Thursday, March 21, 2002 Volume 67, Issue 113


 
 









 
Write in columnist for president

Brandon Moeller

I don't normally write about our student government. Perhaps this stems from my UH experience, which dictates student government hasn't done much for us this
year. 

This year's Student Government Association was responsible for blocking the paving over of Frontier Fiesta, extending the hours of the library, more convenient
book loans and temporarily halting the closure of the Chinese Star restaurant across the street, according to SGA Vice President Brandon Butler.

Or perhaps my self-policy of non-involvement and non-criticism of our student government is because of my own laziness.

For instance, reading the SGA constitution could possibly take as much time as Voltaire's Candide. I'm still undecided on which of these tomes is more satirical.

At a University where the motto may as well be the acronym ( ... uh?, get it?), apathy is the only thing higher than our drop-out rate. Drop-out rates muddy the waters,
as such rates are enormous at all institutions of higher learning. Perhaps what is unparalleled is UH students' collective ability not to give a damn. Of course, it
shouldn't be this way. 

And of course, there are people here at this University who not only have the time, but the interest and dedication to make a difference. This is what most of us think
student government is about, why we never bother to find out what is going on. We figure they work for us. They're smart and dedicated. And if we ignore it, we'll still
all win in the end.

The truth is, the student government hasn't done much this year. You may recall that last year James Robertson's Student Voice party won every seat it ran for with
huge margins. I, alone with many of you, voted for this to happen. 

Last year, the Student Voice campaign was an inspiring symbol of change for the campus. The would-be senators promised broad improvements around campus,
especially in terms of keeping the student body informed on their progress. A Web site was re-created to help foster that goal.

Yet if a student were to go to the Web site today (www.uh.edu/sga), it would still be hard to pinpoint exactly what the current administration has done for the student
body. 

You could tell they wanted to create a dead week, a much-needed stress-relieving change. But where's the bill? Is it in the SGA president's hands still? Is it in UH
President Arthur K. Smith's hands? Talk of the bill made the front page of The Daily Cougar. 

But what has happened since? SGA minutes of its meetings would help in this regard. The SGA Web site promised to post the minutes as soon as they became
available. But the last ones posted are from the end of October, almost five months ago.

Of course, a Web site does not make a student government. But good communication does. One could assume that SGA didn't want word of candidate filing
deadlines to get out by its lack of advertisement of them. 

And instead of being there at the last minute for a majority of students here who, no offense, are slackers SGA members decided to skip one of their last meetings
to see of a women's basketball game.

A Web site can shed a billion rays of light on the progress of a student government.

Power corrupts. The only good thing about how this relates to student government is that student-elected representatives are not granted a lot of power.

If they were, one would assume, they would have done a lot more for us. To their credit, they did manage to help garner support for a much needed improvement of
emergency call boxes around campus. And they tried to rewrite the policy about grade replacements, but of course, the status of that bill is still questionable.

Next week, on our way to classes or perhaps work, we will pass by student political campaigns disguised as publicity campaigns. Our deep-down civic notions will
be abused as fellow students pay for our votes with candy, stickers and even T-shirts.

If you're disgusted with the system, I encourage you to write in my name for student government president. Do it for your University. Do it to stay informed, in case
you ever wanted to be in the first place. If you'd like to participate in my counter-campaign, please contact me through the following e-mail address.

Moeller, a senior communication major, can be reached at 

brandonmoeller@hotmail.com.

Write in columnist for president

Brandon Moeller

I don't normally write about our student government. Perhaps this stems from my UH experience, which dictates student government hasn't done much for us this
year. 

This year's Student Government Association was responsible for blocking the paving over of Frontier Fiesta, extending the hours of the library, more convenient
book loans and temporarily halting the closure of the Chinese Star restaurant across the street, according to SGA Vice President Brandon Butler.

Or perhaps my self-policy of non-involvement and non-criticism of our student government is because of my own laziness.

For instance, reading the SGA constitution could possibly take as much time as Voltaire's Candide. I'm still undecided on which of these tomes is more satirical.

At a University where the motto may as well be the acronym ( ... uh?, get it?), apathy is the only thing higher than our drop-out rate. Drop-out rates muddy the waters,
as such rates are enormous at all institutions of higher learning. Perhaps what is unparalleled is UH students' collective ability not to give a damn. Of course, it
shouldn't be this way. 

And of course, there are people here at this University who not only have the time, but the interest and dedication to make a difference. This is what most of us think
student government is about, why we never bother to find out what is going on. We figure they work for us. They're smart and dedicated. And if we ignore it, we'll still
all win in the end.

The truth is, the student government hasn't done much this year. You may recall that last year James Robertson's Student Voice party won every seat it ran for with
huge margins. I, alone with many of you, voted for this to happen. 

Last year, the Student Voice campaign was an inspiring symbol of change for the campus. The would-be senators promised broad improvements around campus,
especially in terms of keeping the student body informed on their progress. A Web site was re-created to help foster that goal.

Yet if a student were to go to the Web site today (www.uh.edu/sga), it would still be hard to pinpoint exactly what the current administration has done for the student
body. 

You could tell they wanted to create a dead week, a much-needed stress-relieving change. But where's the bill? Is it in the SGA president's hands still? Is it in UH
President Arthur K. Smith's hands? Talk of the bill made the front page of The Daily Cougar. 

But what has happened since? SGA minutes of its meetings would help in this regard. The SGA Web site promised to post the minutes as soon as they became
available. But the last ones posted are from the end of October, almost five months ago.

Of course, a Web site does not make a student government. But good communication does. One could assume that SGA didn't want word of candidate filing
deadlines to get out by its lack of advertisement of them. 

And instead of being there at the last minute for a majority of students here who, no offense, are slackers SGA members decided to skip one of their last meetings
to see of a women's basketball game.

A Web site can shed a billion rays of light on the progress of a student government.

Power corrupts. The only good thing about how this relates to student government is that student-elected representatives are not granted a lot of power.

If they were, one would assume, they would have done a lot more for us. To their credit, they did manage to help garner support for a much needed improvement of
emergency call boxes around campus. And they tried to rewrite the policy about grade replacements, but of course, the status of that bill is still questionable.

Next week, on our way to classes or perhaps work, we will pass by student political campaigns disguised as publicity campaigns. Our deep-down civic notions will
be abused as fellow students pay for our votes with candy, stickers and even T-shirts.

If you're disgusted with the system, I encourage you to write in my name for student government president. Do it for your University. Do it to stay informed, in case
you ever wanted to be in the first place. If you'd like to participate in my counter-campaign, please contact me through the following e-mail address.

Moeller, a senior communication 
major, can be reached at brandonmoeller@hotmail.com.



 

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