Monday, July 9, 2001 Volume 66, Issue 151


 
 









 
Cincinnati producer shows own skill on new 'Hi-Teknology'


Hi-Tek
Hi-Teknology
****Out of five stars
Rawkus Entertainment
By Maurice Bobb

Daily Cougar Staff

Think back to the early beginnings of rap, circa 1984, when there was an MC and a DJ at a party exciting the crowd just because they enjoyed the art
form, the delivery and the music. 

Now, that love has been replaced by bottom lines and the ever-present pursuit of bling-bling dreams and platinum records. Also lost in the fray is the
DJ -- the maestro behind the turntables who spun the records that the MC rocked the mic to. Weive somehow forgotten that if it werenit for the DJ,
none of this hip-hop culture would mean anything.

Tyler Borich/Rawkus Entertainment


Cincinnati's Hi-Tek, a former DJ to seminal rap duo Black Star, demonstrates his own considerable talent and wide range of influences on his new
release, Hi-Teknology.

Enter Hi-Tek, former DJ to Black Star, a socially conscious rap duo out of Brooklyn. Recently, Hi-Tek collaborated with Talib Kweli, an underrated
MC who made a name for himself as a solo lyricist. What Hi-Tek has done, though, is make an album in the vein of former do-it-all DJ Pete Rock.

Hi-Tek is from Cincinnati, and he lets his roots show on this album. "Iim letting people know that there are MCs in Cincinnati and that weire doing this
from the heart," he says. "We just arenit on the bandwagon. Theyire my people and Iive been working with them for years."

Cincinnati rap group Mood, featured on "Breaking Bread," has been collaborating with Hi-Tek since 1992. Queen City denizens Ravi T, J-Fresh and
Sen Sai were also instrumental in Hi-Tekis early development.

"Thatis why I'm here now. I had a lot of mentors that looked out and took the time to teach me and had love for me … I learned from them," he said. "A
lot of people that are doing it now weren't doing it before it had a shine to it. People don't really understand where hip-hop comes from, and thatis
why they donit understand what makes you dope."

Hi-Tek doesnit rhyme on this release. Rather, he orchestrates a fusion of smart production with the varied talents of rappers on the verge of stardom.
Guests who dropped by the studio to bless the mic include Common, Buckshot, Mos Def, Cormega, Slum Village and, of course, partner in rhyme
Talib Kweli.

Cormega and Hi-Tek met on the dance floor: "She sang a song in my ear at a club," Hi-Tek said, "and her style sounded good. From there, it was
like, ‘Letis record that tomorrow.i" The song "All I Need Is You" was the result.

Standout tracks like "The Sun God," featuring the bankable Common, and "Theme from Hi-Tek," featuring Talib Kweli, make this album a must-listen.
The return of Buckshot of Black Moon fame is, in itself, a treat. Hi-Tek finds old-school funk beats to compliment the chosen ones with intricate lyrics
that weave definite jam material.

Far from being a commercial vehicle, Hi-Teknology will probably never reach the platinum success of a Nelly or a Jay-Z, but it will please the real
hip-hop enthusiasts who revel in the purest form of the medium.

Hi-Tek described Hi-Teknology as "more sporadic" than his previous work with Talib Kweli and Black Star. 

"Iive got R&B," he said, "but Iive also got Kweli and Cormega. You'll have to pick out what you want. Thereis a lot of different styles. It definitely
illustrates how I get down."

Newcomer Jonell blesses three tracks with her soulful voice. She is definitely one to look for on her own release in the future, as is Kweli, who may
finally get due recognition for his talents in the cipher. Now more than ever, the possibility of a new Black Star album is an appealing one,
considering that both Mos Def and Kweli have established a following. And with Hi-Tek displaying his flair for production with Hi-Teknology, Black
Star should see much success in the near future.

Go out and pick up this one -- that is, if you can appreciate hip-hop stripped down of the bling-bling nonsense that has all but ruined the art form.
 
 
 
 
 

Send comments to
dcshobiz@mail.uh.edu

To contact the Shobiz Section Editor, click the e-mail link at the end of this article.

To contact other members of 
The Daily Cougar Online staff, 


 
 
 
 
 

Advertise in The Daily Cougar

Student Publications
University of Houston
Houston, Texas 77204-4071

©2005, Student Publications. All rights reserved.
Permissions/Web Use Policy
http://www.uh.edu/campus/cougar/Todays/Issue/shobiz/shobiz1.html



 

Last upMonday, July 9, 2001:

Visit The Daily Cougar