The Daily Cougar Online
Today's Weather

Sunny weather

Hi 94 / Lo 70


University of Houston HomepageUniversity of Houston Department of Student PublicationsUH Houstonian YearbookWestern Association of University Publications ManagersThe Daily Cougar Online StaffThe Daily Cougar Copyright & Web Use NoticeThe Daily Cougar AwardsAbout The Daily Cougar OnlineThe Daily Cougar Campus Spotlight Online FormThe Daily Cougar Online ArchivesThe Daily Cougar Ad Rates & InformationWelcome to The Daily Cougar OnlineThe Daily Cougar Online Campus SpotlightThe Daily Cougar Online ComicsThe Daily Cougar Online Life & ArtsThe Daily Cougar Online SportsThe Daily Cougar Online OpinionThe Dailly Cougar Online News

Student Publications
University of Houston
151C Communications Bldg
Houston, TX 77204-4015
713.743.5350

©1991-2007
Student Publications,
All rights reserved.

Last modified:

Contact:
ktruitt@uh.edu

Volume 72, Issue 9, Thursday, August 31, 2006

Opinion

Education not just about money

Santiago Lopez
Opinion Columnist 

Here we all are, toiling away to complete our degree requirements as fast as humanly possible. After all, a prosperous future is ahead of any college graduate, since having more education is equated with higher pay. 

With a better salary, one can drive a nicer car, which is often the first item a recent college graduate purchases after securing that all-important job after graduation. Finance companies offer college grad financing since they too know about the increased salary afforded to those with a higher education.

If the only reason you are in school is to get the highest paying job possible, then do yourself a favor: Drop out and find a job now. 

There's no sense in suffering through another semester of classes with zero monetary payout when you could be working and earning a paycheck. Sure, you won't be making as much money without a degree as you would with one, but that should not matter if all you are after is the almighty dollar. If money is the only goal in your pursuit of a college degree, then you are in school for the wrong reason.

College years are a stepping stone to the future; students are bound by their minds and what we feel we can achieve in the four (or seven) years we are in school. 

It's nice to think students will be model employees once they enter the workforce, but if they are mediocre students, they will likely be less than stellar members of the business world.

Money is nice; people who have it have a lot of nice things and drive nice cars. Those without money usually want what affluent people have. But material possessions are nothing compared to earning a college degree. A student's pursuit of a degree speaks volumes about the type of employee he will be in the future.

Some students might copy and paste large sections of papers for classes in order to do the least amount of work possible; they view passing a class as just being one step closer to receiving that coveted degree. Surely a future boss will appreciate plagiarism.

If those students who are habitually late for class continue their behavior, they may upset co-workers who struggle to complete work in order to compensate for an employee's absence. 

How seriously one takes his or her classes relates to future job performance. After all, students who scrape their way through college courses have no reason to perform differently at work. The manner in which someone earns that precious degree speaks volumes about their character. 

If you are content in doing the least amount possible to get a passing grade in a course, then your future company will appreciate the less-than-hard work you put forth in completing a certain aspect of your job's duties. 

If you don't expend any effort in obtaining your degree, there's nothing to keep you from not trying hard when it comes to earning your paycheck in the high-paying vocation that your second-rate college performance secured. 

Lopez, a creative writing senior, 
can be reached via dccampus@mail.uh.edu

The Daily Cougar Online
 
 



Tell us how we're doing.

To contact the 
OpinionSection Editor, click the e-mail link at the end of this article.

To contact other members of 
The Daily Cougar Online staff,
click here .



House Ad

Visit The Daily Cougar