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Volume 71, Issue 136, Thursday, April 27, 2006

Life & Arts

Bridges addicted to some bad junk

Film Scamp

Geronimo Rodriguez 

What was Jeff Bridges thinking when he agreed to star in the new Walt Disney film Stick It (what an appropriate name for a film geared toward teens)? We're talking about a four-time Academy Award nominee who can be seen this weekend opposite a handful of teenage girls running around in leotards. We're talking about the guy who dominated the screen with Starman, The Big Lebowski and The Door in the Floor. We're talking about a complete waste of time and talent.

Yes, this product of nepotism -- his father is Lloyd Bridges -- has decided to take a turn for the worst and lend his name to Stick It, which doesn't seem to have much of a plot and is from the makers of Bring It On. Bridges can try and steal the show all he wants here because there isn't much to steal. Even if he did base his character on legendary gymnastics coach Bela Karolyi, it wouldn't make much of a difference because this is a Walt Disney film at its worst and it makes me nauseous to think Bridges would have any part in it.


There's no telling what was on Jeff Bridges' mind when he signed on to play a role in the Walt Disney film Stick It.

Photo courtesy of Walt Disney Pictures

Granted, there's no reason why I should care about what Bridges does with his life, but I think it's time for some kind of intervention. I think those closest to Bridges should sit him down and talk to him about how much this move is not only hurting him, but those around him as well. The Bridges family has already seen Beau Bridges, Jeff's older brother, all strung out on making B-movies, and I just don't think the clan can handle watching Jeff go down those same lonely, dusty roads. Next thing you know, they'll find old Jeff locked up in some dank hotel room, just waiting for some shady agent to show up with some bunk script. Whether it's some whacky TV stuff or just more Mickey Mouse junk that gets in his veins, it'll hook Jeff once again and we'll never see the return of one of today's greatest character actors.

It's OK, though. I'm sure Houstonians, the gymnastics fans they are, will just love watching all these kids mount some junk, jump off and stick their landing or some junk like that. I wonder if they'll show how all those gymnasts get their feet to be so tiny. Perhaps we'll get a behind-the-scenes account of what really happens behind the stalls after these girls eat a full-course meal. I'm not judging anyone, but there are many hungry kids in Manchester who would die for a nice steak and mashed potatoes.

Speaking of mashed potatoes, United 93 hits theaters this weekend. The film is about one of the four planes that were hijacked by terrorists on September 11, 2001. I don't have a problem with a film depicting what happened on that tragic day; I just wonder what took filmmakers so long to actually do it.

I don't even care that the film is carried by a bunch of no-name actors. The filmmakers probably did this on purpose to add realism to the plot. I mean, the trailers play out like a dry docudrama, but that may have been the only way to bring to life such touchy subject matter.

It's a daring attempt by the filmmakers despite it taking about five years for this movie to hit the screen. Perhaps we'll learn exactly what the terrorists were thinking when they thought to crash into the White House.
 

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