All welcome

To the editor:

The Houston Alumni Organization recently hosted a special open house for our student body prior to the Lady Cougar vs. Texas Tech basketball game on Saturday, Jan. 20.

While turnout was smaller than we had anticipated, students, alumni and guests were all present at this event. Many of those who attended opted to watch the indoor track meet or take a self-guided tour instead of participating in the guided tour that was reported in Monday's edition of The Daily Cougar.

The Houston Alumni Organization will continue to host numerous opportunities for all Cougars to tour and utilize the new facility. We welcome student organizations to inquire about our meeting rooms and facilities for their campus events. We want you to stop by while on campus and tour the amazing Athletics Hall of Fame, or browse in the gift shop. We want you to take full advantage of the new facility throughout your career as a student. When you graduate and become a UH alumnus or alumna, this building will serve as a special place you can call "home" when you return to campus for one of our many programs, or just to meet up with old classmates and friends.

If you have any questions about the services, programs or facilities of the Houston Alumni Organization, please do not hesitate to stop by our offices. Our staff would welcome your visit!

Nick Brines, Class of `92,

coordinator of programs, Houston Alumni Organization

History lesson

To the editor:

Anthony Montgomery's idyll on American life at the turn of the century (Wednesday) depicts "most Americans" living in an agricultural paradise that was overthrown early in this century by industrialization, transcontinental railroads, and immigrants.

A few facts: According to the U.S. Information Service, "the number of people who owned or worked on farms rose throughout the 19th and early 20th centuries, reaching a peak of 13.6 million (14 percent of the U.S. population) in 1916." The greatest wave of immigration to this country occurred during the 20 years before the Civil War, when as many as 5 million immigrants were arriving each year. The first transcontinental railroad was completed in 1869, and the railroad industry was in decline by 1900.

More dangerous than Montgomery's loose grasp of history is his willingness to overlook other realities of life at the turn of the century. Women and minorities were marginalized and mistreated and had few avenues for assistance. Abuse and neglect of children was legal. I won't quote statistics about illiteracy and infectious disease because that information is available to anyone with eyes open.

The past was not all good, just as the present is not all bad. Montgomery should stop basing his opinions about history on Little House on the Prairie and Rush Limbaugh.

Or The Daily Cougar should stop providing a forum for his misinformation.

Edward F. Gumnick

assistant director, UH Printing Department

Appreciation

To the editor:

I would like to thank those UH faculty and administrators who worked hard to bring our educational programs to Fort Bend County.

The Cougar reported earlier this week that on Jan. 19, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board approved the creation of a multi-institution teaching center in Fort Bend County by all four University of Houston System universities, Houston Community College and Wharton County Junior College. The approval allows us to deliver 30 full degree programs at the CentraPlex for Higher Learning in Sugar Land.

Specifically, the board gave us permission to offer 19 degree programs in addition to the 11 degree programs televised from UH already being offered at the CentraPlex. All four UH System universities will use their resources and collaborate to offer strong curricula for the 19 new degree programs.

Again, I would like to thank the entire UH community for its support.

Edward Hugetz

director, UH System at Fort Bend

Visit The Daily Cougar

All welcome

To the editor:

The Houston Alumni Organization recently hosted a special open house for our student body prior to the Lady Cougar vs. Texas Tech basketball game on Saturday, Jan. 20.

While turnout was smaller than we had anticipated, students, alumni and guests were all present at this event. Many of those who attended opted to watch the indoor track meet or take a self-guided tour instead of participating in the guided tour that was reported in Monday's edition of The Daily Cougar.

The Houston Alumni Organization will continue to host numerous opportunities for all Cougars to tour and utilize the new facility. We welcome student organizations to inquire about our meeting rooms and facilities for their campus events. We want you to stop by while on campus and tour the amazing Athletics Hall of Fame, or browse in the gift shop. We want you to take full advantage of the new facility throughout your career as a student. When you graduate and become a UH alumnus or alumna, this building will serve as a special place you can call "home" when you return to campus for one of our many programs, or just to meet up with old classmates and friends.

If you have any questions about the services, programs or facilities of the Houston Alumni Organization, please do not hesitate to stop by our offices. Our staff would welcome your visit!

Nick Brines, Class of `92,

coordinator of programs, Houston Alumni Organization

History lesson

To the editor:

Anthony Montgomery's idyll on American life at the turn of the century (Wednesday) depicts "most Americans" living in an agricultural paradise that was overthrown early in this century by industrialization, transcontinental railroads, and immigrants.

A few facts: According to the U.S. Information Service, "the number of people who owned or worked on farms rose throughout the 19th and early 20th centuries, reaching a peak of 13.6 million (14 percent of the U.S. population) in 1916." The greatest wave of immigration to this country occurred during the 20 years before the Civil War, when as many as 5 million immigrants were arriving each year. The first transcontinental railroad was completed in 1869, and the railroad industry was in decline by 1900.

More dangerous than Montgomery's loose grasp of history is his willingness to overlook other realities of life at the turn of the century. Women and minorities were marginalized and mistreated and had few avenues for assistance. Abuse and neglect of children was legal. I won't quote statistics about illiteracy and infectious disease because that information is available to anyone with eyes open.

The past was not all good, just as the present is not all bad. Montgomery should stop basing his opinions about history on Little House on the Prairie and Rush Limbaugh.

Or The Daily Cougar should stop providing a forum for his misinformation.

Edward F. Gumnick

assistant director, UH Printing Department

Appreciation

To the editor:

I would like to thank those UH faculty and administrators who worked hard to bring our educational programs to Fort Bend County.

The Cougar reported earlier this week that on Jan. 19, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board approved the creation of a multi-institution teaching center in Fort Bend County by all four University of Houston System universities, Houston Community College and Wharton County Junior College. The approval allows us to deliver 30 full degree programs at the CentraPlex for Higher Learning in Sugar Land.

Specifically, the board gave us permission to offer 19 degree programs in addition to the 11 degree programs televised from UH already being offered at the CentraPlex. All four UH System universities will use their resources and collaborate to offer strong curricula for the 19 new degree programs.

Again, I would like to thank the entire UH community for its support.

Edward Hugetz

director, UH System at Fort Bend

Visit The Daily Cougar