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Volume 68, Issue 4, Thursday, August 29, 2002

Arts & Entertainment
 
 

SNL comedian adds to comedic repertoire with album

By Geronimo Rodriguez
The Daily Cougar

Jimmy Fallon is the latest comedian from Saturday Night Live's endless ensemble to branch into other forms of entertainment, with hopes of
cashing in on one of television's more appealing mainstays.


Photo courtesy of Dreamworks Records


Saturday Night Live's Jimmy Fallon's first album, The Bathroom Wall, combines funny lyrics with an array of sounds.

But whether it's playing host to one of MTV's award shows or plugging in the electric guitar, Fallon is one of the funnier comedians in today's
spotlight.

Already into his fourth season as the sometimes bumbling, always funny, player, Fallon entertains with talents ranging from mimicry to wry
sarcasm while anchoring the programs renowned "Weekend Update." Fallon has yet to venture onto the big screen, where many of his
predecessors have found success.

Instead, he's poked his head into the limelight for a few appearances; check out the hilarious American Idol pseudo-commercial or tonight's
MTV's Video Music Awards.

But, as is proven on his album debut, The Bathroom Wall, the messy-haired, slightly built entertainer takes chances by penning a few lines of
nonsense, only to do his best to hold a note and strum a guitar all this for a laugh.

Following in Adam Sandler's footsteps, Fallon relies on childish quips to add laughs to the background vocals, a number of instruments and
mixes.

From the disco feel of the opening track, "Idiot Boyfriend," to the twangy harmonica in "Drinking in the Woods," Fallon shows he can at least try to
be musically versatile. But the effort just adds to the album's humor.

After five tracks of giddy humor, Fallon walks away from the recording studio and onto a place more comfortable for a comedian: the stage.

In front of a young crowd, Fallon goes into his stand-up mode and flaunts just about everything in his comedic repertoire.

He begins with an impersonation of John Travolta selling a Troll doll, going off on a tangent about the Troll's hair, with a few of Travolta's "I
mean, like" trademark blurbs thrown in the mix. This is followed by dead-on impersonations of Robin Williams, Jerry Seinfeld and even Adam
Sandler, to name a few.

The track goes stale for a while as Fallon rambles on about college life (bad roommates, sharing showers, finding the perfect fake ID, etc.). It
picks up, however, when Fallon delves into yet another impersonation, this one of Chris Rock.

After more moments of drivel, listeners find laughs when the comedian starts again with the guitar and mimics artists like R.E.M., Counting
Crows, Coldplay and Dave Matthews Band, replacing their more recognized songs with gibberish about, guess who, the Troll.

These are, by far, some of the more entertaining moments in the album. It makes one wonder why Fallon stopped with the music only five tracks
into the album.

In "Idiot Boyfriend," for instance, Fallon jabs about a boyfriend who screws everything up, going on with the lines, "Hey baby, you like fine
cooking?/ Cause I got a Swanson dinner in the freezer/ With your name on it."

This is followed by a fast-paced romp about how bad he is in basketball by belting, "Wear my socks high/ Cause it makes me feel cool/ Don't
know how to dribble/ But I know how to drool."

Rounding out the music-filled tracks are "Road Rage," "Snowball" and "Drinking in the Woods," where he warbles reasons why he doesn't want
to carry his Gatorade bottle filled with Smirnoff into the woods anymore, but he still does it.

As mentioned before, the lyrics are good enough for a giggle here and there, but only when coupled with mixes and earnest attempts at singing
does Fallon's debut have some comedic moments truly worth the time.

Next time, if there is one, Fallon should stick to the musical mimicry and save the stand-up for some teen-targeted awards show.

 Send comments to dcshobiz@mail.uh.edu

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