foundation with teams that represent the best in human nature. No matter how tough it seems, they will give it their best shot on the field and off.

 

*******************************************************

*******************************************************

 

POLITICAL PRISONER PAINTS POWERFUL PICTURE OF PRISON

PULLQUOTE: A DEMONSTRATION IN SUPPORT OF MUMIA ABU-JAMAL WILL BE HELD SATURDAY AT 1 P.M. IN DOWNTOWN HOUSTON, AT MAIN AND DALLAS STREETS. THE ACTION IS PART OF AN INTERNATIONAL DAY OF PROTESTS FOR JAMAL’S FREEDOM.

by Frank San Miguel

Contributing Writer

Books by people in prison are nothing new. From works like Eldridge Cleaver’s <I>Soul On Ice<P> to George Jackson’s <I>Soledad Brother<P> come the writings of prisoners whose words have proven to be powerful documents. None, though, can claim to be quite so powerful as the words of a condemned man, one who’ll die in less than a month. And, after a great deal of controversy, this book is one with a message that’s by no means a simple read.

Mumia Abu-Jamal -- a former Black Panther, MOVE supporter, journalist, activist and black revolutionary -- was scheduled to die Aug. 17 at 10 p.m. after more than 13 years of Pennsylvania’s death row. Convicted of killing a police officer, Jamal has garnered a sizable measure of support from groups around the world who believe him to be the victim of a politically motivated railroading. Despite a threatened boycott by the Fraternal Order of Police, this well-spoken prisoner’s words are available to the public.

<I>Live From Death Row<P> is a book of essays written by Jamal from behind bars. Most center on legal issues, and none are the finger-pointing variety some might expect; meticulously researched and eloquently written, the writings of Jamal are nothing short of stunning. It’s clear he’s not out just to get himself off the hook but to comment on and criticize the entire systems of "corrections" and "justice." Instead of throttling people with tirades, though, Jamal is at his best when relating facts, figures and firsthand experiences. Some of it is bleak and harrowing, but all of it continually, relentlessly brings one question to mind: Is prison really about corrections? Time and again, Jamal illustrates that it’s more about issuing officials a license to kill.

Say what you will of how prisoners should be treated or of how people should be punished for their acts, but Jamal makes a passionate plea for humanity. Bloody accounts of beatings by guards, cell conditions which violate basic United Nations standards and the grindingly slow mental and emotional deterioration and indignities paint a portrait of prison as less than the air-conditioned country clubs one hears of on TV. In fact, as a journalist from the inside, Jamal makes sure you know that prison is by no means anywhere one wants to end up, much less spend years.

As powerful as prison reports is Jamal’s uncanny ability to relate a story, to touch you with prose. Sorrowed eulogies to the likes of former Black Panther Party Minister of Defense Huey P. Newton, Ph.D, and bittersweet but defiant tales of his own teenage years pock the literary landscape. Jamal is flawless all the way.

<I>Live From Death Row<P> is a potent manuscript, sure to incite argument and thought. Jamal won a stay of execution.

A demonstration in support of Mumia Abu-Jamal will be held Saturday at 1 p.m. in downtown Houston, at Main and Dallas streets. The action is part of an international day of protests for Jamal’s freedom.

 

*******************************************************

*******************************************************

 

 

TRENCHMOUTH SHEDS <I>LIGHT<P> ON EVERY MUSICAL GENRE

Photo by Michael Hay/EastWest Records

Trenchmouth exhibits all types of musical influences from mambo to bluegrass on its latest album, <I>Trenchmouth Vs. The Light of the Sun<P>.

by Frank San Miguel

Contributing Writer

Playing in the sandbox out on the fringe of alternative rock's playground are a precious few groups doing music that is adventurous and transcends definition. You can pick them out of a field of has-beens, could've-beens and never-minds -- No Means No, the Boredoms, Barkmarket, Algebra Suicide, Happy Flowers, Controlled Bleeding and Trenchmouth, to name but a few.

Trenchmouth, the Chicago-born hodgepodge of musical styles, is out with a new release, <I>Trenchmouth Vs. The Light of the Sun<P>. The recording, released by indie imprint Skene! and distributed by the EastWest label, is a classic wrestling match between inspirations, each looking to pin the other or at least go for a draw.

Bands with many influences are pitched around like all kinds of slop in a pigsty, truth be told. How many people aren't spurred to genius by something they listened to as a kid, these days anyway? There are blues-rock, jazz-punk, folk-pop and pop-punk hybrids out there. How about mambo-pop? Folk-jazz? Industrial-samba? Get the idea? Trenchmouth tosses <I>everything<P> together.

What distinguishes the earlier mentioned bands in addition to their musical spaciness is a penchant for equally spacy lyrics. Fortunately, Trenchmouth has always complemented the words with a surreal backdrop. From angst, the natural elements and revolt comes the phrasings of songs. The result is a nearly religious experience.

Trenchmouth has been a percussion and rhythm driven band for some time, and such an orientation comes through loud and clear on even the slower songs. Check out the release's second song, "A Prescription Written in a Different Language," to get an idea of what it means.

The more enjoyable times with Trenchmouth come when it scoops out its punkier roots to blast you in the mug with a cupful of mud. Or maybe the effect could better be likened to a cup of marbles. Trenchmouth's is gritty and hard, yet smooth and rolling. Listen twice and you can hear bastardized chunklets of seminal English punk and American hardcore, from Black Flag to Big Black.

Trenchmouth swerves past the punk minstrelsy just fast enough to throw a new style at you. Bluegrass, classical and noise cut through the racket. The record store will shelve this under "Rock," but it's a sure bet you'll catch hacked-up bits of other music in the mix.

Trenchmouth is a band destined to take out most alt-rock conventions in a shotgun slaying of an aural variety. Its <I>Trenchmouth Vs. The Light of the Sun<P> is only a half-hour evidentiary hearing to this fact, and Exhibits A-J will secure a verdict. Make your own decisions and pick up this fine, fine clatter -- mambo and all.

Visit The Daily Cougar