Hard Choices

The University of Houston has no women's soccer team, nor does it have a woman's golf team. We also have no intercollegiate teams in men's soccer, tennis, swimming or diving.

We do have a football team. In the past two seasons and the first three games of this one, that team has produced two wins.

Last season our women's volleyball team reached the Elite Eight in the NCAA volleyball tournament. They didn't need 95 scholarships to do it.

Interim President Glenn Goerke said Wednesday that the administration is "taking a hard look at athletics now." Interim Chancellor William P. Hobby reportedly recommended the abolition of the Rice University football program while chancellor there.

The times are changing. It's becoming harder and harder to compete in big-money sports like football. The Cougars' recent lack of success on the football field the last few seasons has a lot of people wondering why we continue to spend so much money for so few wins.

But many people value the prestige and the sense of pride and community that winning programs bring. Many people want athletics to stay -- but they want our teams to just win, baby.

It may be unrealistic to expect the football team to become a national powerhouse, especially with the move to Conference USA. Why not put all those football scholarships and all that football money to better use?

With the money currently being spent on the football program, UH could afford to add a number of new sports to the athletics menu, and it could provide those teams, as well as our existing teams (except football) with the necessary funding to be perennial contenders.

Let's face it: In this era, winning teams require heavy funding. Premier coaches expect commensurate salaries. The cost of equipment and facilities is exorbitant -- just ask John Moores.

Football is by far the most expensive sport to support, and it looks as if UH is being priced out of that market. But there's still room for us in other sports.

Let's be realistic: If we can't afford a championship-caliber football team, let's cut our losses and kick ass in everything else.

Visit The Daily Cougar

Hard Choices

The University of Houston has no women's soccer team, nor does it have a woman's golf team. We also have no intercollegiate teams in men's soccer, tennis, swimming or diving.

We do have a football team. In the past two seasons and the first three games of this one, that team has produced two wins.

Last season our women's volleyball team reached the Elite Eight in the NCAA volleyball tournament. They didn't need 95 scholarships to do it.

Interim President Glenn Goerke said Wednesday that the administration is "taking a hard look at athletics now." Interim Chancellor William P. Hobby reportedly recommended the abolition of the Rice University football program while chancellor there.

The times are changing. It's becoming harder and harder to compete in big-money sports like football. The Cougars' recent lack of success on the football field the last few seasons has a lot of people wondering why we continue to spend so much money for so few wins.

But many people value the prestige and the sense of pride and community that winning programs bring. Many people want athletics to stay -- but they want our teams to just win, baby.

It may be unrealistic to expect the football team to become a national powerhouse, especially with the move to Conference USA. Why not put all those football scholarships and all that football money to better use?

With the money currently being spent on the football program, UH could afford to add a number of new sports to the athletics menu, and it could provide those teams, as well as our existing teams (except football) with the necessary funding to be perennial contenders.

Let's face it: In this era, winning teams require heavy funding. Premier coaches expect commensurate salaries. The cost of equipment and facilities is exorbitant -- just ask John Moores.

Football is by far the most expensive sport to support, and it looks as if UH is being priced out of that market. But there's still room for us in other sports.

Let's be realistic: If we can't afford a championship-caliber football team, let's cut our losses and kick ass in everything else.

Visit The Daily Cougar