Friday, March 22, 2002 Volume 67, Issue 14


 
 









 

Letters to the Editor
 

Word games

To the editor:

I'd like to refute Mary Carradine's statement about the Republican "staple" in her column "Hate crime needs
harsher punishment" (Opinion, Wednesday).

First of all, it is completely incorrect to say all crimes are hate crimes the majority of conservatives
believe that all crimes are worthy of punishment, not that all crimes are hate crimes.

The current hate crime legislation is redundant and offensive to Republicans (and should be to anyone who
values human life) because it assumes that killing a homosexual is somehow worse than, for instance, killing a
police officer. Is a drive-by shooting resulting in murder somehow better than beating and killing a homosexual?

Hate crime legislation punishes people for intolerance towards minorities and gives them a harsher sentence
than for a "regular" crime. People who kill homosexuals should get the exact same sentence as those who
murder any other human being, a minority or not.

I am not in any way saying that the people who killed James Byrd Jr. and Matthew Shepherd were right in what
they did. They should be punished for the rest of their lives or put to death since they so horribly took a
precious life themselves. The majority of conservatives believe in the sanctity of life, whether it be that of an
unborn child, a homosexual, a black person or otherwise.

Second, what Carradine calls "passive prejudice" is also ridiculous. It is not that we don't want to hear about it,
it is that homosexuality is sinful: 

"Do you not know that the wicked will not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived: Neither the sexually
immoral nor idolaters nor adulterers nor male prostitutes nor homosexual offenders will inherit the kingdom of
God" (1 Corinthians 6:9).

How absurd is it that when we call somebody on being immoral, suddenly we are prejudiced? If that is what
prejudice is (being completely against homosexuality), then call me prejudiced. I am prejudiced against sin.

This is not to say that I do not sin, for I do, as everyone does. But continually living in sin is not something
most conservatives want to compromise with. It is as simple as that.

I have homosexual friends, and I completely disagree with their lifestyle. However, I am taught as a Christian to
love everyone, including those who do what is deemed as sinful.

Continuing on, Carradine's term "blind acceptance" is used simply to allow people to continue doing whatever
they please despite any consequences. Meanwhile, those who call people to live their lives in a moral manner
are attacked because we do not accept it. Murder is a sin as well; should everyone blindly accept it when people
murder others?

Instead of saying that hate crimes need harsher punishment, why not pursue a useful cause in proclaiming that
all crime should be punished equally regardless of why it was committed. Next time you coin a conservative
phrase, please try to be more accurate in telling us what we believe.

Christi Darden
senior, music education
 
 


Letters Policy

Letters to the editor are welcome from all members of the UH community and should focus on issues, not personalities. Letters must be typed and must include the author's name, telephone number and affiliation with the University. Anonymous letters will not be published. Letters are subject to editing for clarity, language and space. Letters may be delivered in person to Room 151, Communication; e-mailed to dclettrs@mail.uh.edu; or faxed to (713) 743-5384.

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