Wednesday, September 12, 2001 Volume 67, Issue 595


 
 









 

Staff Editorial



EDITORIAL BOARD

Tom Carpenter        Ken Fountain 
Nikie Johnson          Keenan Singleton       Audrey Warren


Tuesday Editorial

American Airlines Flight 587 bound for the Dominican Republic crashed four minutes after taking off from John F. Kennedy Airport on Monday.
Two hundred and fifty-four passengers and crewmembers, and an unknown number of persons on the ground, were killed in the crash.

Eyewitnesses said the plane was on fire and began to fall apart in the air before it nose-dived into a residential area of Queens, N.Y.

A nervous nation awaits word from the federal government to learn if another battle was lost in the war on terrorism or if a mechanical malfunction
caused the plane to crash.

Either way, the American Airlines crash hammered another savage blow against America's fragile psyche, already staggering from the heinous
terrorist attacks of Sept. 11.

The crash of the Airbus A300 could send a number of U.S. airlines already tottering on the brink of disaster into bankruptcy, as well as many of the
satellite businesses serving the airline industry.

Federal Aviation Authority spokesman Paul Takemoto said there was no initial indication of what caused the twin-engine plane to fall from the sky.

This incident, in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks, caused Wall Street to react by sending the Dow Jones industrial average down more than
100 points.

Although early reports indicate the crash was an accident, the immediate plunge in the stock market demonstrated the nation's fragile mood and
skepticism.

"Today's incident comes at a difficult time for the nation, the airline industry and American Airlines," American Airlines Chairman Donald Carty said.

FBI officials said they couldn't rule out terrorism, but the crash was being investigated as an accident.

No matter what caused Flight 587 to crash, aviation officials predict travelers will become more wary about flying as the holiday season
approaches.

Since Sept. 11, the airline industry has cut about 100,000 jobs, about 10 percent of its workforce.

Americans must persevere and endure the nervous uncertainty until the cause of the crash is determined. As terrible as a crash caused by
mechanical failure is for everyone, it pales beside the portent of another successful terrorist attack.

We are a sadder, wiser nation since Sept. 11, and now we must be a more patient nation, too.
 
 

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